You can listen to the whole podcast here, but the most …

You can listen to the whole podcast here, but the most noteworthy takeaways happened when he discussed how he felt about Howard’s final season on the Magic in 2011-12 (via HoopsHype): “We had a culture and when that culture got broken, that’s when the team started to break up,’ Nelson said. “There were different reasons why the culture broke, but the main thing was certain guys weren’t seeing eye-to-eye anymore. The goal changed. Social media started coming into play. The brand started getting bigger for individual guys. Winning wasn’t even the priority at that time, in my opinion, for certain guys. It kind of got blown up because of that, in my opinion. I’m sure you’ve been around and you’ve seen it. But it kind of deflates you and you’re like: ‘Ugh, I don’t feel like coming to practice today because it’s not going to be as fun.’ Our practices used to be fun. When we were winning, everything was fun. But when things got a little tougher and adversity hit, certain guys just didn’t want to be there anymore.”
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January 20, 2020 | 9:26 pm UTC Update
January 20, 2020 | 8:44 pm UTC Update
January 20, 2020 | 8:04 pm UTC Update
Atlanta Hawks forward Chandler Parsons suffered several serious and permanent injuries after getting hit by a drunk driver last week … and now his NBA future is in jeopardy, his attorney claims. The 31-year-old was on his way home from practice around 2:00 PM on January 15 when a man — who admitted to drinking and had alcohol in his car — hit Parsons and caused a 3-car wreck.
Storyline: Chandler Parsons Injury
Parsons’ attorneys, John Morgan and Nick Panagakis, say he may never fully recover from the accident … claiming he suffered a brain injury, disc herniation and a torn labrum. The attorneys released a statement on Monday, saying “The at-fault driver created utter chaos on the roadway, needlessly endangering the lives of countless motorists; he now stands charged with DUI, admitted drinking, had alcohol in the car with him, passed out after causing a three-car crash at 2:00 PM on a Wednesday in a busy intersection, seriously injuring and potentially ending Mr. Parsons’ career as a professional athlete.”
“Chandler is having a difficult time accepting the consequences of the defendant’s reckless conduct on the roadway.” “Chandler was in peak physical condition at the time of the wreck. He is now working with a team of doctors to regain his health, and at this time, his ability to return to play is unclear. Our focus right now is on helping him make a full recovery, while we also work to hold any and all responsible parties fully accountable.”

January 20, 2020 | 7:44 pm UTC Update
But now James is sitting on 33,563 career points. Entering Monday’s game against the Celtics in Boston, he is, fittingly, 81 points away from eclipsing Bryant’s mark of 33,643 career points. “All records are meant to be broken, right?” said Carmelo Anthony, one of the two other active players who rank among the NBA’s top 25 career scorers. “If there was anybody who was going to do it, it was going to be him.”
As he moved from one station to the next, I approached and asked if he was paying attention to the NBA’s all-time scoring list. Bryant, who will be eligible for induction into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame this fall, tilted his head. “What’s going on with it?” he asked. Unsure if Bryant was truly out of the loop, or if he was simply being coy, I explained the numbers and that James was on the verge of taking his place in history. “Oh, sweet!” Bryant said, his face brightening.
January 20, 2020 | 7:39 pm UTC Update
Atlanta Hawks small forward Chandler Parsons has retained Morgan & Morgan, the nation’s largest plaintiffs law firm, following a January 15 auto crash in which he suffered multiple severe and permanent injuries including a traumatic brain injury, disc herniation and a torn labrum. Parsons was traveling home from practice shortly before 2:00PM when he was struck by a driver who was arrested for drinking and driving. Mr. Parsons’ attorneys John Morgan and Nick Panagakis released the following statement: “Morgan & Morgan has been retained by Mr. Parsons to help preserve all of his rights and navigate the legal process on his behalf in the wake of this terrible automobile crash. Chandler was seriously injured in this crash, which never should have occurred.
“The at-fault driver created utter chaos on the roadway, needlessly endangering the lives of countless motorists; he now stands charged with DUI, admitted drinking, had alcohol in the car with him, passed out after causing a three-car crash at 2:00PM on a Wednesday in a busy intersection, seriously injuring and potentially ending Mr. Parsons’ career as a professional athlete. “Chandler is having a difficult time accepting the consequences of the defendant’s reckless conduct on the roadway. “Chandler was in peak physical condition at the time of the wreck. He is now working with a team of doctors to regain his health, and at this time, his ability to return to play is unclear. Our focus right now is on helping him make a full recovery, while we also work to hold any and all responsible parties fully accountable.”
The title bump may have looked ordinary, but it is a highly visible marker of a growing trend — as Silicon Valley types have flooded NBA ownership ranks, front offices have adopted their ranking hierarchy with no consistency among organizations. A handful of positions are a major departure for the sport: The Oklahoma City Thunder, for instance, has vice presidents of “insight & foresight” and “identification & intelligence,” while former sportswriter Lee Jenkins serves as the Los Angeles Clippers’ “executive director of research and identity.”
