Brett Dawson: Paul George will go through a warmup and …

More on Paul George Injury

Malika Andrews: Billy Donovan said a decision on whether or not Paul George (shoulder) will play tonight against the Bucks will be made after warm ups. He said there is no expectation this injury would keep George out in the playoffs.
Royce Young: Paul George is a game-time decision still, Billy Donovan says (sore left shoulder). George will go through a pregame workout and make a decision from there.
Brett Dawson: Paul George took a hit to his shoulder getting over a screen in the Indiana game. Billy Donovan didn’t know the specific play and isn’t sure if it was the hard hit PG took on a Domantas Sabonis screen.
Brett Dawson: No Paul George update from Thunder shootaround. Billy Donovan will give an update pregame.
Erik Horne: Billy Donovan said he’s known about Paul George’s nerve issue in his foot for a while. “I think there’s times where he wishes he could push off a little better, move a little better.”
Erik Horne: I’ve been told by the Thunder the nerve issue is not connected to any previous issue PG has had. George has played through it since preseason, which indicates it’s not serious enough to where he/OKC feels he needs to sit.
He had it drained this offseason and found the source of his discomfort.  “I had a huge sac, 18 to 20 ounces of blood just sitting in the sac of my elbow, so I had that aspirated,” George said. “I was dealing with that for pretty much the whole season. That was causing a lot of frustration with shooting, and playing. To be able to shoot again, to be able to feel confident in my shot, to not have that on my mind, playing on the court … I’m great going forward.”
On May 9 he had arthroscopic surgery on his left knee.  “The knee is doing good,” he said in the Post story. “It still has a long way to go. … It looks like I’m doing well, but I’m still working through some stuff, and still working on trusting and putting full confidence in my leg. I’m a little ways away, but there’s no pain, there’s no swelling, there’s nothing I’m concerned about. I’m just not at the level I need to be. There’s no limitations. All it is is taking steps, all it is is progression. I’m just trying to get ready and prepare for training camp down the line.”

