According to the NBA’s health and safety protocols, t…

According to the NBA’s health and safety protocols, teams that advance past the first round of the playoffs can reserve guest rooms that match the team’s roster size. Although it does not specify an exact number of guests allowed, the protocols state the number is “subject to Disney’s room occupancy rules and guidelines.” A player can determine anyone a guest so long as that person is not a certified agent. Most of the players’ guests are either wives, girlfriends and their children. Players can invite only one guest to a game, but they are allowed to bring small children. “It’ll just be good to be around some people that care about you, that you care about outside of your teammates,” Los Angeles Clippers guard Lou Williams said. “This environment can be a little mundane at times, so it’s nice to have some fresh energy.”

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Clippers center JaMychal Green plans to have his girlfriend and children visit should the team advance to the Western Conference finals. Yet, he still harbored concerns about his kids becoming stir-crazy on campus. People can swim, exercise, golf and fish on campus, but there are no options beyond those activities. Everyone also has to observe social distancing and mask-wearing rules. “I didn't want them to come here and get bored,” Green said. “My kids like to play and like to go outside. So there's really not much here to do.”
Usually, pets do not need to feel as entertained. They are used to quarantined life even in normal times. Unfortunately, they do not meet the criteria for guests. “I would love to have my dogs in here, but they are not allowing pets,” said Los Angeles Lakers guard Danny Green, whose fiancée will visit. “But I think pets would definitely lighten the mood. That would help if anybody who has any type of say-so to get some dogs in here.”
Where do you stand on the idea that playing games is a distraction away from everything that’s happening in the real world? Jared Dudley: I’ve always believed our voices are stronger and louder together. We’re doing this interview now because we’re playing. I have GQ doing an interview now just because of what’s going on. We’re not doing this interview if I’m at home. So it brings awareness. You hear VanVleet. You hear George Hill. You don’t know those names. The only names you hear when we don’t play are LeBron James or Kawhi Leonard, Steph Curry. You don’t hear these role players. Jaylen Brown? I just saw Jamal Murray put his Breonna Taylor shoes on the chair. You don’t get that if we sit. And then there’s the money. People say ‘it’s not always about money’ but money helps change communities. It’s not everything but it’s a big piece of what’s going on.
“I can’t talk about my brother’s headspace,” Kostas continued. “I don’t think he’s ever been to the point of (wanting to leave), but obviously everybody has had a hard time in here. He just had a son, and he misses his son a lot. So he’s thinking about him every day, but when he gets an opportunity to hold him in his hands, teach him how to walk and stuff like that. “So he knows that that’s important to him. But he also knows that what he’s trying to accomplish with his team is important to him too. So I feel like he’s in the right headspace, and it’s gonna be alright.”
Pat Riley has joined the Miami Heat at Disney World, but will be observing their playoff games from a distance. Arriving as part of the NBA’s second tier of guests, those not in the league’s bubble quarantine, Riley will take in the games at the Wide World of Sports complex from a distance, not allowed direct contract with players, coaches or those in the league’s highest tier of quarantine access. Heat General Manager Andy Elisburg also is with Riley in Central Florida, with the two with separate accommodations than the team’s at Disney World.
Chris Mannix: Brad Stevens said Gordon Hayward’s rehab from a sprained ankle is going “OK.” Says his gait still isn’t right. Says he expects Hayward to rejoin the team in the bubble, but he won’t rejoin and be ready to play right away.
Adrian Wojnarowski: The memo to "all governors and senior team basketball operations personnel" is meant as reminder of "higher standards expected" of them. As league memo said, given unique arena conditions, limited number of seats, small buildings, no crowd noise, this is "especially important."