The wave of fancier job names stretches far beyond the Lakers, though — the titles on business cards of personnel around the league have become more scrutinized and yet more inscrutable. And yet they mean something in the NBA. “Oh, it matters,” said Bobby Marks, a former Brooklyn Nets assistant general manager who now works as ESPN’s front-office insider. Travis Schlenk, the Atlanta Hawks’ president of basketball operations, echoed the sentiment. “I know they’re important, and they’re important to my staff,” he said.
The overwhelming majority of NBA executives plug away under often-cloudy job descriptions. A “basketball operations assistant” can function as a salary cap expert or a general office aid. As analytics departments continue growing, teams introduce new positions under new monikers every month. The job title, of course, only means so much. Even if they’re all chasing the same goal. “The most important title,” Sheppard said, “is the one that Toronto has.”
Sixers forward Mike Scott echoed Harris’ sentiments about how special it is to play on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day. “He did so much for all the races, trying to bring everybody together, a real positive person in our history and it feels good to play on that day,” Scott said before Saturday’s game. “Sharing a court of all different races, it doesn’t matter who you are, it is bringing everybody together.”
January 20, 2020 | 5:00 pm UTC Update
Glushon and Ainge spent the weekend negotiating. On Oct. 21, they announced they had agreed to a four-year, $115 million extension. “That was a unanimous decision,” Stevens says. “What Jaylen has done, as a young player in the role he’s been in, on the winning team he’s been on, there are not a lot of comparables. We want him to be here for a long time.” It was the first rookie-scale extension the Celtics had handed out since signing Rajon Rondo to one back in 2009. “That meant a lot,” Brown says. He adds, however, that signing the deal “definitely wasn’t the easiest decision. It wasn’t as easy as people think. I had a lot of inner battles.” Again, he doesn’t want to reveal too much. Only that: “Anytime you make a decision that affects your future, you gotta do your due diligence. This is the only time as a player I have this ability to think about myself. But ultimately I made the right decision.”
Even though he’s posting career-best numbers and is in the midst of establishing individual records, Terry Rozier isn’t about to proclaim he’s arrived. Far from it in fact. “I feel like I ain’t proved s— yet and it’s not to the doubters,” Rozier said. “I give a damn what they say. It’s more to my loved ones, to my family. People that look at me and I really know how much they care about me. Those are the ones that I really want to show what I can do. And like I said, I haven’t showed them nothing yet and I want to keep improving.”
Fein did not get a chance to sit down and chat with his new guard at the time but spoke highly of him, highlighting his leadership and his feel for the game. “His leadership,” Fein said of Chiozza’s greatest advantage. “He can control the game, control the tempo and has a great feel for the game. He is a big time competitor. He had a lot of success in college, a lot of success last year, and even this year in the G League. Someone on the defensive end who can get into people, make people uncomfortable, and run the team on the other side. I am looking forward to working with him.”
Martin believes his defense is the main area he will make an impact for Long Island … and maybe get some time with Brooklyn. The Nets two-way vows to bring his defensive energy to every game he plays in and will serve any role Shaun Fein and the coaching staff want him to fill. “I bring a little bit of everything, mainly defense,” Martin said. “I bring energy and I know I can bring that every game. Most of the time you know your shot is not going to be there every night but your defensive energy has to be there. I feel like that’s one thing I can bring everyday. Just bringing that energy, bringing that defense, and let the offense follow.” “Bringing whatever the team wants me to do, whether it is on the defensive end or the offensive end and rack up as many wins as we can.”
Who would you say you are the tightest with on the team? Terry Rozier: I’m cool with everybody. I’ve always been like that. Even last year, like I’m cool with the guy that even is the most non-cultured on the team. I’m cool with Willy (Hernangomez), I’m cool with Malik (Monk). I would probably say those two the most. Billy and ‘Lik. Just their everyday spirit. Malik is kind of different. He’s real chill, funny, will say whatever comes to mind. Willy is annoying, but funny at the same time. He likes to have fun with it, a good guy. So he reminds me a lot of Daniel Theis. a guy I’ve been around and you just see that click.
But in late September last year, he decided it was time for a change. He’d recently returned from a trip to China, where he had suited up in the FIBA World Cup for Team USA. He was excited for the tournament. The previous season had worn him down, and he was giddy about the opportunity to rack up some successes, to remember what it felt like to have fun on the court. “I wanted to win that so badly,” he says. “It would have been good for me.” Brown played well, but the team did not, losing twice and failing to qualify for the medal round. “I was devastated,” Brown says. He spent the night after the first defeat to France awake in his hotel room, replaying the game in his head.
“I’m not sure. Right now, (the Timberwolves are) struggling a little bit so we have to get back and (we’re) trying get in a playoff run,” Wiggins said. “That’s my main goal right now. And after that I’m going to decide on Canada basketball. “I never really got a chance to talk to too (many) of the guys, you know. I have great respect for coach (Nick) Nurse and I plan on having a conversation with him eventually.”
Nurse, the Raptors coach who also leads the Canadian team, said he had talked a bit to Wiggins about the possibility of playing and expected a decision shortly. “We’re trying to get all the … best players in, all the best Canadian guys, and it looks pretty good,” Nurse said. “Most of them are already on board and excited about playing. It’s a heck of an opportunity. It’s a chance to go to the Olympics, and you get to play the qualifier in your home country.”
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