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Fred Katz: Paul George (right hip contusion) did not go through contact parts of Thunder practice today, per Billy Donovan. Corey Brewer (right knee sprain) went through some contact drills. Donovan said they’ll know more tomorrow.
Fred Katz: Steven Adams (left hip contusion) is available to play. Paul George (pelvic strain) a game-time decision.
Brett Dawson: Paul George will play tonight. Andre Roberson is out.
Nike designer Tony Hardman said there was a point where nobody at the brand knew if they’d be moving forward with a Paul George signature shoe or not. “You don't know if a guy is gonna come back from an injury like that,” Hardman told Sole Collector. “That's a crazy injury to try and come back from. So, even for me as a designer, it was almost like the resource was kinda put on hold for a little bit. We don't know what's gonna happen with Paul.”
“It wasn’t really on my mind whether I lost the shoe or if that dream was out the window or not,” George told Sole Collector. “During that time period I was more concerned that my job was at stake.” In retrospect, Hardman calls the injury a blessing in disguise in that it gave the design team more time to get to know George. It also pushed back the debut date of the Nike PG1 shoe, which was originally scheduled to release in 2016.
Nate Taylor: The Pacers have announced that Paul George (left ankle) & Kevin Seraphin (left knee) are out the next 3 games. Paul George & Kevin Seraphin will miss tonight's game, Sunday’s game against the Clippers & Wednesday’s game against the Trail Blazers.
McMillan gave no indication Saturday that George’s injuries would force him to miss a significant amount of time. George is hopeful he will be in uniform Monday when the Pacers face the Orlando Magic. “It’s a day-to-day thing,” George said. “It’s just a little soreness. I hoping tomorrow that it feels a lot better.”
George, who leads the Pacers with 21.9 points per game, watched Saturday’s game from the bench in a dark gray suit jacket. “I really couldn’t move off of (my left ankle), I couldn’t turn my ankle, I couldn’t cut if I wanted to,” George said. “I had a hard time walking this morning. I knew I probably wasn’t going to be able to go tonight, but I gave it a shot.”
Paul George was ruled out for Saturday’s game against the Boston Celtics at Bankers Life Fieldhouse due to a sore left ankle. The decision was announced about 70 minutes before tip-off. The injury occurred during Friday’s overtime loss at Philadelphia. “The ankle (swelled) up today,” Pacers head coach Nate McMillan said an hour and 45 minutes before the game, and before it was announced that George would not play.
Kyrie Irving, however, had the most unrestrained, emotional reaction to George’s leg snapping, an incident that no one in the arena could fully comprehend. Unable to watch, Irving buried his head in the chest of his father, Drederick, and began to cry uncontrollably. “I don’t think I really understood the magnitude of it, what transpired. I’m thinking, like, when is he going to be back?” Irving recalled this week as the U.S. men’s Olympic basketball team held training camp for the Rio Games. “In that moment, I don’t know the injury. I don’t know what happened. I knew it was pretty gruesome.”
“It feels like, what can you do?” Krzyzewski said of that moment, but the words eventually came. ” ‘We want you in 2016.’ Jerry and I both said that, ‘We know you’re going to recover.’ We didn’t know if he would.”
Colangelo said the incentivized gesture USA Basketball extended in the aftermath of George’s injury was the “right thing to do,” but George also rewarded that blind faith, making easy the decision to add him to the 12-man roster. “I’m here for a reason,” George told The Vertical. “I’m not just a guy that Coach K brought along.”
No such store existed. If George were going to return, he would have to work his way back. Which he has, after two years, a season-and-a-sliver with the Pacers and a whole lot of changes for him and his team. And this week, a media gauntlet reminding him constantly, in their grasp for perspective and an angle, of the shock, fear, pain, uncertainty and work it took to finally get back. "I'm telling reporters I'm done answering that one," George said.
"We're not forced to play for our country. We do it because we want to," George said, "I think that's the story that's not being told. We want to represent our country, same way guys in the military, in the Navy, in the Army. They're not forced to be in it. They do it because they want to defend their country. So it's hard to say -- injuries, death for what they do -- it's part of it, unfortunately."
Storyline: Paul George Injury
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July 27, 2021 | 2:34 pm EDT Update
So while Cunningham may share traits with Magic and Bird, the view of him as a can’t-miss prospect is much easier to process because of current-day players like Jokic—and, in particular, Luka Doncic. In broad strokes, Cunningham and Doncic may well be geminis of a very specific playmaking archetype. It’s rare to see perimeter players leverage their size, strength, and stride to create space in the way that both players seem innately aware and capable of. “As prospects, I do think Cade has a pretty similar baseline in terms of the vision and the way he sees the court, the way he processes how everyone is moving,” Zaucha said.
One watches Cunningham expecting a beeline to the right decision; one watches Doncic expecting the seas to magically part, showing another way. But the stylistic difference may not have much effect on substance. “I wonder if there really is a gap in their creativity—the way they manipulate defenders, especially—or if it’s some sort of aesthetic bias at play,” Zaucha said. “Because Luka loves to make those creative decisions, and then sell it with a behind-the-back pass or some wild delivery that the defense doesn’t expect. Whereas I think Cade—from a decision-making perspective, I think Cade solves problems in creative ways, he just doesn’t always make them look creative.”
Who are some of the NBA guys that you like to watch to help improve your game? Jeremiah Robinson-Earl: Two players I really like to watch are Draymond Green and Bam Adebayo. Draymond is a two-way player but defensive-minded and gets everything going for the team. He is very much a facilitator and he is able to find guys but still be aggressive to get his shot or to attack the goal. He is the glue to the team that is really important. I enjoy watching Draymond a lot because he’s just elite at facilitating, defense and being able to guard one through five. Bam, offensively, he is able to score at all three levels. He is able to have mismatches in the post and he is quick on his feet. He is able to hit tough turnaround shots. I like how he gets a lot of play out of the mid-post. I got a lot of that at Villanova this past season. I’m able to watch him get a lot of plays out of the midrange area with jab jumpers and rips to the goal for a dunk. He’s a playmaker, too, and he’s able to stretch to the three.
What about your game do you think will translate best to the next level in the pros? Jeremiah Robinson-Earl: I take a lot of pride in defensive and rebounding. I feel like, at every level, those are two things that can get you on the court. Coach Wright had a triangle for success and at the bottom of the triangle was defense and the next one was rebounding. If you can’t defend or rebound for Coach Wright, you’re not going to be in a position to be on the court. I know that’s gotten me to where I am today. I take a lot of pride in it and I want to keep doing what got me to this position today and keep being myself. I’m in a position to be drafted. Now is not the time to start doing things that I don’t normally do. I just need to keep focusing on doing what I do really well and knowing that what’s gotten me here has gotten me here. I’m going to keep excelling at that to the fullest. My weaknesses, I’ll get better at those on a year-to-year basis. I want to just keep gradually getting better and better.
Junior Robinson might be the only player in the history of college basketball to actively reduce his height in college, only to get taller as a pro. But the notion of players and coaches fudging their proportions is nothing new. Indeed, the basic assumption is that everyone is lying. This is college basketball, after all. Everyone’s looking for any tiny edge. Why would this be any different? So when I explain this idea to some coaches — that I researched the last 11 seasons of NBA Draft Combine height measurements, compared that to the prospects’ college figures and put it all in one big spreadsheet to see where the data would take us — they chuckled knowingly. “This is a great idea,” one coach said, “if you want to see how full of shit coaches really are.”
Storyline: Draft Combine
“It’s not always the kid,” Xavier coach Travis Steele said. “You’ll get a mentor or a parent in there saying, ‘Our Jimmy Joe is 6-foot-5!’ And you’re like, no, he’s 6-foot-3.’ We’ll get hit by parents who are sure their kid is taller than that. And it’s like, no, he’s really not.” There are other gambits, too. “You get kids who are 17 and they’re 6-foot-3, and they say, ‘Oh, (the doctor says) I’m going to be 6-foot-6,’” Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said. “You know, ‘My growth plates are wide open.’ When I first got into coaching 30 years ago, I believed those kids. None of them — OK, very rarely — do you get a David Robinson. It just doesn’t happen.”