On Monday, Danny Green will be reunited with his fiancee after nearly two months in the NBA bubble. NBA players whose teams have advanced to the second round of the playoffs can begin reuniting with select loved ones this week. So, for Green, that means seeing his fiancee as the title-contending Lakers prepare for the second round of the playoffs after eliminating the Portland Trail Blazers on Aug. 29. “My mind was in one place and my heart is in another,” Green said. “We’re tired of being in here. We wanted our families to be here, and some are on their way here. Some of our families are quarantining right outside the bubble. Some will be here in a couple of days. We know that is going to make things better for us.”
NBA referees are allowed to bring one guest, but two NBA referees told The Undefeated they didn’t think any officials would. One NBA referee said they would have to pay about $700 per day for their loved ones to quarantine, which would include a room, food and COVID-19 tests. “I don’t think anyone is doing it, so it hasn’t been a conversation for us since the day we got here,” one NBA referee told The Undefeated. Said another referee: “Our limit was one. You going to bring [your] wife and leave your kids at home?”
Toronto Raptors guard Fred VanVleet said players have debated about whether to bring children to the adult-laden bubble. VanVleet ultimately decided to bring his girlfriend, Shontai Neal, and their young daughter, Sanaa, and infant son Fred Jr. “I’ve been looking forward to seeing my family for a while now. Obviously, there was a big debate about whether to bring them,” VanVleet told The Undefeated. “It’s not the best of circumstances to bring two small children and have them quarantined and tested … But we made a decision for them to come. So, I just hope they are as excited to see me as I am to see them.”
Anthony Chiang: Erik Spoelstra says it will help players to get family and friends in the bubble at the start of the second round. But Spoelstra adds: "Can you write something about the staff being able to have our family join us?"
Gary Washburn: #Celtics director of player development Allison Feaster now has a cheering partner. BOS asst GM Mike Zarren is out of quarantine and in the house to watch BOS-TOR.
Rachel Nichols: Only because of the Bubble...Clippers Coach Doc Rivers is courtside watching his son Austin play in tonight’s Rockets-Thunder game, less than 24 hours before LA tries to wrap its first-round series against Dallas.

https://twitter.com/Rachel__Nichols/status/1299854993747394560
The two-time NBA Executive of the Year traveled across the country because he wanted to experience the unprecedented situation. Well, that was one reason, as there were other objectives in mind. "Pro scouting. I'm a big in-person guy, and I got to see 12 games in three days. I saw 16 teams play," Myers explained to reporters last week. "Usually as a general manager, we don't do a lot of pro scouting. I only see teams when we play them. And the season got cut short, and certain teams I never saw play.
Bob Myers: "It was tremendously valuable for me to be out there. And then also -- the league is constantly changing. Just to watch what's going on in the playoffs, and I want to have the best chance of understanding where the league is going."
Josh Robbins: Due to his left hamstring strain, Aaron Gordon has left the NBA bubble, a Magic official said. Gordon sustained the injury on August 5 and hasn’t played since.
Tania Ganguli: NBA referees are assembling to begin marching around the campus in support of the players who took a stand last night. “We’re here because we feel like our group is a representation of America, or what America could be. ... This is not right vs left, this is right vs wrong.” pic.twitter.com/2yU5FIeyDO

http://twitter.com/taniaganguli/status/1298968681813245952
Tania Ganguli: Disney employees are lined up clapping and cheering for the people marching in support of NBA players’ protests against racism and police brutality. The group includes not just referees but some team attendants and others living on campus. pic.twitter.com/VeUjdm4CQg
Vincent Goodwill: Source to @yahoosports: “This is Lord of the Flies now- 2020 edition” A lot of tension between players, It’s been building from inside the bubble
Barkley went on The Dan Patrick Show on Wednesday and essentially said PG13 had no right to speak about his bubble anxiety ... given the hardships other Americans are currently going through. "I don't think guys making millions of dollars should be worried just because they're stuck in a place where they can go fishing and play golf and play basketball and make millions of dollars," Barkley said. "That's not a dark place. The thing that just happened in Wisconsin, the things happening with this pandemic, all these people losing their jobs, those people are in a dark place."
