The Chicago Bulls are making changes at the top, having…

The Chicago Bulls are making changes at the top, having reportedly launched a search to replace long-time executive vice president John Paxton and general manager Gar Forman. And the Dallas Mavericks may have a top-notch candidate. “Michael Finley would be amazing in that role,” Mavs owner Mark Cuban tells DallasBasketball.com. “Fin has had a huge impact on the Mavs. … Amazing.”

More on Bulls Front Office

Shams Charania: Sources: Pacers GM Chad Buchanan has decided to stay in Indiana and decline interview for Chicago’s top basketball operations position. Buchanan expressed appreciation and positivity about Bulls, but he and his family have been treated well in Indianapolis and opted to remain.
KC Johnson: Michael Reinsdorf’s goal is to build front office depth. Buchanan dropping off target list doesn’t change that. Bulls still hope to interview Nuggets GM Arturas Karnisovas, Raptors GM Bobby Webster, Heat asst GM Adam Simon with understanding final hire could make additional hires
With longtime tandem John Paxson and Gar Forman expected to be reassigned from their respective roles as executive vice president of basketball operations and general manager, the Bulls, led by president and COO Michael Reinsdorf, have zeroed in on four preliminary executives across the league. Sources tell The Athletic they are Toronto GM Bobby Webster, Denver GM Arturas Karnisovas, Indiana GM Chad Buchanan and Miami vice president of player personnel and assistant general manager Adam Simon.
More could be added to the mix, but the Bulls, sources say, will not pursue Toronto president of basketball operations Masai Ujiri or longtime Oklahoma City exec Sam Presti, marquee names some fans hoped the team’s frustrated ownership would present with a blank check. The team also will not look to high-powered player agents, an increasingly trendy approach and one that rules out Chicago-based Priority Sports founder Mark Bartelstein as a possible candidate.
The report mentioned Nuggets GM Arturas Karnisovas and Toronto GM Bobby Webster as two candidates to be interviewed, but a source told the Sun-Times on Friday that a lot of Reinsdorf’s focus has also been on Miami – not only in their front office personnel like vice president of basketball operations Adam Simon, but also mimicking the structure, as well as scouting several of their players that will enter free agency.
KC Johnson: Bulls also will seek permission to interview Heat asst. GM Adam Simon, per source. Initial round of interviews centered on Nuggets’ Karnisovas, Raptors’ Webster, Pacers’ Buchanan and Heat’s Simon. Other targets could emerge, but longshot scenarios of Presti/Ujiri won’t happen
Chicago ownership has discussed the plan with Executive VP of Basketball Operations John Paxson and GM Gar Forman, sources said. Paxson is likely to continue in an advisory role with the franchise; there are expected to be more ownership conversations with Forman about his future too, sources said.
The Bulls are planning to talk with several possible candidates to lead the franchise and plans to have a new leadership well before any possible resumption of play during the NBA's shutdown because of the coronavirus pandemic. Interviews will start next week and will be conducted electronically, sources said.
But it was behind the scenes that Forman started to misplay his hand. He quickly gained the reputation as a guy that was paranoid, turning his focus to keeping his job rather than doing his job. That meant inserting “spies’’ throughout the entire organization, as the Sun-Times documented back in 2017 with then assistant GM/coach Randy Brown being identified as one of many. Brown denied the allegation to the paper, but former Bull Rip Hamilton came out days later and confirmed the suspicions around Brown.
But it was behind the scenes that Forman started to misplay his hand. He quickly gained the reputation as a guy that was paranoid, turning his focus to keeping his job rather than doing his job. That meant inserting “spies’’ throughout the entire organization, as the Sun-Times documented back in 2017 with then assistant GM/coach Randy Brown being identified as one of many. Brown denied the allegation to the paper, but former Bull Rip Hamilton came out days later and confirmed the suspicions around Brown.
The only person I still have respect for in the Bulls organization is Doug Collins. I believe he should be used to find a new general manager and get a real NBA coach. Do you think there is any hope of this happening? — Tom H. According to multiple sources, Collins and Boylen had a falling out. Boylen, the sources said, no longer wanted Collins sitting in on coaches’ meetings. Collins is in the background for now.
And it also should be noted that the Bulls historically have not operated as a big-spending franchise when it comes to management. It would take upwards of $9 to $10 million to even get Presti to the negotiating table. The sniffing around I’ve done on this story leads me to believe that that’s not a route the Bulls plan to take. Things can change, and this process is a fluid one. But my educated guess is the Bulls will hire multiple people for a restructured front office and spend their money that way.
