Oleh Kosel: Mike Malone has been tossed out! Wow. His a…

Oleh Kosel: Mike Malone has been tossed out! Wow. His assistants had to physically restrain him before exiting the arena. He wasn’t happy with the late foul call on Brandon Ingram — although it seemed to be the right call albeit late.

More on Officiating Complaints

Taking to journalists after leading the Milwaukee Bucks to the win against the Boston Celtics on Thursday evening, Giannis Antetokounmpo confessed that can improve in terms of earning fouls. “The way NBA is built, it wants you to flop. It kinda wants you be weak,” the Greek Freak noted, “When you’re strong and going through contact, they don’t call the foul.”
Attempted 20 free throws for the night anyway. Made ten of those shots en route for the team-high 30 points. Accounted for 17 rebounds, seven dimes and a pair of blocks as well. “That’s not who I am. I am just going to going to power through the contact,” he added, “Sometimes they are going to grab me or push me. I got to show it more. I think I’ve done a better job showing it more.”
John Denton: According to the NBA’s Last 2 Minute report, @Phoenix Suns G Devin Booker should have been called for a foul when @Orlando Magic C Nikola Vucevic posted up with 22.1 seconds left. Down 2, Vucevic lost the ball after “Booker (PHX) wraps Vucevic (ORL) in the post,” per the L2M report.
Pacers coach Nate McMillan said Jimmy Butler should have been given a second technical foul, resulting in an automatic ejection, after T.J. Warren’s ejection during Wednesday’s Heat win at Indiana. “They said [Warren] was clapping at Butler, but Butler was also kissing at him,” McMillan said. “None of the officials saw [Butler blowing kisses]. Both guys should’ve been ejected in that situation. Emotions, they’re going to happen.”
Only Warren was ejected, for clapping his hands in Butler’s face after Butler was called for an offensive foul against him. “We needed to see some fight,” McMillan said. “We needed to see some scrap. I like that Warren was trying to get aggressive defensively and Butler reacted to the pressure defense. I don’t think it was anything dirty by Warren. He didn’t slam him to the floor or anything. Butler responded by getting into his face.”
Brad Townsend: @luka7doncic on Rick Carlisle’s assertion that teams are beating the s*** out of him. "It's true, I'm not going to lie, but, you know, it's just basketball. It's a physical game. If the refs see it, they're going to call it. If they don't see it, they're not going to call it. But I've just got to keep going. "
Andrew Greif: A technical foul has been called on Kawhi Leonard. He was being really vocal toward official Eric Dalen earlier, wanting an out-of-bounds call to go the Clippers' way. Doc Rivers spoke to officials at half's end about the tech.
The NBA has seen a rise in offensive numbers over the last 10 years, as the league has prioritized its rules to cater to high-scoring games. While the trend has helped offensive output, it has caught the ire of both Spurs coach Gregg Popovich and Warriors coach Steve Kerr, who hopes to see subtle rule changes going forward. "I would like to see a slight reversal in what we're trying to accomplish as a league," Kerr said prior to Tuesday's game against the Spurs. "I think we've gone overboard in rewarding offensive players. And what I mean by that is we've rewarded offensive players for fooling the officials and attempting to fool the officials."
"I think we need to get back to the point where players need to earn fouls and earn it by beating their man," Kerr said, "and drawing contact in a natural way and not flopping and flailing and grabbing arms and that's going on all over the league. "We have to decide as a league, are we going to call fouls that people would laugh about at a pickup game? That's what we have to decide ultimately. And to me that's where we've gone overboard."
David Locke: Alex Jensen will take over for the Utah Jazz. 2nd time Quin Snyder has been ejected in his career
Scott Kushner: Alvin Gentry ejected. Two techs both called after Hart didn’t get an And-1. But Gentry has been in refs ears all game long.
