Former Atlanta Hawks general manager Wes Wilcox appeare…

Former Atlanta Hawks general manager Wes Wilcox appeared on NBA TV on Monday and discussed six players who could be traded now, later this season and in the future. The list included Oklahoma City point guard Chris Paul, Cleveland Cavaliers power forward Kevin Love, Washington Wizard shooting guard Bradley Beal, Minnesota Timberwolves small forward Andrew Wiggins, Memphis Grizzlies small forward Andre Iguodala and Booker. Wilcox put Booker and Wiggins in the “future” category. “Of these six names, Chris Paul and (Andre) and Iguodala, we know that they’re in the trade market and they’re available,” said Wilcox during NBA TV’s 2019-20 regular-season schedule release special Monday. “Of these other four names, we can probably take (Andrew) Wiggins and (Devin) Booker into the future,” Wilcox continued.

More on Andrew Wiggins Trade

Towns and Russell were taken Nos. 1 and 2, respectively, in the 2015 NBA draft and have been close friends since high school. Towns is really high on adding Russell, sources said. It would take moving Andrew Wiggins or a combination of Jeff Teague and Gorgui Dieng to open the space needed for Minnesota to sign Russell. The Nets would have two days to match a signed offer sheet to retain Russell.
Wolfson added the discussion "never got even an inch off the ground" in terms of working toward an actual agreement.
MARC STEIN: The Spurs' asking price for a player regarded as the league's most menacing two-way force when healthy, for the moment, is thus still said to be rather high. But I have little doubt Ujiri is willing to trade any Raptor on the roster if he finds a deal he likes — even after LeBron James' departure to the Western Conference. The Raptors, I'm told, held exploratory discussions in the summer of 2017 with Minnesota on a deal that would have been headlined by DeRozan and the Timberwolves' Canadian swingman Andrew Wiggins. No trade materialized, but it reaffirms the notion that not even DeRozan, at the peak of his career, is untouchable in Toronto.
One name brought up often in recent days has been Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan, who could become available should the Raptors look to make wholesale changes following a third straight loss to LeBron James and the Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference playoffs. Wiggins’ Canadian roots could make him an attractive option for the Raptors and good reason to hope that they could get the best out of him while playing in his backyard. In some ways, DeRozan could provide a good blueprint for Wiggins to follow. DeRozan didn’t become a real star in the league until his fifth year and has proven to be effective even though he isn’t a knockdown three-point shooter. But his game is also similar to Butler’s, so it is hard to see how a swap like that would give the Wolves what they are looking for in terms of a different look aside their leader.
But from what I can gather, Wiggins doesn’t have a huge amount of value on the market right now. He’s about to start a five-year, $148 million contract and is coming off of a less-than-convincing fourth season in the league. If there isn’t a great market, they might be better off just holding on to him and trying to keep developing him. I still think that the best possible outcome for the Wolves is to get Wiggins to blossom into the kind of All-Star caliber player the organization envisioned when he was signed to the max extension.
Nate Duncan: Do you think that Andrew Wiggins, a couple of years from now, is on [the Minnesota Timberwolves]? Do you think there's a chance they might move on from him, given how he's played this year? Marc Stein: I think that's something that people will be looking at and I think other teams will be coming after him. Because he's, at best, gonna be the third option if you're playing with Jimmy Butler and Karl-Anthony Towns. [....] I don't think there's any question that Wiggins' future is gonna be talked about. He's under contract now—it's a big number but for some teams, that appeals, to be able to get a guy when there is contract certainty and you know you've got him, there will be teams who want to trade for that.
Melissa Lidberg: Is there precedent for someone demanding a trade in the first year of a five-year deal? Darren Wolfson: He hasn't demanded one yet!
any word on what the Wolves offer was to The Cavs for Kyrie yet??? Darren Wolfson: Not Wiggins, and it'll take him and more.
It would only take more in a sense of making the cap work, right? Cavs would love to get their hands back on Wiggins. Darren Wolfson: Word is they want more than Aldrich to make the $$ work. They want something of substance in addition to Wiggins. No trade w/ MN is close.
The Timberwolves explored several trade options in June, including for Chicago star Jimmy Butler, but Thibodeau, also Minnesota’s president of basketball operations, now sounds as committed as anyone in the franchise to his young trio. Outside the organization, executives wonder about Minnesota’s inclination to keep all three. But within the franchise, there is no question: management and owner Glen Taylor will do whatever it takes financially in order to win. “I love our core three guys, and what I love most is their work ethic, their dedication to work,” Thibodeau said. “They understand the level we need to reach, particularly defensively, and their work shows that they will work to get it right. We understand that it’s going to take some time and we need to work at it each and every day.”
It is unclear whether the Miami Heat have the assets to swing a deal for one of Minnesota’s three young studs, and it’s surprising that the Timberwolves are reportedly willing to move any of them so early in the season. In any case, whether the T’wolves decide to keep the trio intact or the Heat refuse to put together an adequate trade proposal, it remains unlikely that Towns, Wiggins or LaVine will be taking their talents to South Beach.
Justin Pinotti: You mentioned no Zach LaVine for Tobias Harris. Think Wolves would have interest in him for something else? Good PF fit potentially IMO. - Darren Wolfson: Told Tobias Harris isn't that available. You'd have to blow them away. #Twolves aren't moving Karl-Anthony Towns, Andrew Wiggins, Zach LaVine.
Storyline: Andrew Wiggins Trade
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“When I got traded, I remember I felt betrayed,” Deng told Tshabalala. “Because the guy who traded me obviously ruined the team — and I don’t mind saying that now, I would never speak about him as a person — but just the decisions that he’s made. Because it changed the whole course of what we were trying to do. When Derrick got hurt, we really felt that we were going to win a championship, but when he broke up the team, you just feel hurt because we became so close as a team. But we had a mission. And that was to wait for Derrick to get healthy and go at it again, but he decided to just break up the team.”
“I gave up a lot of money to stay with the Bulls,” Deng said to Tshabalala, alluding to a past contract (presumably, a six-year, $71 million extension he inked as a 23-year-old in 2008) he said he signed with the team against the wishes of some in his camp, who wanted him to explore more lucrative options elsewhere. “So when they came back again for my next contract, the year before the contract, me and Thibs went in and we talked to Gar Forman, (who) at the time was the GM, and we said, I want to sign right now before the free agency comes up and other people offer money. And at the time, he said — I was 27? 28? — he told me to take another team discount. “And I remember saying, ‘Why would I take another team discount? Why is there a discount again?’ You know, because this is when I was an All-Star. So he said, ‘We want you to take a team discount.’ So I was like, ‘OK, what’s a team discount?’ and he didn’t discuss anything. And at the time, it didn’t make sense for where I’m at, at the best of my career.”
“Thibs was upset, and Thibs kept telling them (the front office), ‘Sign Lu, I need you to sign Lu,’” Deng told Tshabalala. “So when the [2013-14 season] started, I wasn’t signed for the Bulls, and Thibs decided he was going to make them know how important I am for the team, and ran everything through me — and this is why I love Thibs still today… I was averaging 20 (points per game) at the time when I got traded. When the front office saw that I was averaging 20, obviously now, everybody wanted to pay me more money. So they decided that it was better to trade me before they lose me for nothing.
Terrence Ross ( @TerrenceRoss ) gives us a sneak peak at the NBA players’ game room/lounge. It includes PlayStation 4’s, arcade games, ping pong tables, a pool table, and a seating area.