Daniel Greenberg: According to @thekapman on ESPN 1000: Oklahoma City Thunder general manager Sam Presti is the Chicago Bulls number 1 target. Kaplan: "That's the guy they want. They are prepared to pay him what it takes."
The Bulls are planning changes to their management structure this offseason and have spent weeks gathering input on potential additions for what one source described as “an empowered presence.” And while a team source insisted the process is in the early stages, multiple league sources indicated one name is gaining momentum---Pacers general manager Chad Buchanan.
Buchanan is widely known for his embrace of analytics. If the Bulls ask for and receive permission to interview Buchanan, his longstanding working relationship with Pritchard would seemingly indicate an ability to mesh with Bulls executive vice president John Paxson. As previously reported, ownership still values Paxson’s leadership and vision for the direction of the franchise. Paxson long has publicly stated he's willing to accept any role the franchise thinks is best for the Bulls.
Here’s a list of some potential problem-solvers for the Bulls to look at: • Mark Bartelstein: The former investment banker turned super agent founded Chicago-based Priority Sports and Entertainment, which represents 24 NBA first-round picks. Bartelstein has represented stars such as Bradley Beal, Gordon Hayward and Kyle Lowry. And with franchises such as the Lakers, Warriors and now the Knicks going the way of adding an agent to their front office, Bartelstein makes sense.
According to several NBA executives, the Bulls are in the early stages of adding a new face to the front office, with the position defined as a general manager “with a louder voice.’’ One executive said the talks with candidates have been through back channels, with no formal interviews taking place, but the search is believed to be widespread.
Chicago Bulls president Michael Reinsdorf has been gathering background on potential candidates to take over the franchise's basketball operations, sources confirmed to ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski. The John Paxson-Gar Forman front office leadership structure is unlikely to continue in its current form beyond this season, sources say.
According to several NBA executives, the Bulls have started the early stages of adding a new face to the front office, with the position defined as a general manager “with a louder voice.’’ One executive did say that the talks the Bulls have had with candidates have been through back channels, with no formal interviews taking place, but the search is believed to be wide-spread.
This would be in-line with a Sun-Times report back in November, in which the newspaper wrote that general manager Gar Forman’s job security was taking on water, with the organization’s senior advisor Doug Collins the loudest voice in a needed change. Collins has never been a big fan of Foreman’s, starting with questioning Forman for the hiring of Fred Hoiberg.
The hope for Paxson is this new hire will take over the media duties, allowing him to slip into the background. As for Forman, he is not expected to be fired, but reassigned into a scouting position, as the team is also looking to build up that department. The Bulls have long been known for having a small scouting department, and they plan on an expansion this spring.
KC Johnson: Butler: I got faith in (Bulls) management. They have a lot of young talent.
Paxson also said he isn’t going to dwell on his own job security. “I never worry about that,’’ Paxson said. “I communicate with Jerry and Michael [Reinsdorf], and they know where my head is at, my heart is at and what I’m trying to do. Look, that’s a what-if, and I’m not working on a what-if.’’
Joe Cowley: Paxson on concerns of his own job security: “I never worry about that,’’ Paxson said. “I communicate with Jerry and Michael [Reinsdorf], and they know where my head is at, my heart is at, and what I’m trying to do. Look, that’s a what if, and I’m not working on a what if.’’
Jerry Reinsdorf might be waking up — and not in the best of moods. According to several sources, the Bulls chairman is livid about the team’s 6-12 start this season and the continued sinking profile of the organization and is beginning to focus on general manager Gar Forman. The sources indicated this is not a recent change of heart for Reinsdorf, and that his unhappiness has been building after several questionable decisions.
Besides the Hoiberg issue, an ongoing mistrust between Bulls players and Forman, and a rebuild that still isn’t paying off in its third year, a source said Forman acted aloof toward a handful of former Bulls players in attendance last week when the team honored two-time All-Star forward Luol Deng, who retired last month.
That said, a source emphasized that nobody’s job is in imminent jeopardy, including Forman’s. Remember: Executive vice president John Paxson reclaimed his more central role as the face of the franchise and lead decision-maker with the Butler trade. Forman’s power within the organization isn’t what it once was, though ownership still values his scouting and negotiating ability.