Kellan Olson: Monty Williams said today he thinks the league did a disservice to Devin Booker for his technical foul yesterday. They were told Booker cussed someone out and Williams and Booker both said that's not the case. Williams said it really bothered him and it wasn't fair to Devin.
Sean Grande: The NBA's L2M report confirms Josh Richardson fouled Jaylen Brown on the Tatum inbound with :25.7 left. The no-call, arguably in a dead-ball situation, instead resulted in a turnover essentially ending the game. The streak of L2M reports making no one feel better continues.
The NBA announced Monday that it has denied the Houston Rockets' protest of their 135-133, double-overtime loss to the San Antonio Spurs last week. At issue was a James Harden breakaway dunk with 7:50 remaining that would have given the Rockets a 104-89 lead. The ball whipped through the net and back over the rim before bouncing off, and the officiating crew mistakenly ruled that Harden missed the dunk and denied Houston coach Mike D'Antoni's attempt to challenge the call.
The league did announce that it has disciplined all three referees from the game for misapplying the coach's challenge rule. The NBA also said it will work with its competition committee to develop procedures to ensure the situation does not reoccur. D'Antoni was unhappy the officials were disciplined. "I hate it for them,'' he said. "They just made a mistake. We all make mistakes. So I hate it. That's probably the worst part of it. They're trying to get it right, and I'm sure they had good intentions.''
Mark Berman: Mike D’Antoni on #Rockets protest being denied by NBA:”I didn’t think we were going to win. It is what it is.” (On the 3 refs being disciplined) “I hate it for them.They just made a mistake.We all make mistakes. That’s probably the worst part of it.They’re trying to get it right” pic.twitter.com/rusJP4Br14
Ben Golliver: NBA has denied Rockets' protest of recent loss to Spurs. Adam Silver agreed referees "misapplied rules" but determined there was "sufficient time to overcome error" & didn't grant "extraordinary remedy" of protest. Three refs were disciplined for erring on Coach Challenge rule
The Wizards feel like the opposite isn’t happening. Beal gets hit, but it’s not ruled a foul. Then, the same play happens on the other end and Beal ends up getting whistled for hacking an opposing player. “For me, off-ball is something I wrestle with refs all the time about because you’re supposed to have freedom of movement and half the time, I don’t even have freedom to go touch my teammate on the shoulder if I want to,” Beal said. “So, it’s just those things that are frustrating. Things that are blatant, obvious, should be called and (they’re) not called. But us as a team, I gotta be better at being physical, getting more open, stop complaining and we just gotta be better at screening for each other, me setting screens, and just figure out ways. I just can’t keep accepting it.”
Tim MacMahon: Luka Doncic acknowledges that he’s often too animated with officials. “Sometimes I’ve got to calm down and just go to the next play,” he said.
Tom Orsborn: Pop reacts to Rockets protest: "There are calls missed for both teams all through every game. And players miss shots & coaches make bad decisions & you move on. There's never 1 play you can single out & say, ‘That’s the most important thing in the game & that’s why won or lost.'
After officials upheld Toronto Raptors wing OG Anunoby’s charge against still-shuffling Boston Celtics star Kemba Walker on the fourth night of the NBA season, Raptors coach Nick Nurse said from a TD Garden hallway, “I’m 0-for-2 on challenges, and I can’t believe it. I don’t have any idea what I’m doing here. Zero.”
“You see it gradually going up, so I think they are making improvement on successful challenges,” Joe Borgia, the NBA’s senior vice president of replay and referee operations, told Yahoo Sports of the rising success rate for coaches over the season’s first six weeks. “Now, the hard thing about it is, just because they were successful doesn’t mean it benefited them. ... So, I can’t imagine how difficult it is on them.”
