Livingston — whose title is director, players affairs…

Livingston — whose title is director, players affairs and engagement — will be the highest-ranking Black person in the Warriors’ front office since Mitch Richmond in 2008. Rod Higgins was general manager — and No. 2 in basketball operations under Chris Mullin — from 2004 to 2007, with Richmond as his assistant. When Higgins left to take Charlotte’s GM job in May 2007, Richmond was promoted to director of player personnel.

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Unselfishness has always been what set him apart. His core motivation, a drive heightened by the end of his NBA career, is to help people. Livingston believes that is best accomplished by action. Words have the most meaning when girded in care. “I want to serve people,” Livingston said in a recent phone interview. “I want to help others. That’s what I get the most joy out of. So whether it’s at the boys club, you know, Salvation Army — whatever it is, it is going to be in service of other people.”
This is the core of why Livingston has decided to join the Warriors’ front office. A year ago this month, he announced his retirement from the NBA after 14 seasons. He was waived by the Warriors in July 2019 and spent two months trying to find a new team and prolong his career. He would only play for the Warriors, Clippers or Kings, so he could be near his wife and daughters. Those teams all went in other directions last offseason. So Livingston conceded to the inevitable and retired, then retreated into solace. As the African proverb says, do something at its right time and peace will accompany it.
Warriors GM Bob Myers declined to talk about the team's future plans before this season is officially over, but there has been no indication from league sources that the Warriors are exploring ways to improve by tinkering with their current core of Curry, Thompson, forward Draymond Green and small forward Andrew Wiggins, acquired at the trade deadline from the Minnesota Timberwolves. That would be a change in philosophy for the franchise, which has shown a willingness to consider major changes during its run of success.
What all went into your decision to retire this offseason? Zaza Pachulia: This summer it was different than any previous time with so many free agents, with 40 percent of NBA players being free agents this year. There was a lot of movement, lot of players changing teams. Really, it was hard to keep up with what team what player was going to. And now, watching the games, it’s, “Oh, gosh, this guy is on a different team with different uniforms.” So, a lot of players were free agents, and the game changed, it became very young and a lot of teams want young. Obviously with the draft, you have a new 60 players coming in. To maintain a spot is pretty competitive.
Zaza Pachulia: To be honest, I was aiming for staying in basketball in a front office, but I didn’t know what team. The last couple of years, every summer, I’ve been going to different schools to get an education from the business side. This summer, actually, I went to the NBA office for a job shadow, went there for a couple days. Met with every single department I possibly could and got a lot of knowledge and experience in that regard. But I didn’t know the Warriors were gonna be the team who would offer me to join. I was really concentrated on playing every year, I was practicing and playing over the summer. It just … I dunno, it was great.
“This is a team that probably was headed toward the lottery anyway and now you look at the lineup they’re going to be putting out on that floor … This is a team that is going to be in the lottery, and probably deep in the lottery. Remember, they have a protected first-round pick going to Brooklyn in the sign-and-trade that brought them D’Angelo Russell, but that means they’ll keep that pick this year and they’ll have a chance to get back up really high in this draft and maybe get an impact player and then try to come back next year with Curry, Klay Thompson, certainly Draymond Green and that core. They’ll have the mid-level exception they can use in free agency.
The Golden State Warriors have promoted Jennifer Millet to Senior Vice President of Marketing and Mike Kitts to Senior Vice President of Partnerships, the team announced today. Both Millet and Kitts will continue to report to Warriors Chief Revenue Officer Brandon Schneider. In their elevated roles, Millet will continue to lead all marketing efforts and Kitts will oversee all corporate partnerships efforts for the Warriors and Chase Center. “Jen and Mike have both established themselves as fantastic senior leaders during one of the most pivotal times for our organization as we move from a basketball team to a sports and entertainment company,” said Warriors President and Chief Operating Officer Rick Welts. “From Jen creating, expanding and launching new marketing elements across the Warriors and Chase Center and Mike building the most robust and innovative partnership program, both have proven to be the best at what they do in their respective areas. Jen and Mike are perfect examples of what our organization represents.”
Dunleavy is now an assistant general manager toward the top of a Warriors front office that lost Jerry West and Travis Schlenk, two forceful voices, the last three years. West is now an executive board member with the Clippers and Schlenk is the GM of the Atlanta Hawks. Dunleavy moves to the Bay Area in a few weeks, a ghost of Warriors’ past stepping into an increased role reshaping the franchise’s future.
Dunleavy lived closer to Barclays Center than Madison Square Garden. So he was in Brooklyn a bunch, allowing him to closely observe Russell’s transformation from presumed bust to fringe All-Star. “I didn’t see D’Angelo Russell play live 10, 20 times (like Mike),” Myers said. “There’s never been more information available, whether it’s analytics, your ability to watch tape, see games, dig into numbers. But I don’t think any of it is a substitute for actually going to a game in person, talking to coaches and watching the whole day develop, from when the player gets there to warm up, the stuff fans don’t see, interacting on a closer level, how they act when they get subbed out, how they react to winning and losing.”