Storyline: Orlando Bubble
For Wizards point guard Ish Smith, though, it’s no big deal at all. He was asked about the food and gave the type of humble, down-to-earth answer you would expect from him. “I’m okay. I’m low maintenance and I’m thankful for anything and everything. You’re asking the wrong person. You might have to ask somebody else who lives a little bit more of a high maintenance life,” he said. “For me, I’m thankful, I’m blessed. They bring us food, we eat it. I have no problems.”
My thoughts on wing depth were addressed in the previous question. As for those specific prospects, Okoro’s athleticism and defensive instincts stand out the most to the scouts I’ve talked to. Both Karnisovas and Eversley said they like players with defensive versatility, a trend in today’s NBA. Okoro projects to be able to guard point guard to power forward. Questions exist about his shooting ability, but he’s also got an improve-at-all-costs mindset.
Eagles receiver DeSean Jackson started the firestorm by sharing anti-Semitic quotes on Instagram he attributed to Adolf Hitler, saying Jews “will blackmail America” for their “plan for world domination.” He praised Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, pegged an anti-Semite by the Anti-Defamation League and Southern Poverty Law Center. Durant liked a Jackson post complimenting Farrakhan after his July 4 speech, where he ripped Jews and said blacks shouldn’t take a coronavirus vaccine because Bill Gates and Dr. Anthony Fauci are trying to “depopulate the Earth.”
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The parents of a California man who died after a security guard allegedly put a knee on his neck filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the security company and Sacramento police. Mario Matthew, 39, was “unreasonably restrained” by private security guards and later responding officers inside of Golden 1 Center, home of the NBA’s Sacramento Kings, on July 2, according to a federal lawsuit filed Tuesday by the man’s parents, Elizabeth Avila and Mark Matthews.
July 9, 2020 | 7:52 pm EDT Update
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