Michael Scotto: Suns and Nuggets have discussed a trade…

More on Emmanuel Mudiay Trade

Marc Berman: According to source, Denver had called teams about PG Mudiay, including Knicks. They passed him over once before.
The Denver Nuggets and Phoenix Suns have held discussions on a trade that would send point guard Emmanuel Mudiay and the No. 13 pick in Thursday's NBA draft for point guard Eric Bledsoe, league sources told ESPN. However, sources described the dialogue as "fluid."
That leaves only a few plausible alternatives. The Pistons could target a distressed young point guard like Elfrid Payton or Emmanuel Mudiay, and snag a rental wing to make up the salary gap. Mudiay is available, per several league sources, though it appears Denver has no interest in Jackson. Orlando remains an intriguing fit; Rob Hennigan, the Magic GM, was part of the Thunder front office that drafted Jackson, and the team is starting freaking C.J. Watson over Payton.
Mudiay is available, per several league sources, though it appears Denver has no interest in Jackson.
Denver Nuggets coach Michael Malone dismissed trade rumors involving Wilson Chandler and Emmanuel Mudiay, saying that recent reports about the players are "a lot of noise."
Malone said Nuggets general manager Tim Connelly reached out to Mudiay and told the young point guard not to "believe any of this stuff." "Emmanuel's a big part of our future," Malone said. "Tim Connelly's not actively shopping Emmanuel Mudiay. That's just not accurate, it's not fair, and Emmanuel knows that."
The Nuggets are quietly exploring what they might get for Emmanuel Mudiay and multiple picks, sources say, but they're in no rush to move Mudiay, and the Suns may not want him when they could simply draft a point guard. There aren't that many teams with a need at the position, and not much reason to exchange Bledsoe for another established guy -- say, Reggie Jackson or Ricky Rubio -- unless the other team includes a pretty damned good pick to sweeten the pot.
Storyline: Emmanuel Mudiay Trade
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August 11, 2022 | 1:42 pm EDT Update

Jeremy Lin: I didn't like a lot of the side effects of Linsanity

Jeremy Lin wasn’t the first Asian-American to play in the NBA but he was by far the most prominent and noteworthy and the sociological impact of his NBA career has been hugely significant. It’s worth pausing for a second, though, to imaging being the human being at the centre of all that. It wasn’t easy at the time and it’s been something that Lin has had to learn to live with since. “I think for me as a person, it’s been an evolution from trying to run away from it because I felt like I didn’t like a lot of the side effects of Linsanity,” he explained. “Some family issues that it caused, all the privacy that was taken away from me overnight, and the paparazzi chasing down me and my family and my friends… just a lot of scary things that had happened.”
Jeremy Lin: “There were also just the expectations of the world, almost turning me into some type of superhero. I became this phenomenon and I felt like I lost my humanity in the middle of it. Then eventually, I started to understand racism at a better level, at a deeper level. For so long, I tried to run from being ‘the Asian basketball player’, I just wanted to be a great basketball player – because my whole life, everyone was just talking about [my ethnicity]. I just wanted people to talk about my basketball skills for once, so as I started to run from that, I started to really open my perspective, seeing what racism really does and how embedded it is and how deep it is.”
Jeremy Lin: “Culturally, I realised, this moment is much more than basketball, it’s much more than that season, it is much more than just the New York Knicks and Jeremy Lin – this is a story that will be told for years and years and years and that has shattered so many stereotypes, and so many boxes that society has tried to put on minorities. That’s where I’m at with it now and I’m very grateful. So now, I try to tell the story in meaningful ways, beyond just trying to glorify myself for what I did on the court. But to really talk about what that moment meant to a lot of people and why it meant so much.”
Jalen Green looks to build a winning mentality and be the best version of himself as he gears up for his sophomore season, where opposing teams are now more focused on stopping him. “My mindset is to go in and be the best version of myself on and off the court. Like I said, I’d try to build a winning mentality,” said Green in the JG4 press conference at the Adidas Brand Center at Glorietta 3 in Makati on Thursday. “We (the Rockets) are very young. We’re rebuilding right now. We try to go in the right direction and try to keep the same (winning) mindset and try to win.”
August 11, 2022 | 1:32 pm EDT Update

Chris Paul on being named to the NBA 75th Anniversary Team: I'll never forget it

Chris Paul: For all these years I have just kept my head down and done the work, and I can honestly say that being named to the NBA 75 team, the day we did that huge photoshoot, I’ll never forget it. I met a number of players that I had never met for the first time. Being in the same setting, all of us, at the same time, was the craziest feeling. Standing there and taking a picture with John Stockton and Isiah Thomas and Magic Johnson, all of these guys that I have watched since I was a kid. It’s something that will live forever, I’m grateful.