Michele Roberts talked me out of figurative crime Tuesday. Every time I’ve watched “Do The Right Thing,” even as I understood why Mookie threw the trash can, I still thought he was wrong to do it. But I’d never wanted to throw the can myself. Now, I do. Good thing there was an adult on the phone. “You can end up feeling so helpless,” Roberts said from Orlando Tuesday, as she tried to convince the players who’ve empowered her as Executive Director of their union not to boycott playoff games this week, their anger at the latest shooting of a Black man by police officers – Jacob Blake, in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the shooting happening in front of his three children – stirring them to do something, anything, to express their anger and frustration while stuck in the bubble.
Yet Ariza made the heart-wrenching decision to opt out of playing alongside his Portland teammates because he was presented with an opportunity to have 30 days of visitation with his oldest son Tajh, who he had not seen in nearly a year due to custody issues. Ariza has no second thoughts about his choice, but that doesn't mean life outside the bubble has been easy. He has heard the pundits lamenting his absence, as he is a big, strong veteran player who could have helped handle Lakers forward LeBron James. "Man, the word 'hard' doesn't even begin to describe it," Ariza told ESPN. "This is what I was born to do, to play basketball. I've been doing it my whole life. And to know my team has a chance to compete for a championship, and I'm not with them. ... It burns me up inside."
"You know what? It's weird, but the opinions that mattered the most to me were all the opinions applauding me for my actions," Ariza said. "The Blazers couldn't have been more supportive. They understand how big this is, the times we are in, how important it is to teach a young Black boy to grow to be a successful Black man." During his month-long visit with Tajh, Ariza celebrated his son's charisma, his wise cracks, his dance moves and his strong opinions. He taught him to box in his home gym, shot baskets with him at sunset and spent a lot of time listening and learning.
Marc J. Spears: Today, selected family members and guests of NBA players can quarantine for seven days off-site in hopes of joining the "bubble" in playoffs second round. But if their NBA team is eliminated, which could happen to Indiana today, their loved ones will have to depart shortly after. There are also other selected NBA player family members and guests quarantining for three days in the team's market before taking a franchise charter flight to Orlando and then quarantining four more days on the Disney campus. But if team eliminated, you don't have to go home...
That lack of ambient sound in the three arenas being used at ESPN's Wide World of Sports Complex in Florida has made for a different dynamic between referees and the players and coaches throughout a game. "In my career, 10 years, I never would have heard an assistant from 70 feet away say, 'Make the f---ing call!'" referee Josh Tiven said. "But you might hear that here."
In the bubble, referees have had to rethink some of their approaches to the job. What do you do when you hear a foul you didn't necessarily see? What is it like knowing that the viewing audience can hear your explanation of every call in real time? And how much slack do you give during those on-court confrontations that are suddenly under a larger microscope? "It's been an unusual experience, and nothing we could ever dream of," said 26-year referee James Capers, one of the league's most veteran officials. "It's so unusual of a circumstance that I'm trying to take it one day at a time and just make the best out of it."
While there may be the occasional moment when a referee will hear something that helps confirm whether a play was a foul, officials are mostly relying on the typical things. "I'm so locked in that [it doesn't impact me]," Capers said. "We have a principle to referee the defender. So when that reach happens, I know if it's hand and ball, and I know that it's wrist, and I know if he gets him. Because, people don't talk about it, but basketball is a contact sport. We're trying to figure out if it is marginal and incidental, versus illegal. So as long as I am locked in, and as long as I am doing my job and focused, I see it the same way."
To celebrate the NBA Finals, Disney and NBA came up with a substantial collection of merchandise. The following merchandise will be showing up on August 24 at Disney Springs at Walt Disney World Resort and on August 31 on shopDisney.com. This new NBA Experience collection will be incredibly unique to go along with this once in a lifetime season that brought together the NBA and Disney for the NBA Playoffs at Walt Disney World Resort. The collections will do this visually as well as they combine NBA with classic Disney Parks icons. There will also be some specific merchandise for specific NBA teams. There is a little bit of everything for Disney and NBA fans. This includes drink ware, basketballs, phone cases, spirits jerseys, shirts, magic bands, and so much more!