Yahoo Sports reached out to all 30 teams seeking input from coaches on their feelings about the challenge through the first quarter of its inaugural season and the strategies they are using to maximize it during this trial campaign. Most declined to go on record, some of whom have publicly denounced it. One coach threw his endorsement behind the newly implemented tactic: NBA Coaches Association president Rick Carlisle. “I believe that any time you have a mechanism that could potentially correct an error in an NBA game that it’s a positive thing,” the Dallas Mavericks coach told Yahoo Sports. “I believe it protects the integrity of the competition, so I like the rule, and I believe as time goes on more and more people will feel the same way.”
Multiple coaches, however, have yet to see the benefit of the challenge. Asked what improvements he might make, Golden State Warriors coach Steve Kerr said, “I would tweak it by getting rid of it altogether. “In fact, I would get rid of all replay if it were up to me, because these stoppages in play just aren’t good for the game,” Kerr told Yahoo Sports. (FYI: His five successful challenges so far trail only Boston Celtics coach Brad Stevens.) “I’d rather see a good flow in the game. We stop the game for so many reasons, and yet even with replay, we don’t get all the calls right. It’s impossible to get all the calls right in the NBA. It’s such a fast game, and there are so many bang-bang calls that could go either way, so even with replay you see plays on tape all the time that you think you got a raw deal on. In my mind, there should be no replay. “We should just live with the results,” added Kerr.
Tim MacMahon: Sources: Rockets’ hope is that final 7:50 will be replayed with Houston up by 15 points. Rockets have no expectation that NBA would award them a win based on Houston actually outscoring Spurs in regulation, which was a possibility raised by a Rockets source in wake of the loss.
The Rockets prepared to file a protest of Tuesday’s loss to the Spurs, a person with knowledge of the team’s plans said, with an argument that will cite the James Harden dunk that did not count as an example of a “misapplication of rules.” It will also cite subsequent errors in officials’ failing to grant a coaches’ challenge, though the primary argument is with points not being awarded following a made basket.
Welcome to the opening weeks of the NBA's coach's challenge. ESPN asked head coaches from almost half the league's 30 teams for their input on the challenge system. The views ranged from hostile to constructive, but there wasn't an endorsement to be found. But for all the frustration and bewilderment the new rule has created across the league, don't expect it to go the way of the NBA's synthetic basketball.
Houston had been optimistic in the wake of the loss that the NBA office would take action without a protest being necessary. However, sources said the Rockets are leaning toward filing a protest to ensure that the NBA office will have to make a ruling.
NBA rules require a protest to be filed within 48 hours after a game. Sources said the NBA office has started conducting an investigation that could take longer than the 48-hour window. The Rockets contend that they should either be awarded the win -- because they actually outscored the Spurs in regulation -- or that the final seven minutes, 50 seconds of the game be replayed at a later date. League sources, however, scoffed at the suggestion that the Rockets would be awarded the victory.
The Rockets have 48 hours after the game in which to file a protest and will wait for more feedback from the NBA before determining how they will proceed. On Tuesday, on the way to losing a 22-point lead, a dunk by James Harden was disallowed after the ball worked its way through the net and around the front of the rim and nearly in again. The subsequent loose ball was ruled to have gone off Harden. The Rockets still led by 13 with 7:50 to play and were up by 16 shortly after before allowing the Spurs to come back and tie the game and eventually win in overtime.
Albert Nahmad: Rockets have 48 hours (from end of game) to file an official written protest, which must state grounds and include a $10,000 protest fee (refunded if they prevail). Both teams will then need to submit any evidence within 5 days, after which Adam Silver will decide within 5 days.
The Rockets are weighing protesting the game, a person with knowledge of the team’s thinking said, but will wait to hear from the NBA if it rules without a protest. If a made basket was not credited, the Rockets could be given a two-point win in regulation or more likely have the remainder of the game replayed from that point on. In either case, winning a protest is extremely rare. “They said the ball hit James and went back through, so it was goaltending on James,” coach Mike D’Antoni said. “So, I said, ‘I challenge that.’ Then, I didn’t get a response. Then, another guy said it wasn’t a goaltending. It went out of bounds on us, so I said, ‘I’ll challenge that.’ I didn’t get an explanation. I got nothing.