John Paxson believes there is a path out of the basement, and even beyond mediocrity for this roster. The Bulls vice president of basketball operations made that crystal clear last week in his end-of-the-season address with the media at the Advocate Center. And while the line of skeptics is a long one, this is a front office that often tunes out doubt and criticism better than most organizations around the league. So when Paxson was asked just how this roster would be capable of that – especially void of a true superstar – that front office optimism was again on full display.
“The first part of that is through the draft and to get relevant again,’’ Paxson said, in explaining how the Bulls plan to build an elite roster. “I’m not ruling out Zach LaVine or Lauri Markkanen being significant players in this league. Zach just turned 24 and I thought Zach had a really good year, a really good year. He grew in a lot of ways where I think he’s going to get better. Lauri’s just still a young guy. As I’ve mentioned many times, the internal growth of our guys is a key part of that.’’
If that doesn’t happen, however, Paxson still sees a path. “I do believe when we establish winning again, that this city is a draw, that this organization is a draw,’’ Paxson said. “But that’s down the road. That’s why we made the deal at the trade deadline for Otto [Porter]. We felt that was a significant piece to becoming a much better basketball team. Over that stretch where we had him and we healthy, we were playing at a level that I could see us playing at in the future. So we’re trying to build toward what you’re talking about.’’
Joe Cowley: VP of basketball operations John Paxson will put the bow on this season today with a final media session. No Gar Forman of course. Expect little news to come out of it, considering Pax did a state of the union address in February. #wheresGar
Michael Reinsdorf: I would say it does go back into basketball operations. We’re always spending money to improve what we do from the basketball side. It’s why we made the decision to build the Advocate Center across the street from the United Center. That was over a $30 million construction. It’s why we have full-time physical therapists on the staff, why we’ve added additional trainers, why we add full-time nutritionists. We added a sports performance coach. We added Doug Collins. It’s why we’ve added to our analytics department the last couple years.

https://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/1095764315704098816

https://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/1095777133102878720
When did you first learn of the trade to Washington and what was your initial reaction? Bobby Portis: "It’s been a crazy two weeks. On Sunday [before the trade deadline], I was seeing rumors and stuff on Twitter and Instagram so I called my agent. I asked him, “Am I in trade talks?” My agent immediately called Gar Forman, who is the GM of the Bulls. Gar Forman said, “No, it would have to be a blockbuster trade. If we were getting [a superstar like] LeBron James or Kevin Durant, then yeah, we’d trade Bobby. But [otherwise], no, we’re not trading Bobby.” So Tuesday comes around and I’m at a G-League game when my agent called me. He said he got a call from Gar and [Bulls VP of Basketball Operations] John Paxson and they were asking questions like, “Does Bobby really want to be here? Does Bobby love being a Bull? Is he fine with his role?” I’ve been having a good year and I guess they were trying to see if I still wanted to be in Chicago. And, obviously, my answer was yes. Who doesn’t want to play for the great city of Chicago? Who doesn’t want to play at United Center and be a Bull?"
Bobby Portis: "On Wednesday, [I’m thinking], “I know for sure that I’m going to be a Bull after the deadline.” We had a game that night, so I went through my pregame routine, got taped, put my jersey on and sat in the locker room. Twenty-three minutes before the game started, one of the coaches told me that our head coach, Jim Boylen, wanted to talk with me. I walked into his office and I see Gar, Pax and Coach Boylen. They told me that they had agreed in principle to trade me. I asked, “Where am I going?” Then, they were hesitant to say. They finally said the Wizards. My heart dropped. My stomach dropped. I didn’t know what to think. I went back to the locker room and I was just hugging everybody, shaking everyone’s hand. Everybody was in shock because nobody knew I was going to be traded. That wasn’t even a thought anyone had considered because they loved me there. It was a crazy feeling. Then, my phone started going haywire, so I guess that’s when the news dropped and everybody found out."
I saw some of your tweets after the deal and I could tell you were upset with how this played out. Did the fact that the front office said you wouldn’t be dealt make it hurt more? Bobby Portis: "Yeah, it really hurts. They told me how much they valued me – that I was part of our core and that I was in the long-term plans. They told me how much they loved my energy, my heart, how hard I worked, how much I loved playing for the Bulls. Them telling me that I’m going to be there [through the deadline] and telling me that they want to work things out this summer [in restricted free agency]. We weren’t able to agree to a contract extension [before the Oct. 15 deadline], but they said they wanted to agree to something this summer before free agency hits. I think back on everything they told me. All this stuff was said and then I don’t even get notified when I’m getting traded? (pause) It’s just a crazy feeling. I guess I’m getting my first taste of the business. Business is business, I guess. I just don’t think it was done the right way."
