As her late father and former Lakers owner Jerry Buss g…

As her late father and former Lakers owner Jerry Buss groomed her to have a larger role with the franchise, he counseled Jeanie on how to ease that transition. At some point during those conversations, Jerry Buss offered advice that involved former NBA Commissioner David Stern. “My dad told me that if I ever needed help in the future that David would be somebody I could count on,” Jeanie Buss told USA TODAY Sports. “He always was there for me.”

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“He stood up when everybody else didn’t know what to do,” Buss said of Stern. “We were all scared, concerned and uninformed because it was all happening in real time. But he didn’t flinch. He stood up and allowed Magic to come back into the league. He squashed the fears of spreading the virus through hugging and shaking hands, He really led us into an area that nobody really knew we were going. But he never blinked an eye. He stayed as a leader.”
So Jerry, how did this hit you? And how do you think you’ll look back on the part he played in building the NBA? Jerry West: He led this league through some turbulent times, and had a great idea about how the league should be in terms of players’ responsibilities to the public — his ability to work with the players (and) The Players Association was pretty remarkable when the league was not (succeeding). He had an incredible 30-year career in the NBA. I had a great relationship with him. We didn’t always agree on things. … I would call him from time to time and (share) things I saw that maybe needed to be addressed. And he was very courteous about listening to them, even if he may not believe what you were saying. But he was a great leader for a lot of years. And some of the things that you see in the NBA today, obviously, is part of his thought process, and the ability to get owners to acquiesce to what he thought was important for the growth of this league.
I’ll leave you with this, Jerry. If you had one word to describe his impact on the league, what would it be? Jerry West: Well, there’s probably — leadership, in a time of need. His unique leadership in a time of need, when this league was really undergoing a lot of stuff that wasn’t always privy to the newspaper. The drugs, the declining attendance, every bit of turmoil that this league has had was under his leadership, every bit of it. And he handled that so beautifully, I can’t tell you. He was strong-willed, and his leadership through those times got this league back up and running at the highest level that we had ever seen it.
Kyle Goon: LeBron compared David Stern's basketball stature to James Naismith -- a "visionary" who "made the game global". "We had our battles, that's for sure, trying to figure it out. But at the end of day we wanted to do whatever it takes to help grow the game."
Jeremy Lin: RIP David Stern. Condolences to your family. Thanks for pouring so much into making the NBA an amazing league that I could play in for 9 years as well as growing the beautiful game of basketball to the world!
Stern screamed and cursed and pounded boardroom tables, treating the commissioner's seat like an emperor's throne. It's hard to imagine Stern at rest, but he has died at 77. The former commissioner suffered a brain hemorrhage on Dec. 12 and was in critical condition until his death on New Year's Day. For most of his life, Stern kept coming and coming and coming. Privately, owners talked tough about how Stern worked for them. In his presence, many of them cowered. At once, owners, management and players were grateful to Stern for franchise valuations and salaries growing exponentially -- and fearful that failing to submit to his will could result in legitimate retribution, including unfavorable referee assignments in the playoffs.
In every elevator shaft, every room, Stern was a force of nature. For all the volatility and blunt force, there was an incredibly progressive, generous and compassionate side to Stern. The NBA played a leading role in HIV and AIDS awareness. Stern refused to let the league become overrun with irrational fears in the wake of Magic Johnson's diagnosis in 1991. Minorities and women were elevated into prominent positions in larger numbers and greater frequency than in other professional leagues. There are stories of NBA employees with family crises that credit Stern with remarkable acts of kindness and generosity. In his pre-NBA days as an attorney, Stern took on and won a massive housing discrimination case for African Americans in Northern New Jersey, and did so pro bono.
The past really is a foreign country, as L.P. Hartley once wrote, and David was one of its best correspondents. In retirement, he had the biggest backlog of the history I cared about, both recent and ancient. He could regale me with tales of how New York Knicks centers continually came up short against Bill Russell, and clue me in to how recent CBA fights shaped the modern salary cap. It started when I reached out for a story, roughly two years ago. I said in my email that he could call me at any hour, not expecting a response. One day, I checked my phone and saw I had a message. An annoyed-sounding voice said, “Hi Ethan, this is David Stern, calling you, at any hour. But this is obviously not a good hour.”
Really, the stakes for a fight were never too small. In our last conversation, I used the word “solipsistic” to describe the worldview of celebrities in a social media era. He expressed doubt that I was using the word correctly. I fought back, taking his momentary silence as a victory. “Ah ha! I finally got one on you!” I triumphantly crowed. Five minutes later, I was talking about something totally different, when Stern interrupted, blurting, “THE VIEW OR THEORY THAT THE SELF IS U-ALL THAT CAN BE KNOWN TO EXIST??” “Ach,” he said with another sigh. “That’s hardly what you were saying. Hardly.” I had to meet him halfway and say another word might have been slightly better, just so we could finally move on.
The response from those in hockey was positive. They certainly didn’t close any doors on the idea and, 17 years later, Las Vegas received its expansion team. Things were entirely different down the street. “(Stern) looked at me and said, ‘Over my dead body will Las Vegas ever get a team with legalized sports betting there,’ ” Goodman recalled Wednesday. “He was a curmudgeon. He was brilliant. He was a very, very nice man. Over the years, I became the little dog nipping at his ankles about Las Vegas. Wherever he went, I went. I imposed myself on him. “I told him all the time he was wrong about Las Vegas. He was always very nice in the way he said, ‘No.’ We disagreed in the beginning but became good friends. He was a decent person. I really liked the guy.”