The Houston Rockets are optimistic the NBA office will take action after referees mistakenly did not count a James Harden dunk in Tuesday night's 135-133 double-overtime loss to the San Antonio Spurs, sources told ESPN. The Rockets are hopeful the league office will either award the victory to Houston due to the Rockets outscoring the Spurs in regulation or order that the final 7 minutes, 50 seconds be replayed at a later date, sources said.
Harden's breakaway dunk with 7:50 remaining would have given the Rockets a 104-89 lead. The ball whipped through the net and back over the rim before bouncing off, and the officiating crew mistakenly ruled that Harden missed the dunk and denied Houston coach Mike D'Antoni's attempt to challenge the call. "When the play happened, Harden goes in for a dunk, and then the ball appears to us to pop back through the net," crew chief James Capers told a pool reporter. "When that happens, that is basket interference. To have a successful field goal, it must clear the net. We have since come in here and looked at the play. He dunked it so hard that the net carried it back over the rim a second time, so in fact it did clear the net and should have been a successful field goal.
According to ESPN Stats & Information research, the most recent example of teams replaying part of a game happened on March 8, 2008, between the Miami Heat and Atlanta Hawks. Four months earlier, the Hawks defeated the Heat 117-111 at home in overtime, but the official scorer incorrectly ruled that Miami's Shaquille O'Neal fouled out with 51.9 seconds left in the game. The league decided to have Miami and Atlanta replay the final 51.9 seconds before the teams' next scheduled game, and the Hawks ultimately won 114-111.
Officials reviewed the play and agreed that Williams was wrongly called for a blocking foul. What they didn’t acknowledge was the clear charge by Randle, ruling that there was no foul on the play. Randle wasn’t awarded a free throw, but his bucket still counted. This left Stevens flummoxed. Video showed Stevens pleading with referee Josh Tiven before giving up and appearing to say “I’m done with these f---ing challenges. This is unbelievable.”
Before digging into his Thanksgiving meal with family on Thursday, Cleveland Cavaliers head coach John Beilein looked back at the film from Wednesday’s loss against the Orlando Magic. Well, one specific area: The turnovers. Mainly, the seven travel calls against his team. “I have a call in with the league as well and we are going to talk about them,” Beilein said prior to Friday’s matchup against the Milwaukee Bucks at Rocket Mortgage FieldHouse. "We are going to talk about where the travel is happening. You can see, if you slow it down several times, you can see there’s some. But we didn’t all of a sudden start traveling. It hasn’t been called and it was called. That’s what I think we have to figure out.”
On the one hand, the Lakers' 14-2 start to the season is the best that any of James' teams has ever achieved through 16 games, edging the 2016-17 Cleveland Cavaliers' 13-3 mark. On the other hand, James' 27 field goal attempts without attempting a single free throw was the most shots he's ever taken without earning a trip to the line, according to research by ESPN Stats & Information. "It's frustrating," said Lakers coach Frank Vogel. "LeBron's going to the basket all night long. He took nine 3s, but he's in the paint all night long. ... When your guy's attacking the basket the way he is and getting zero free throw attempts, it's something that can be frustrating."
Tom Orsborn: DeMar on not getting the call after Hood whacked him in the face: "Yeah, I'm frustrated. I still don't understand it. Clearly, I got hit in the face before anything else happened. I don't know. I guess I got to be dramatic or flail or something." #Spurs
DeRozan was still upset by the call after the game, stating Hood hit him in the face prior to any possible push off. "As soon as we say something out on the court, we get a tech," DeRozan said. "We're held responsible for things we say about the refs, but when refs cost us the game, I don't know what we get. An apology later on after it's reviewed?"
Tom Orsborn: More from a clearly frustrated DeRozan on the officiating: "I guess you got to go out there and flail and flop and sell it these days. That’s what a lot of players are doing, and they get the calls. But you try to be aggressive and physical, I guess that gets overlooked."
