The league values such planning. They contacted the Cli…

The league values such planning. They contacted the Clippers in the offseason and asked if the team had any general road map for when Leonard might sit out, sources said. The Clippers replied that they could not provide one at that point. In the end, all these decisions — whether a team may rest a healthy player in a game normally subject to the resting policy, or whether a player designated as “injured” truly is injured — can be sent as high as Adam Silver, the league’s commissioner, for approval. “We are not getting gamed,” Spruell said.

More on Load Management

The league also has allowed for some wiggle room on what constitutes a "high-profile" national TV game, sources said. A game on NBA TV might not be the same as a game on ESPN or TNT. A Golden State Warriors-New Orleans Pelicans game without Zion Williamson and most of Golden State's foundational stars might no longer qualify as "high profile" -- providing teams more flexibility in resting healthy players.
Derek Bodner: Joel Embiid, asked whether his limited minutes due to foul trouble might help keep him fresh for tomorrow night's game against the Heat: "Load management. That's some BS...I'm tired of sitting. I just want to play."
Rose: "It was just a different time in the sports world, period. Now we have the term “load management.” I don’t think that I would’ve taken it as far as Kawhi, as far as like they’re really being cautious about his injury or whatever he has. But if load management would’ve been around, who knows? I probably would’ve still been a Chicago Bull by now. But it wasn’t around."
When he played 40 minutes and 44 seconds in a 21-point loss to Sacramento earlier this month, David Fizdale bristled at a question about the possible strain on Barrett. Where some saw overzealousness from the head coach in bringing the rookie back into the game in the fourth quarter with nine minutes remaining — and 34 minutes of wear already on Barrett — Fizdale saw no reason to question him. “He’s got the day off tomorrow,” Fizdale said in a pique. “We gotta get off this load management crap. Latrell Sprewell averaged 42 minutes for a season. This kid’s 19 years old. Drop it.”
Now, it’s cutting out some shootarounds entirely. Through Donovan’s first three seasons in Oklahoma City, the Thunder coach had a borderline religious devotion to the gameday morning ritual that’s slowly dying around the NBA. Call it the Thunder’s way of “load management.” “I think when people immediately go to the stat sheet and say, ‘Oh my God, that guy played 38 minutes tonight,’ … I think everybody looks at the minutes played per game and they think, ‘Oh, load management,’” Donovan said. “But they don’t understand all the other things that lead up to that, too.”
That changed against the Sixers on Friday. Paul played the entire fourth quarter and all five minutes of overtime. The Thunder were plus-11 in those minutes. Does Paul get those minutes if the Thunder has a shootaround that morning? The Thunder didn’t have a morning shootaround Friday and instead chose to have a walkthrough at the arena later a few hours before tipoff. Not having a shootaround is another way to manage the workload of players. “There’s also load management around practice, shootarounds, schedule, travel … that all plays a factor into it,” Donovan said.
Playoff-bound teams rest players at the risk of losing games or even home-court advantage... as do lowly ones like Memphis, which rested 20-year-old rookie Ja Morant for a weekend home loss. I've got an idea! Play fewer games! Oh, right, that would mean less revenue and lower salaries. That's one thing that unites owners and players: No one wants that.
Dane Moore: Russell Westbrook now officially ruled out of tonight’s matchup with the Timberwolves. Westbrook is resting the second night of the Rockets back-to-back. There will be a lot of Ben McLemore and Chris Clemons for Houston in Westbrook’s absence.
Cuban believes load management is a good way for teams to preserve their stars for the playoffs. He suggested that in the 1980s and ’90s the quality of basketball was hindered by fatigue, with the league’s top players near exhaustion when the postseason arrived. “Worse than missing a player in a game is missing him in the playoffs,” he said. “And if you go back to the days where guys played 42 minutes a game and there were 10 guys in the league playing 40-plus minutes, the quality of the game wasn’t nearly as good. We gave them a hard time about being worn out or saving themselves for the fourth quarter, and now all the data says you maintain their usage levels over the course of the season with rest, so you’re seeing guys playing 36 minutes, which is a lot.
Spurs coach Gregg Popovich began the practice of load management several years ago, giving aging veterans Tim Duncan and Tony Parker nights off. Cuban said Popovich wasn’t exactly trying to be an innovator, it was gamesmanship. “Pop was doing it just to [mess] with people,” Cuban said. “Now it’s all data-driven. Let’s just do it to mess with the league and our meal ticket, the fans, and just do something just because it might be interesting. We spent so much money on not just analytics but biometrics to know how smart we could be.”
Mark Berman: Mike D’Antoni says Clint Capela out tonight and tomorrow night. Danuel House out tonight, 50-50 tomorrow. Says Russell Westbrook will probably be out tomorrow for load management. Says Ben McLemore in the starting lineup tonight. pic.twitter.com/eez9WdBdBG
Micah Adams: Clippers are 0-3 in games without Kawhi. Raptors went 17-5. I’m not saying it’s significant. But it’s not insignificant.
However, maintains Fergus Connolly, a sports science expert and author of “Game Changer: The Art of Sports Science,” using load to assess injury risk has challenges. “The first challenge is that it’s hard to accurately define load,” Connolly says. “Is it a number defined by the previous game, or is it the chronic level for a season?” Connolly adds that it’s impossible to assess load by one simple number, formula or metric. The calculus of load is not only different for each player but also is a moving target that varies by time of season, age and even by opponent. Kawhi Leonard’s load tolerance today is surely different than it was five years ago, in ways that are difficult to understand. “It’s like painting by numbers when you don’t have all of the numbers,” says Connolly, who has served as a performance director in the NFL, “And trying to fill in those gaps with incomplete data.”
Says Tim DiFrancesco, former head strength and conditioning coach for the Lakers: “Even if we can come up with a number that measures on-the-court load or stress, we don’t know what might be contributing to load off the court — lifestyle stressors like travel, sleep or family problems.” When looking at injuries, in any sport, there’s the idea that a range of injury exists, from “not preventable” at one end, to “preventable” at the other end. Some injuries — Aron Baynes falling on Stephen Curry’s hand, for instance – are difficult to foresee and impossible to prevent. Those injuries have little to do with load and a lot to do with luck.
Without that constructive stress, muscles, tendons and ligaments might not be ready to take the demands of running, jumping and cutting for 82 games. Players coming off the bench, thrust into a starting role, might actually be at greater risk of injury than starters, at least if they haven’t been regularly hitting high intensities in practice. “For me, load management is more about what a player does to prep for the load of the season,” emphasizes DiFrancesco, “and sitting on the couch and resting might actually leave a player less prepared to handle load. Because of that, it’s likely, when a player sits out a game, he might have instead done a focused workout that day.”
Ben Fischer: WarnerMedia Chair Jeff Zucker on NBA ratings weakness this season: “I think the combination of injuries and sitting out has been an issue, and I think that’s concern, and hopefully that will get addressed over time.... "I think the league has some influence over teams and i would like them to exert that influence." WarnerMedia Chair Jeff Zucker on load management in the NBA. #SBJSMT
Tim MacMahon: Doc Rivers says he expects Paul George to make his Clippers debut tomorrow in New Orleans. Will Kawhi Leonard play on the second night of a back-to-back? “I don’t know yet,” Rivers said. “That was a good question. Nice try.”
Amid the ongoing debate about resting players in the NBA, count Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban among those openly willing to support load management. "The problem isn't load management, per se," Cuban told reporters in Boston on Monday. "I think teams have to be smarter about when to load manage. I'm all for load management. Worse than missing a player in a [regular-season] game is missing him in the playoffs."
"It's all data-driven," Cuban said. "We're not going, 'OK, let's just mess with the league and our meal ticket to fans to do something just because it might be interesting. We spend so much money, not just on analytics for predictive reasons, but also for biometrics so we know how smart we can be. "The dumb thing would be to ignore the science."
Cuban said that while it might be frustrating to see players on the bench now, it all pays off in the postseason. "You actually get more of your stars [in the playoffs]," Cuban said. "You get shorter rotations of more of the guys playing in the playoffs, which is what you want to see anyway, right?"
Tom Moore: Brett Brown says Al Horford resting tonight has been in the works for a while. Sounds like Joel Embiid could sit Wednesday in Orlando with Horford starting. #Sixers
Storyline: Load Management
More HoopsHype Rumors
February 1, 2023 | 8:59 am EST Update

