Why did a team that overachieved in Fizdale's first sea…

Why did a team that overachieved in Fizdale’s first season suddenly pull the plug just 19 games into his second? The short answer is that he and Marc Gasol didn’t get along. The complex reason, as league sources laid out, is that the partnership was doomed from the start. Carrying a mantra Fizdale liked to repeat — “the Miami Heat way” – he tried to completely overhaul a system and core that’d been successful for seven seasons and peaked with an appearance in the Western Conference finals.
Storyline: Knicks Coaching Job
More HoopsHype Rumors
January 19, 2019 | 12:25 pm EST Update
A young​ Elie Okobo​ did​ not​ watch​ Saturday-morning cartoons before heading to his​ basketball games.​ He​ watched replays​ of​ San​​ Antonio Spurs games broadcast from thousands of miles away, dazzled by fellow Frenchman and point guard Tony Parker. Less than two weeks ago, Okobo sat down at swanky Scottsdale seafood restaurant Ocean 44 to share a postgame dinner with Parker. The two had just guarded each other in Charlotte’s win at Phoenix. Parker’s teammate, Nic Batum, and former Suns and Spurs player Boris Diaw joined them. The meal epitomized the bond NBA players from France share, even when they are opponents on the floor or their playing careers have concluded. Okobo, aka “Young Frenchie,” is the latest to join that club, already contributing to the Suns as a rookie and occasionally matching up against his childhood idol. “I want to be this guy one day, the guy that the (French) kids look up to,” Okobo said. “I think I’m on my way. I gotta keep working.”
Diaw understands Okobo’s first-year learning curve in both the NBA and the U.S. Through frequent text exchanges, Diaw preaches patience, strong work ethic and reacting positively to adversity such as sporadic playing time and mounting losses for this young Suns team. “Little by little, I think (Okobo) can be somebody that they can count on for on-ball defense, as well as being able to spark some offense,” Diaw said. “He’s somebody that’s pretty versatile and can do different things on the court. … What he can control is how he’s practicing every day (and) how he wants to learn.”
Okobo was most impressed with how Parker calmly used ball screens and surveyed the defense for large chunks of the shot clock. Parker, meanwhile, praised Okobo’s potential — and that his lefty handle and shot makes him “a pain in the butt to guard.” “He’s got all the tools to be a good point guard in this league …” Parker said. “Then, it’s all about getting opportunities and making sure he gets a coach who can trust him.”
January 19, 2019 | 11:21 am EST Update
Home