Tom Orsborn: Last word from DeRozan: "I’m not a good actor. I am just out there playing hard, and I expect the refs to make the right call. Like I said, I guess I need to take some acting classes." #Spurs
Josh Lewenberg: Once again, Nurse careful with his post-game words, but not impressed with the officiating. On Doncic: "He got all his points from the foul line. I thought he was treated very well tonight."
From Hield’s perspective, there’s not much you can do when playing the Lakers at Staples. It’s a familiar refrain for Kings fans still seething over Game 6 from 17 years ago. “One call changed the whole game,” Hield said. “It could have gone either way. It be like that sometimes, when the home team is favored all the time, especially in LA.”
Hield was a bit more unfiltered. He was asked about the lack of free throws by the Kings, and he put the burden on the officials. “The refs don’t call no fouls for us, yo,” Hield said. “I don’t know what to do.”
There won’t be outrage at the level of Game 6 of the 2002 Western Conference Finals against the Lakers, but there were plenty of angry Kings after a game in which they shot only nine free throws — two through three quarters. Still, the Kings had a chance in the final seconds before the game was “stolen.” “The game came down to one play,” Hield said. “Sometimes in that situation you’ve got to let the game play out. I don’t think it was a foul the other way. So ask (referee) Rodney (Mott) what he think.”
How he fell — or was tripped by James — depends on which locker room you were in, obviously. “I think we know what’s going on,” Barnes said. “But for us, it’s moving past this, getting better, and that’s all I’ll say about that.” Kings coach Luke Walton was much more diplomatic in discussing the final play. “We ran a play, we had a chance, we didn’t make it,” Walton said. “All we try to focus on as a team is what we can control and what we can control is execution, knocking down shots, making the extra pass.
Jason Jones: Bogi: "It’s always the referee’s decision to call or not call (a foul). Sometimes you get calls, sometimes not. Homecourt advantage maybe? Sometimes it goes like that, you know? But it’s over, we lost this game and we have to be locked in for Boston."
Jeff McDonald: DeRozan also said he was "highly surprised" at the game-sealing flagrant call: "Obviously I went for the ball, and made sure he didn’t get the ball up with the possible chance of an and-1. In my opinion, I thought it was a terrible call."
Several minutes earlier, Beverley expressed displeasure with the officiating. He was particularly perturbed about his sixth foul -- a call made when he bumped chests with Harden away from the ball and about 30 feet from the basket -- and a technical foul he received from the bench with 1:31 remaining. "I got a technical foul because I looked at the ref, I guess, too long, and I guess you can't look at people in this league now," Beverley said. "I don't know. I don't feel like that's fair. As a unit, we work too hard -- coaches work too hard, players work too hard, staff work too hard -- to prepare for each game, and to let a game come down to referees and free throws I don't think is fair. I think we deserved better, I think fans deserved better, and the people who paid their hard-earned money to watch us play, both teams, I think they deserved better also."
Keith Pompey: Joel Embiid on his controversial offensive foul on the #Sixers' final possession. “I watched the replay, I didn’t really see any push off. If you want to call that foul, especially at that time of the game, I think that’s kind of BS, especially because he was hooking me ...
Rivers said he thought Bledsoe pulled a fast one on the officiating crew. "That was awful," Rivers said afterward. "It was. They should've overturned it. That's why I hate the rule. Nobody wants to be wrong. Let me just say that. You have to overturn that. Unless Bledsoe fouled Lou with his face, there was no foul on that play."
Dwain Price: The NBA Last Two Minute Report showed that Dwight Howard should have been whistled for an offensive foul when he held Seth Curry on the play where Danny Green hit a 3-pointer at the buzzer to send last night's Mavs-Lakers game into overtime, where the LAL won 119-110.
Storyline: Officiating Complaints
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