Payne never made excuses for his erratic play. But he felt the fans’ love for Gibson, coupled with their subsequent disappointment in watching him be traded away, played a sizable role in how he was perceived from the start. “It was huge just because that was their guys,” Payne said of Gibson and McDermott. “Those were the fans’ guys. The fact that I come in and nobody knows me because I haven’t really played. And the way Gar and them portrayed me to be just the next greatest thing — you know. I mean, I’m a young guy. I haven’t played that many games. I’ve got to play to get comfortable also. So I feel like that’s all it was. And I came in on a playoff team. So it was also tough there. It’s just a tough situation.”
"We were all on board with (signing Parker)," said Paxson. "That's all in the past. We're not even going to worry about that. With the situation the way it is, we'll look and see if Jabari gets an opportunity. This thing will be fluid. We have a month until the trade deadline. A lot can happen. We feel really good about getting something done a month early. It's all in building a team. Given where we were at and where we are at today, trying to roll the dice on a young talent (like Parker) is not a bad thing. A lot of teams have had success doing that. The one thing that we continue to do and we think we're on the right track with is if something doesn't work, it's not going to be a long-term issue for us. We'll continue to operate that way."
"You make decisions and hope for the best," Paxson said about releasing Cameron Payne. "The reality is both Arch (Ryan Arcidiacono) and Shaq (Harrison) have outplayed him. They fit what we want to do. Cam had some struggles with his foot and trying to get him back. "What it does is it gives Chandler an opportunity to play. He'll play some significant minutes I would think," said Paxson. "He has to live up to the standards that Jim wants and we want. But he'll get opportunity. We still have some decisions to make with our roster. But our young guys will play. We're going to be starting a really young team. Looking long term and big picture, this is about the future. We think a year and a half into the big move we made (trading Jimmy Butler), we have to focus on that. It's hard to lose. You walk into the locker room and guys are competing, coaches are preparing, so that's hard. But from my seat, Gar's (Forman) seat, ownership's seat, we have to keep the big picture in mind. And that's what we're doing.
The Bulls have been burned this season, but it is part of the plan. "We're throwing them into the fire. We knew we were going to get younger," Bulls Executive Vice President of Basketball Operations John Paxson told reporters before Friday's game with Indiana. "We knew there would be struggles. We need to see what our young guys can do. Hopefully they'll respond in a competitive way. I keep telling Jim (Boylen, coach), 'This league is always about wins and losses, we always want to win. But right now we have to focus on other things.' We've said that all year long."
It's truly the first step forward after several steps back to try to get the franchise going in the right direction again. "We need to see growth," Paxson said about the young core. "We need to see how they play. We're a month into Jim's tenure now and I think they understand what's expected. So we're going to go out on the road here after these next two games (five starting in Portland Wednesday). That's a good time for a young team to get together. They're going to be hard games. We just need to see development. That's going to be a big key."
“I’m going to coach our team the best I can,’’ Boylen said on Sunday, when asked if having a say in personnel was important to him. “John and Gar know and Michael [Reinsdorf] and Jerry [Reinsdorf] know that I’ll support in any way I can, in any decision they need me to. The job they’ve given me is to coach the team and to try to get our guys compete every night. I’m trying to do that the best I can.’’
In the second meeting on Sunday, the idea of forming a leadership committee was discussed, multiple sources told ESPN. The idea is that in the future, those appointed to the committee would be able to act as a liaison between the players and coaches. It has been made clear that Boylen has been empowered and encouraged by Bulls management to use a firm hand in changing the Bulls' culture. The way Boylen handled Sunday's meetings has reinforced management's belief in the new coach, sources said. They are fully on-board with Boylen's tough-love leadership style.
“My job is to try to push our guys to a place they can’t take themselves,” Boylen said. “That’s pushing them outside their comfort zone. That’s what the Reinsdorfs are paying me for.” The fact Boylen cited ownership is telling. Phil Jackson praised Boylen to Bulls Chairman Jerry Reinsdorf after Boylen met with the Hall of Fame coach last summer. And according to team and league sources, executive vice president John Paxson and general manager Gar Forman raved to ownership about Boylen’s message during Sunday’s meeting, which Paxson and Forman attended.