Matisse Thybulle drawing interest from Warriors, Kings

Multiple NBA sources said the Golden State Warriors have had internal discussions about Thybulle and that they do like him as a defensive stopper. The Sacramento Kings are also reportedly monitoring his availability. A league source confirmed the interest, saying Kings coach Mike Brown is a fan of Thybulle, who would add a defensive presence to Sacramento’s starting lineup. The Kings (28-21), who surprisingly sit at third place in the Western Conference, are pondering upgrades for a postseason push after an NBA-record 16 straight seasons without a playoff appearance. The Kings’ and Warriors’ interest makes sense and is something to pay attention to.
James was asked if he thought the achievement — a hallowed record in not just basketball but across all professional sports — was now “heavier” with it being so close. “It’s not getting heavier,” he said. “I’m going to do it. I mean, it’s just a matter of time when I’m going to do it. It’s not heavy. I’m not going anywhere. I’m going to be in this league for at least a few more years. “I’m going to do it. It’s not heavy at all.”
James’ ability to sustain at such a high level remained otherworldly, as the 38-year-old star is now 89 points away from passing Abdul-Jabbar’s record scoring mark that has stood for nearly 39 years. “He’s just a kid who’s grown before our eyes, the last 20 years at this level, has done nothing but play the right way and make the play that’s in front of him,” Lakers coach Darvin Ham said. “Regardless of how much he’s been criticized for a while for not taking the last shots and the overpassing, he’s just making the right plays. You saw that again tonight.”
The question is how much more can he pad his soon-to-be scoring record? James hasn’t played more than 67 games in a season since 2017-18, but even if he plays 60 next year and sees a modest dip in his scoring average to 25 points per game, we’re looking at 1,500 more points, which would make him the first player to clear the 40,000 barrier. If he plays one more year after that to get in his run with Bronny, that would likely add another 1,500 or so and set the record at 42,000 points.
In other words, breaking LeBron’s record will probably require averaging more points per game than he did, because playing as many games in this era will be extremely difficult. (It’s also possible the league shortens the schedule at some point.) Additionally, James got an extra year at the beginning of his career relative to today’s players because he came to the league straight from high school, which is not possible at the moment. The league could potentially reverse its position, of course, but for now it’s another impediment to any potential record-breaker. James got a 1,654-point lead on the field in that 2003-04 season in Cleveland.
In a reminder of how generational of a talent James is, he also passed Mark Jackson and Steve Nash to move up to fourth on the all-time assist list. There’s a reasonable chance he moves into first in points and fourth in assists in the same week, illustrating both his remarkable durability and his uniquely fitted offensive repertoire. “It’s amazing because that’s just what I love to do and get my guys involved,” James said of passing Jackson and Nash. “I try to put the ball on time and on target with my guys throughout the course of my career and I’m with another great group that allows me to see the space and see the floor and I’m able to get it to them and try to get it to them with the right type of pass. But they have to make the shots and they’ve done a great job of that. Not only this season, but over the course of my career, so it’s pretty cool.