That lack of ambient sound in the three arenas being used at ESPN's Wide World of Sports Complex has made for a different dynamic between referees and the players and coaches throughout a game. "In my career, 10 years, I never would have heard an assistant from 70 feet away say, 'Make the f---ing call!'" referee Josh Tiven said. "But you might hear that here."
In the bubble, referees have had to rethink some of their approaches to the job. What do you do when you hear a foul you didn't necessarily see? What is it like knowing that the viewing audience can hear your explanation of every call in real time? And how much rope do you give during those on-court confrontations that are suddenly under a larger microscope? "It's been an unusual experience, and nothing we could ever dream of," said 26-year referee James Capers, one of the league's most veteran officials. "It's so unusual of a circumstance that I'm trying to take it one day at a time and just make the best out of it."
While there may be the occasional moment when a referee will hear something that helps confirm whether a play was a foul or not, officials are mostly relying on the typical things. "I'm so locked in that [it doesn't impact me]," Capers said. "We have a principle to referee the defender. So when that reach happens, I know if it's hand and ball, and I know that it's wrist, and I know if he gets him. "Because, people don't talk about it, but basketball is a contact sport. We're trying to figure out if it is marginal and incidental, versus illegal. So as long as I am locked in, and as long as I am doing my job and focused, I see it the same way."
Adrian Wojnarowski: Utah Jazz guard Mike Conley Jr., is clearing quarantine soon and will be in lineup for Game 3 against Denver today, sources tell ESPN. Conley returned to Orlando on Monday night after attending the birth of his son, Elijah.
Casey Holdahl: According to @CJ McCollum (via @Zach Lowe's podcast), the Blazers are being booted out of the Yacht Club and moving to the Grand Floridian. Sounds like staff are moving most of their personal effects during tonight's game vs. Lakers with the final move taking place Wednesday.
Ben Golliver: Announcement: My first book will be "Bubbleball," a chronicle of my time in the NBA bubble & the 2020 title chase. - Thanks Mom, @mattvita at @washingtonpost, Tim Wojcik at @LGRLiterary & @EditorStoltz at @ABRAMSbooks. - Coming May 2021. Pre-order: https://bit.ly/3haMXrT

https://twitter.com/BenGolliver/status/1295739677270474753
Andrew Greif: Clippers center Montrezl Harrell has cleared the NBA's 7-day quarantine process, source tells @latimessports, and he is with the team at shootaround this morning.
Mirjam Swanson: JMyke - "We're mad about the days he got" - regarding Trezz's extended seven-day quarantine, which is due to end tomorrow, in line with the Clips' playoffs opener vs. Dallas.

https://twitter.com/ryanwmcdonald/status/1295090082873896960
Inside the Nuggets’ team meal room in the Orlando bubble, team officials had banners made depicting all 17 players that have now made it safely to the NBA’s re-start. Outside of it, in a public space where opposing teams walk on their way to practice, the Nuggets projected a much different message. The team created two separate banners that illustrate the social justice messages the organization has been amplifying for more than a month. One celebrates former congressman John Lewis, the late civil rights icon who spent his life fighting for equal voting rights.
The other banner reads “Don’t shut up and dribble,” and features 11 black-and-white photos taken from protests that Nuggets players participated in. Veterans Gary Harris and Jerami Grant both contributed to the collection. “I think it speaks volumes when you walk by our food room and you don’t necessarily see world championship banners,” Malone said. “You see banners reflecting the current mood across our country, which is terrific.”
