The Clippers wanted to use 22 acres of vacant, city-own…

The Clippers wanted to use 22 acres of vacant, city-owned land across West Century Boulevard from the NFL stadium development — parcels that had been leased to the Madison Square Garden Co., the New York-based sports and entertainment giant that owns the nearby Forum, for overflow parking. A year and a half later, the land is the subject of a bitter legal fight pitting Inglewood and Ballmer, the former Microsoft chief executive estimated by Forbes to be worth more than $42 billion, against MSG, whose holdings include the NBA’s New York Knicks, the NHL’s New York Rangers, esports teams and entertainment venues across the country, along with a stake in the Tribeca Film Festival. At the center of the case — and the negotiations that could further Inglewood’s metamorphosis into a sports mecca — is Butts.

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Clippers management, which is eager to build a new arena for its team and move from its current hub at Staples Center, hailed the Legislative approvals even though it remains unclear whether the governor will sign the bill into law. "We are now one step closer to bringing the world's best basketball arena to a community that deserves the best," Clippers owner Steve Ballmer said in a statement late Friday. "... with the passage of this bill, we are proudly setting a new standard for environmental responsibility. AB 987 puts into writing the promise we've made to Inglewood from the start: to be exceptional neighbors who care passionately about the Inglewood community and its citizens."

http://twitter.com/Steven_Ballmer/status/1035762582773219328
The project proposal calls for a privately funded complex that would include an 18,000-seat arena, practice facilities, a sports medicine clinic, team offices and retail space under the title Inglewood Basketball and Entertainment Center. Plans for the complex are continuing under a 36-month exclusive negotiating agreement the team's owners paid for with a $1.5 million nonrefundable deposit. The team's lease at Staples Center expires in 2024.
Arash Markazi: The new @ClippersArena would be located across the street from the new football stadium and Hollywood Park Casino. It would seat about 18,000 fans and cost about $1.2 billion. The arena, which would open in 2024, would also house the team’s practice facility and team offices. pic.twitter.com/AHBgPJpxjK
The latest lawsuit argues that that land should have been made available for affordable housing development before it was offered to the Clippers, as over 80 percent of Inglewood's population qualifies for some form of subsidized housing. "We don't know why they continue to push in the face of such strong residential opposition," said Dr. D'Artagnan Scorza, a local resident, school board member and member of Uplift Inglewood. "It doesn't make any sense to us except that they're facing a $17 million budget deficit as a result of financial mismanagement and they're probably trying to figure out a way to shore up the city's finances utilizing these projects."
An attorney representing Inglewood officials, including the city's mayor, called a lawsuit filed by Madison Square Garden a "sham" in court documents filed Monday. Madison Square Garden Co., owners of The Forum, sued Inglewood and Murphy's Bowl LLC — a Clippers-controlled company — over plans to explore a new arena in the city for the team. The lawsuit alleges fraud and breach of contract, claims attorney Skip Miller vigorously denied in the filing. "By its lawsuit, Madison Square Garden is trying to block the Clippers' move and construction of the arena, to impede competition and stifle the economic growth of Inglewood," the filing says.
Steve Ballmer: Today, we are expanding that investment by entering into an agreement to explore an opportunity to build a new arena for the Clippers in the City of Inglewood. I have said from day one that we need to plan for the future. This agreement helps us do that by expanding our options. The prospect of a new state-of-the-art NBA arena would allow us greater latitude to influence our game schedule, particularly as it relates to weekend games that are so important to our fans. We also want to offer our fans premium experiences in terms of technology, club spaces and other amenities; that’s easier to realize in a new arena.
Steve Ballmer: During the upcoming planning process, the Clippers and the City of Inglewood will work diligently together to evaluate this project in great detail. Regardless of where the Clippers take the court after 2024, I remain committed to helping the great city of Los Angeles and its citizens thrive. We look forward to sharing our progress as we continue along our journey to deliver championship results for our fans and the entire Los Angeles region.
The Inglewood City Council unanimously approved an exclusive negotiating agreement with the LA Clippers on Thursday that could lead to the construction of an arena for the NBA team across the street from the future home of the NFL's Chargers and Rams.
The agreement calls for a three-year negotiating period, including a six-month extension, with a developer to build a state-of-the-art basketball arena with 18,000 to 20,000 seats. It requires the Clippers to pay a nonrefundable $1.5 million deposit to cover costs associated with the planning. The proposed arena would be on a 20-acre parcel of land located across the street from the under-construction, $2.6 billion NFL stadium that is set to open in 2020. The Clippers' complex would include team offices, parking and a practice facility.
The Clippers could be on the move. And in the process, supplementing the newest Los Angeles entertainment and sports hub and the future home of the Rams and Chargers. According to multiple sources, the Clippers and the city of Inglewood are closing in on entering an Exclusive Negotiating Agreement (ENA) on 22 acres of land between Prairie and Yukon Avenue south of Century Boulevard.
You don’t have to confirm or deny any of this, but I’ve heard rumors about you looking on the West Side for an arena, [or] you’re maybe gonna be involved with the [Stan] Kroenke thing in Inglewood. What is the ideal size of an NBA arena for you if you were building one from scratch? Did you study the Sacramento one? Have you looked at that? Because I think that’s the best one anyone’s built so far. Ballmer: There’s multiple ways to think about an arena.
Representatives of Steve Ballmer and Stan Kroenke, two of the richest owners in professional sports, have had multiple discussions about the Clippers joining the Rams and Chargers in the sports and entertainment district Kroenke is building in Inglewood.
Five people with knowledge of the conversations told The Times the arena could either be on the 298-acre site or an adjacent parcel. Either way, an arena would drive traffic to the planned mixed-use development and share parking with the $2.6-billion football stadium scheduled to open in 2019. The exploratory talks link two titans of sports and business with a sprawling project the NFL already considers transformational.
Inglewood is one of multiple sites the Clippers are exploring in a process that started more than a year ago. The Clippers aren’t settled on a course of action — staying at Staples Center or building a new arena — but the Inglewood discussions are part of their ongoing evaluation of potential options, according to the five people. “It’s too soon to say it would be L.A. Live lite, but if an arena were to bring 200 nights a year, that’s a tremendous amount of foot traffic that would benefit all the ancillary properties,” said a person familiar with the discussions who asked not to be identified in order to speak frankly about the situation.
Storyline: New Clippers Arena
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Optimism among Bucks that Brook Lopez could return this season