KC Johnson: Exec VP John Paxson and GM Gar Forman both attended today’s 2nd meeting. This is significant because, along with Paxson’s previously publicly stated goal for Boylen to return next season, it underscores the organizational mandate Boylen feels he has to push players.
It​ wouldn’t be​ a John​ Paxson press​ conference about the​ boundless bummer​ that​ is the Bulls’ on-court​ product if one​​ reporter didn’t ask if Gar Forman were being fired soon. “Gar is absolutely safe,” Paxson said Monday.
Despite the recent shakeup at the head coaching position, the Chicago Bulls have shown no indication of making changes to their front office, including general manager Gar Forman, according to Shams Charania of The Athletic and Watch Stadium. “As of now, I haven’t heard anything to the contrary,” said Charania of Forman, per Bernstein & McKnight of WSCR 670 The Score.
Why does ownership have such long-term faith in management’s ability to rebuild this roster to open another championship window? Michael Reinsdorf: I have a lot of confidence in John Paxson and Gar Forman. I think they’ve done a great job. We made the decision to rebuild. And they secured the best possible deal. I was really happy with that trade. We took the 30th pick in Jimmy Butler and turned it into Zach, Kris and Lauri. That is pretty impressive. I think if you look at their history of our drafts over the years and you compare to other teams in the league, we’re near the top. At the same time, clearly you’re going to have failures when you’re picking players in the draft. Not everyone works out. Jerry West was one of the greatest general managers of all time. If you look at his draft record, you’ll see some players he probably regrets having drafted. You have to be foolish if you didn’t look at some of the really good picks that we’ve had. Jimmy Butler was a really good pick. We drafted Taj Gibson at 26. Bobby Portis was 22nd and look at who was drafted after him. You’re going to make some mistakes. But you also have to recognize the successes.
But clearly you’re aware that there’s a vocal segment of the fan base that has strong enmity towards management. The Fire GarPax billboard would be one example. Does that concern you? Michael Reinsford: You have to tune it out. I recognize our fans are passionate. They want the same thing we want — to win. Fans don’t always have all the information we have. Sometimes, you have to have a long-term perspective. When we made the trade for Jimmy Butler, there were a lot of people who didn’t like that trade. If you watched different commentators, it was not well received. I think now, if you go back and look at that trade today, most people would say that was a great trade for the Bulls. Depending on how Zach, Kris and Lauri develop, that could go from being a good trade to being an incredible trade. Time will tell.
KC Johnson: Bulls announcement

http://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/1035558627279556609
Mike McGraw: Paxson will not confirm nor deny the #Bulls made a promise to Hutchison. "He knew we liked him."
Armstrong represents Derrick Rose, Denzel Valentine, Draymond Green and Suns promising rookie Josh Jackson, among many others. He negotiated Rose’s monster, $185 million lifetime deal with Adidas. And ne now gets to do a different kind of business with Reinsdorf and Paxson, his former backcourt competitor on the Bulls’ first three-peat team. “It hasn’t been awkward at all. Actually, it’s been quite pleasant,” Armstrong said of negotiating with the Bulls. “I consider Jerry (Reinsdorf) a mentor. And I consider John a friend. I’ve known John for almost 30 years.”
KC Johnson: Pax: "Fred will be back, absolutely." This has been reported before. But first time he has said so publicly.
KC Johnson: Paxson on LaVine's play and upcoming negotiations: "We anticipated he'd have ups and downs."
KC Johnson: Paxson: "We need Zach LaVine to be a better basketball player." Said Dunn and Markkanen have to put work in to improve this summer too.

http://twitter.com/KCJHoop/status/977309460954742784
Nick Friedell: Thibs and the Bulls didn't end on good terms. Still a lot of hard feelings within the organization. But I still believe the Bulls missed a major opportunity both last year and tonight by not giving Thibs a video tribute of his own. I think many fans would have appreciated it.