Jared Weiss: Brad Stevens asked how he is feeling in the bubble a month in and you can see a smile crack through his mask: "Thanks for asking! I don't get asked that very often." Goes on to talk about how difficult being away from the family is, but how important it is to him to be there.
Brandon Rahbar: Chris Paul: “Today is my daughter’s 8th birthday. It’s the first time I haven’t been with one of my kids on their birthday. All day I’ll be on the phone with my daughter. Sending videos, letting her know how special she is.” Chris got her roller-skates with her name on them.
Kevin Harlan and Reggie Miller, who were ubiquitous on TNT seeding games, were given the first round off so they wouldn’t need to spend two consecutive months in the bubble. They’ll be back for later rounds. We’ll miss Harlan’s exuberant call in the first round. Ian Eagle, who teamed with Stan Van Gundy on TNT seeding games, is unavailable to Turner during the first round because he’s also the TV voice of the Brooklyn Nets, who play Toronto in the first round.
Van Gundy - during the first round of postseason - instead will work with Spero Dedes, the steady CBS NFL/college basketball announcer who has done NBA games for Turner in past years. Chris Webber, left off TNT’s schedule for seeding games, has been summoned to the bubble to work first-round games with TNT staffer and Milwaukee Brewers TV voice Brian Anderson.
“You can’t replicate actual presence when you’re waking up and you’re in the living room or you’re in the kitchen or you’re outside playing with your kids or playing with your daughter, playing video games with your boys or working out with your boys,” Lakers star LeBron James said. “You can’t replicate that. I’m not there. Savannah [James’ wife] is a beast at what she does. That’s controlling the home and being that rock for our family. So I’m not worried about that. But you definitely, you have that miss factor when you miss your family, you miss your kids.”
“I just miss the noise,” Caldwell-Pope said before a game last week. “It was good just to get away from the noise, but then I’m kind of missing it. I didn’t think I would say I miss my kids making all type of noise.” Caldwell-Pope has three sons — Kenzo is 8, Kentavious Jr. is 3 and Kendrix is the baby at 1. During the hiatus, he would help Kenzo participate in remote schooling; help complete multiplication homework from the desk in the playroom.
Not every family will come. They’ll have to subject young children to quarantines. Once they’re out of quarantine, not many kid-friendly activities will be available. “I already know she’s gonna go crazy,” Lakers forward Markieff Morris said of his 3-year-old daughter. “She’ll do anything to see me, so it is what it is.”
Jimmy Butler came up with a not-so-Mickey Mouse idea that now has his room at Disney World the hub for French-press coffee. At $20 a pop. What seemed like a bit of playfulness during an ESPN interview turned into fact with the Miami Heat's All-Star forward, outed when teammate Meyers Leonard posted a photo from outside of Butler's door at the Gran Destino resort. With a one-price-fits-all retail concept, Butler's "Big Face Coffee" menu includes Latte, Americano, Mocha, Pour Over, Espresso, Macchiato, Cappuccino, Red Eye and Café Au Lait. Again, the pricing is basic: Small $20; Medium $20; Large $20. Also made clear on the signage are "Cash Only" and "No I.O.U.'s."
Butler's agent offered background on Twitter, with Bernie Lee posting, "I've been waiting for someone to out this. This is outside JB's door. He ordered the whiteboard on Amazon and made the sign." Butler said it all is part of his entrepreneurial spirit. "I'm working on my coffee skills," he told ESPN. "After my career, I'm opening my coffee shop. Right now, I'm charging 20 bucks a cup. So if you want some, come through." IMGhttps://twitter.com/IraHeatBeat/status/1294616875482189825
Enes Kanter: “He put the volleyballs in the middle and just said, ‘Go!' And everybody [runs]. The guy that's throwing on me was Tacko [Fall]. So he's running one side, I'm on the other side. I picked up the ball -- that was the first time I played dodgeball so I didn't know like the balls were that light. So I went out, threw the ball, and it went to the moon. I'm like, ‘Oh no, this is ugly.' And someone was filming it. So we actually beat the black team first, the white team beat the black team first and they were out. Then, the second game was white against green, and we played against Kemba [Walker], Jaylen Brown, Tremont [Waters] … Grant Williams. Same setup. White team one side, green team other side, coach said, ‘Go!' and we pick up all those dodgeballs, green team got none, and we literally just destroyed them."