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Larry Bird: "My family and I send our sincere condolences to David Stern’s family. There are no words that can really describe the far-reaching impact of Commissioner Stern's brilliance, vision, fairness and hard work over so many years. When you think of all that he accomplished worldwide on behalf of thousands of players, so many fans, all of the jobs he created for team and arena employees and all of the people that benefitted from the many layers of growth in the sport and industry that David spearheaded and then passed on to others, there is no doubt Commissioner Stern lifted the NBA to new heights and he will be greatly missed by all of us."
Stephen Curry: Will never forget the words you spoke this day! "With the 7th pick" changed my life forever. Thank you and your family for your leadership and commitment to growing the game of basketball around the World. Forever grateful. RIP Commisoner Stern!

https://twitter.com/StephenCurry30/status/1212522376631443457
Liz Mullen: NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell: "All of us at the National Football League are deeply saddened by the passing of David Stern. David was a driving force in sports for decades and helped the NBA soar to new heights around the world." Full Statement:

https://twitter.com/SBJLizMullen/status/1212520497096744961
Jared Weiss: Statement from Celtics on passing of David Stern: "David was a towering figure whose accomplishments in building the NBA will never be forgotten. His leadership brought the game of basketball to people all over the world and helped change what the NBA could mean to people..."
Christian Clark: Pelicans call David Stern a "catalyst in professional basketball returning to New Orleans in 2002" in a statement on his passing. "His commitment...was further shown when he guided the franchise through an ownership transition to Tom Benson in 2012."

https://twitter.com/JHarden13/status/1212510323762253829
Michael Jordan: “Without David Stern, the NBA would not be what it is today. He guided the league through turbulent times and grew the league into an international phenomenon, creating opportunities that few could have imagined before. His vision and leadership provided me with the global stage that allowed me to succeed. David had a deep love for the game of basketball and demanded excellence from those around him – and I admired him for that. I wouldn’t be where I am without him. I offer my deepest sympathies to Dianne and his family.”
Chris Paul: The game lost a leader today. Extending my prayers to David’s family and loved ones in this time of grief 🙏🏾

https://twitter.com/CP3/status/1212503667527573511

https://twitter.com/rudygobert27/status/1212504164368027648

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Candace Buckner: #Wizards Coach Scott Brooks starts his pregame availability by expressing his thoughts on the passing of David Stern: "We've lost a legend, an icon. Someone I had a great deal of respect for as a player... and when I became a coach."
Pau Gasol: Today the #NBAFamily lost a legend, a leader that changed our game for the better. A father, a husband, a friend. RIP #DavidStern, you will forever be missed. 🙏🏼 pic.twitter.com/0dColRyTOT
Enes Kanter: Prayers up for David Stern and his family! Rest In Peace 🙏 pic.twitter.com/iCM8e5iL9n

http://twitter.com/mcten/status/1212479351230517248
Adrian Wojnarowski: David Stern — the Hall of Fame ex-NBA Commissioner — has died at 77 years old. He oversaw tremendous growth in his 30 years as commissioner, retiring in 2014. Stern had been hospitalized since a brain hemorrhage on Dec. 17.
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Goran Dragic talked to the Slovenian press before Saturday’s prep game against Montenegro and explained his motivation about his return to the Slovenian national team. “I predict the semi-finals, but then anything is possible”, said a smiling Dragic, who is ready to defend the title he won together with a young Luka Doncic back in 2017. However, after five years things are different and Dragic understands it: “In my opinion, I will play a little less minutes, it will not be at that level. I don’t know how much I played, 36 minutes per game? Everything will depend on how I feel. The role will definitely be different. I was Batman, but now I’ll be Robin. The most important thing will be to make sure we have good chemistry and be a leader on the court and lift guys up when it’s most difficult. My role remains the same, Luka’s may have changed a bit more, but I believe that everyone has their own role in the national team and that there will be no problems. We all understand each other, we are one big team, and that’s why we can make a good result. That chemistry is what other teams don’t have.”
Dragic had also to convince the Chicago Bulls to let him play, something that was not ideal for them: “When I had a medical exam with Chicago and sat down with them, they said I’d rather not play. I said I’d rather and in the end it’s the player who decides. I had to go to Chicago, undergo a medical examination and everything else. When you go to a medical examination, you always wait for the results, because you never know what can happen”.