Pressing the reset button on a franchise can be just as tricky as dealing with a faulty vending machine. Sometimes, the items get stuck in the dispenser, the machine doesn’t respond or the wrong button gets pressed and an unwanted item lands in the bin. When the Bulls decided last summer that it was time to move Jimmy Butler and begin their rebuild in earnest by acquiring LaVine, Lauri Markkanen and Kris Dunn in a draft-night deal, they understood the risks and accepted a pending struggle. But they didn’t want to be down for long and bank on a string of lottery picks to elevate them back to relevance. They wanted to stockpile some talent to make the losing more tolerable and the rebuild more manageable — but they might’ve stumbled upon a core. “I think the thing for us now is, we’re not starting from rock bottom,” Bulls vice president of basketball operations John Paxson said. “We’ve got these three young talents and you can throw Bobby Portis in, he fits the direction that we’re headed in. We feel we’re headed in the right direction. But we don’t want to oversell anything. We know to win at the highest level in this league you need the great players, and, hopefully, we’ve got one or two of them, somewhere on our roster, that we can grow with and hopefully make the decisions going forward to add to that.”
Fred Hoiberg says Zach LaVine has had a few good practices in a row. He will continue working out with the Bulls this week. Then the Bulls' front office and medical staff will meet with LaVine over the weekend and they will decide what the next step will be as far as playing goes.
Paxson, knowing the rebuild projected tough times ahead, wanted to promote transparency and accountability and be around players and coaches more to offer support. Forman, who recently spent 36 of 42 days on the road scouting, is a measured negotiator, valued by Paxson and ownership for his detail-oriented approach. “I picked John to rebuild when (Jerry) Krause left (in 2003) because he’s a leader. Nothing has changed,” Reinsdorf said Tuesday in a phone interview. “He’s a fine evaluator of talent. He’s a long-term thinker. He works well with the general manager. He works well with coaches. I’m a John Paxson fan. “Gar is great with agents. John hates to deal with agents. Gar is good at negotiating with the other general managers, but John was good at that too. Gar is great at cap knowledge and planning ahead. He’s an extremely detailed guy. That’s why we have the two jobs. And that’s a trend that teams are moving too. They realize you need two different skill sets.”
“I picked John Paxson to rebuild when (Jerry) Krause left (in 2003) because he’s a leader. Nothing has changed,” Reinsdorf said Tuesday in a phone interview. “He’s a fine evaluator of talent. He’s a long-term thinker. He works well with the general manager. He works well with coaches. I’m a John Paxson fan.”
Jerry Reinsdorf: “Gar is great with agents. John hates to deal with agents. Gar is good at negotiating with the other general managers, but John was good at that too. Gar is great at cap knowledge and planning ahead. He’s an extremely detailed guy. That’s why we have the two jobs. And that’s a trend that teams are moving too. They realize you need two different skill sets.”
Reinsdorf will turn 82 in two months. Asked why he signed off on another rebuild on top of his White Sox, he chuckled. “I figure I have at the most 15-20 years left and I’d like to win again,” he said. “I don’t like being caught in the middle. I think the rebuild is going great. We don’t want to be fooled by winning six games in a row. But we’re seeing our young players step up. We’re seeing (Nikola) Mirotic show what we thought we had in the first place. (Kris) Dunn is coming on. (Bobby) Portis is having a good year. And (Zach) LaVine hasn’t even played yet.”
Thibodeau wanted to maintain the ability to run his program the way he saw fit. Forman and Paxson wanted to have more say, specifically with regard to how many minutes star players such as Noah and Rose were playing in games. One of the things that irked Forman and Paxson most, sources say, was that they didn't feel they got enough credit for providing Thibodeau with rosters full of professional players. "There was definitely a disconnect between the coaches and management," Noah says now. "It was a little bit of a mess. And to be a championship team, everybody has to be on the same page. It was definitely a missed opportunity."
“I met in Treviso, Italy, the head of international scouting Ivica Dukan, who is the man who took Tony Kukoc to Chicago. His opinion has a real value within the Bulls organization. He is practically the no3 decision maker on the team. We talked and he said to me that Milos was the best player they could get. After a few days the GM, Gar Forman, called me. We had agreed to a contract close to $ 30 million for three years, similar to the one Bogdan Bogdanovic signed in Sacramento. My only objection was that I wanted Milos to have the chance to opt out every summer because I believe that he can all-star money. We were ready to sign and Forman wanted the deal for one more reason. There are many Serbs in Chicago”.
Storyline: Bulls Front Office
More HoopsHype Rumors
September 20, 2021 | 9:35 pm EDT Update
September 20, 2021 | 7:05 pm EDT Update