“I talk to Bradley all the time. I’ve previewed eve…

“I talk to Bradley all the time. I’ve previewed everything that we’re doing all along the way. But I don’t expect Bradley — just like you shouldn’t expect me to do an interview with someone in two hours and say, ‘Okay!’ I’m not going to be waiting there, Tommy’s not going to be waiting there for a signature,” Leonsis said. “He’ll want to meet all these people. He’ll want to see what our plans are. But Brad knows he’s respected, he’s loved and we’re committed. And I’m hoping that he believes in this new NBA where it’s two players and a great rotation that ‘Why not us?’

More on Bradley Beal Extension?

Washington Wizards general manager Tommy Sheppard will offer guard Bradley Beal a three-year, $111 million maximum contract extension upon the All-Star becoming eligible to sign on Friday, Sheppard told ESPN. "At the very first moment allowed, we are going to offer Brad the full max extension," Sheppard told ESPN.
Beal, 26, has until Oct. 21 to sign the extension, which would start with the 2021-22 season --- a decision that agent Mark Bartelstein indicates that Beal will need time to consider. "There are moments in a career where there are big decisions to make, and Brad will work through everything and figure out the right thing to do," Bartelstein told ESPN. "There are nothing but great feelings for Ted [Leonsis], Tommy and Scott [Brooks]. They've treated Brad wonderfully."
Beal has another decision looming this week, as the Wizards can offer Beal a three-year, $111 million contract extension on Friday. Although Bartelstein said he and Beal have remained in contact with newly appointed general manager Tommy Sheppard as well as Ted Leonsis, there is no rush to come to an agreement on the upcoming offer. “We’ll talk to the Wizards. We’ve been talking to the Wizards. Those are things we have to figure out in terms of what’s the right thing for everyone,” Bartelstein said. “We’re not locked in on specific dates in terms of all that. There’s nothing that needs to be decided at this moment. There’s a lot for Brad to consider. Ted and the entire Wizards organization have been nothing but spectacular to us.”
On July 26, the Wizards can officially offer Beal a contract extension worth approximately $111 million over three years. But there is a long list of clues that suggest he will not take the offer.
Beal’s upcoming decision on a contract extension looms large over the team’s future. On July 26, exactly three years after Beal signed his supermax deal, the Wizards can officially present a three-year, $111 million extension. The team has previously indicated it plans to give Beal the offer, and both the player’s camp and the franchise have remained in contact throughout the summer.
A trade seemed like the farthest thing on Beal’s mind at the NBA Summer League. He squeezed in quality time with the Wizards before jetting to Atlanta to support his own AAU team. Inside Thomas & Mack Center on UNLV’s campus, Beal laughed easily and appeared relaxed, not at all stressed about his future. Still, many within the NBA wonder if this happy scene will merely stay in Vegas. “If he doesn’t accept [the extension],” said a rival general manager, “it will be a big blow to Washington.”
Beal, who has two years remaining on his five-year, $127 million contract, told The Washington Post that he was “definitely” open to discussing an extension. “I have thought about it but I haven’t really full-out processed it,” he said, in an interview at the Barker Hangar following his award presentation on Monday. “I still have two years left. We just drafted Rui [Hachimura] and I want to see what we do in free agency before I make the ultimate decision. I haven’t even been offered it officially. Until that happens, I’ll wait and think about it. I’ll have an ample amount of time to process everything and make a decision when the time is right.
“I’d be naive to say I wouldn’t be [interested in extension talks]. Washington is where I’ve been the last seven years, going on eight. It would be great to play in one place forever. But at the same time, you want to win and make sure you’re in a position to do so. I’m definitely going to evaluate who we hire as the GM and who we pick up on the team. All that plays a factor.”
Albert Nahmad: Players eligible for “super-max” this summer if earn All-NBA honors: - Kemba Walker: 5/$221M (starting 2019-20) - Klay Thompson: 5/$221M (starting 2019-20) - Bradley Beal: $4/191M (starting 2021-22) - Damian Lillard: 4/$191M (5/$247M if signed next summer) (starting 2021-22)
If Beal gets All-NBA honors, he will be eligible for a supermax contract. It wouldn't begin until the 2021-22 season, but it is projected to be worth $194 million over four years. His deal would start at over $40 million annually. The Wizards already have John Wall signed to a supermax deal, which kicks in next season. He will be making $43.9 million in 2021-22. He and Beal would account for roughly three-quarters of the salary cap that season.
As long as Beal, who turns 26 in June, remains an All-Star talent and under contract, they have options. If they felt they had to trade him, they could get plenty of assets in return. It would just be a difficult and possibly ugly process to go through. It all hinges on the All-NBA announcement. If Beal doesn't make the team, everyone moves on like nothing happened. If he does get it, everything changes for him, the Wizards and their offseason.
The Wizards could, in theory, sign Beal to a supermax and just deal with it later. They would have two full seasons before the contract begins. By then, Wall should be healthy and have at least a full year of games under his belt and maybe more if he returns next season. But delaying the inevitable is not a sound strategy. If extending Beal backfires either as a singular move or in conjunction with Wall's deal, it could strap the franchise for many years to come. All of this makes a supermax offer in the event Beal becomes eligible potentially a decision so massive it could be the most important call the next GM makes in their entire tenure in Washington. And that GM may have to make that decision within months of taking the job.
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Windhorst went on to say the Nets aren’t coming off asking for a big return for Durant in a trade. And that Brooklyn has no leverage with other teams, same as Durant has no leverage with the Nets. “I think what we have here is really a study of leverage. First off, the Nets do not have leverage in trade talks with other teams. They are not giving them the offers that they want. They see no reason to increase them. So, they’re not making any progress there,” said Windhorst. “Kevin Durant clearly does not have leverage with the Brooklyn Nets. He is asking for things: ‘Get me traded. Fire the coach. Fire the GM.’ He is being told no. So, when you have denied leverage, you have a stalemate.”
When it comes to Simmons, his unique skill set is incredibly enticing, but his best ability will be availability. Fortunately, according to ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith, that won’t be a problem for Simmons in 2022-23: “You and Kyrie and Ben Simmons — who, by the way, news flash here. I ran into Ben Simmons. He and I had a nice conversation … I support the brother. I had a problem with him not playing. That’s the past. He’s ready to go. He swears he’s ready to go.”