There is optimism within the organization, though, that Lopez could return this season, per a team source. And while this is the 14th NBA season for the 33-year-old Lopez, Budenholzer told reporters the team does not believe this surgery has a chance to be career-threatening.
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“Hey, listen – you know what surprised me the most is how many fans are reaching out on e-mail, DM, everything, comments, talking about coming to the game,” he said in an interview with the Journal Sentinel. “It’s really … that part was the part that made me think back and really think about it even before I talked to you. Because you can’t, like, you can’t make that up. Guys go play for teams and win and people don’t care. People could care less. And I know that for a fact. “For the love I still get, even though I’m on an opposite team who their guys will battle this year and to still get that love, that’s what I’m saying about my experience in Milwaukee that nobody will ever understand: As short as it was, it couldn’t have been any bigger.”
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And Wall’s remaining money is significantly more than Walker’s was. For a Wall buyout to make any sense for the Rockets, Wall would likely have to give up even more than Walker did to the Thunder — and there’s next to no chance Wall could make that up in his next deal. At any rate, that hasn’t been seriously discussed by either side as a possibility. “It’s hard for him at this point in time, when your salary doesn’t equal what your production is,” a sympathetic front office person from another team said Wednesday. “That’s hard for him. It’s hard for a lot of guys.”
Storyline: John Wall Buyout?