Jeff Zillgitt: All-bubble first team: Damian Lillard, Devin Booker, Luka Doncic, James Harden, TJ Warren. Second team: Giannis Antetokounmpo, Kawhi Leonard, Kristaps Porzingis, Caris LeVert, Michael Porter Jr.
Shams Charania: NBA Bubble Awards for seeding games: MVP: Portland’s Damian Lillard Coach: Phoenix’s Monty Williams
Only 49% of MLB fans surveyed feel that the sport will complete its World Series, which is scheduled to wrap up in late October. A larger percentage of NBA fans -- 58% -- think the NBA will finish its season in the bubble at Walt Disney World Resort. That season is scheduled to wrap up no later than Oct. 13.
A majority of fans in both the NBA and Major League Baseball think the champion will be legitimate ... though not by a large majority. A total of 57% of NBA fans think the champ will be legitimate despite it being held at a neutral site.
Ryan Ward: Rajon Rondo is now officially in the NBA bubble. He’ll begin his quarantine ahead of the playoffs.
The bubble—sorry, the campus—is operational. Is it what you hoped it would be? Adam Silver: It’s better than what we had envisioned. Players have taken to it in a more spirited way than we thought they would. We knew that this would require enormous sacrifice on everyone’s part, but I think that what is hard to calibrate—and this maybe goes to my experience when I first came into the arena—is the human emotion that comes with being around other people. And I think everyone realized they missed it more than they even understood. There are players either whose teams are not participating, who were unable to engage this summer because of injuries or other issues, who, once they spoke to fellow NBA players, have asked to join the experience down in Orlando.
Anything you wish you could have done? Adam Silver: I’d say my biggest disappointment is that we couldn’t find a sensible way to bring 30 teams down there. We know everything here involves compromises, but I do feel bad there are eight teams that are not part of the experience.
When asked about the possibility of Goldstein attending playoff games at some point, an NBA executive said matters would have to drastically change. This is about more than just going to basketball games, and reclaiming the courtside seats he owns near the visiting bench for Clippers and Lakers games. It’s about more than a multi-millionaire jet-setter with nowhere to jet set. As with so many people, it is about a person unable to enjoy some of his most valued connections because of the coronavirus.
Inside the Grand Floridian hotel, out of the soupy Florida heat, a wave of relief washed over Michele Roberts. For months, Roberts, the Executive Director of the NBA’s players association, worked tirelessly with league officials to piece together its return. Medical protocols needed to be worked out. Then, the financials. Yet even when an agreement had been hammered out, Roberts worried: How would players respond to months of isolation? Not bad, it turns out. “In some ways I didn't think it would be as forgiving as it has been,” Roberts told SI in an extended interview. There were the expected complaints. Players didn’t enjoy the 48-hour hard quarantine they received upon arrival. “I think had it been longer than that,” Roberts said, “then it may have been more problematic.” Those buzzing Roberts tell her how much they miss friends, family. “The good news is that's pretty much 99% of what I hear in terms of complaints,” Roberts said. “And at the end of the day, the guys have said, ‘I got to go to work. I'm at work, I'm doing my job.’”
Roberts will admit: There were days she didn’t think the NBA would get here. On March 11, as the coronavirus pandemic raged across Europe and cases in the U.S. began to grow, Roberts met with Adam Silver. Roberts had watched the virus spread overseas. “Milan is one of my favorite cities,” Roberts said. “It was virtually shut down the first week in March. When Roberts met with Silver, the discussion was not if players would start testing positive, but how to respond when they do.
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
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