The Hall of Famer was a guest on The Dan Patrick Show on Monday, and made some interesting comments: "One of the things I enjoy about being here -- and obviously this is gonna be my final stop in my basketball life -- is [Clippers owner] Steve Ballmer has really put together an unbelievably terrific organization. He has spared no expense. "It's a really fun place to be. It's not ego-driven at all. He's got an awful lot of basketball people over there and I'm just happy to be such a small part of it. "He's willing to spend on players, he's willing to spend on personnel within the front office. I've never been around any organization that's better than this one that's for sure."
Can the Warriors, as they leave Oracle behind after 47 years, stay at a level commensurate with dynastic ticket prices? “We’re planning on owning this team for a long time, so I might have a little longer-term view than that to be honest,” said Lacob, who shares primary ownership with Peter Guber. “I think you can rest assured we’ll figure out a way to be very competitive going forward.”
Jerry​ West helped​ build​ the​ Warriors​ dynasty beside Joe Lacob, Bob Myers,​ Steve Kerr​ and​ the rest,​ of​ course,​​ and right now he’s in his second season of trying to do something very similar with the Clippers beside owner Steve Ballmer, president Lawrence Frank and coach Doc Rivers. So I asked the NBA legend on Tuesday: Has it been a little strange for you to watch your Clippers play the Warriors — and fall to a 3-1 deficit — in this first-round series so soon after you celebrated multiple titles in the Bay Area? “I don’t look at it that way — to me, this is all about competition,” West said by phone. “It’s fun. At the end of the day, you just want to win.”
As The Times reported last July, Philadelphia made an ambitious attempt at trying to hire Daryl Morey away from Houston — and I’m told Philly also commissioned a clandestine run at prying Myers away from the Warriors that was likewise rebuffed.
Me: What are you doing here today? Bob: What do you mean? Me: Shouldn’t you be having lunch with (Lakers controlling owner) Jeanie Buss? Bob: Oh, right. Almost forgot. (Looks at his watch) I’m supposed to meet her at 2. Myers then laughed a laugh that suggests he’s not eager to go anywhere anytime soon, even if there are days and nights when he probably wouldn’t mind.
If there is one team that could make Myers consider leaving the Warriors dynasty, it would be the Lakers. He’s of Danville origins, but Myers is definitely Los Angeles verified. He went to UCLA, where he played basketball and helped with the school’s long search for a new men’s basketball coach, which ended with Mick Cronin’s introduction on Tuesday with Myers in attendance. He got his law degree in Los Angeles while working his way up the ranks of Los Angeles-based Wasserman Media Group. He has a good relationship with Kobe Bryant, the Mr. Laker of this era, whom Myers worked with during his agent days.
But why would Myers want to go to the Lakers? Well, for starters, money. According to Sam Amick, national NBA writer for The Athletic — as he discussed on the new “Tampering” podcast — Magic was making $10 million a year with the Lakers. No, Myers does not make that much with the Warriors. Maybe about half that. Myers definitely makes less than Warriors coach Steve Kerr, who recently signed a contract extension at a number the Warriors have been diligent about keeping close to the vest.
Nick Friedell: Myers still doesn’t want to put a return date on when DeMarcus Cousins will be back but he likes the progress Cousins continues to make in rehab. “I think we’re nearing the finish line,” Myers said. Warriors still have extra roster spot to add center via trade or buyout market.
Logan Murdock: Kevin Durant on Warriors’ GM Bob Myers getting early gems like Alfonzo McKinnie and Jonas Jerebko on minimum deals last summer: “He did what he’s supposed to do. That’s his job.”
The back-to-back NBA Champion Golden State Warriors have promoted John Beaven to Senior Vice President of Ticket Sales and Services and Raymond Ridder to Senior Vice President of Communications, the team announced today. Beaven will continue to report to Warriors Chief Revenue Officer Brandon Schneider, with Ridder continuing to report to Warriors President and Chief Operating Officer Rick Welts and Warriors President of Basketball Operations/General Manager Bob Myers.
As the Warriors enter the 2018-19 season, Kevin Durant’s pending free agency next season serves as the most vivid example. Will he re-sign with the Warriors as he has done every summer for the past two years? Or will he decide he is better off pursuing NBA championships, scoring records and business deals elsewhere? “For some reason, everyone thinks this year is different than last,” Warriors majority owner Joe Lacob told Bay Area News Group. “I don’t see that.”
The source of the hullabaloo stems from Durant’s obvious star power and uncertainty on what variables he will measure with his next contract. Will he value the Warriors’ championship equity, team-oriented culture and monetary advantage? Or does Durant want to prove he can win elsewhere without the Warriors’ three other All-Stars in Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green? “He loves being a part of our organization and being a part of the Bay Area,” Lacob said of Durant. “He’s earned the right to be a free agent or do whatever he wants in terms of contract status. I would let it play out and see what happens. I’m not too worried about it.”
Yet, the Warriors hardly seem satisfied. Durant and Thompson will become unrestricted free agents next summer. Green will be an unrestricted free agent in 2020. And as much as the Warriors expressed confidence they can retain all of their All-Stars, they also have contingency plans. To help with that process, the Warriors hired a former player and father of a former longtime NBA coach and executive (Mike Dunleavy Sr.). “That’s going to be really helpful for us,” Kerr said of Dunleavy’s presence. “He’s also a great guy and cool person, fun to be around and good to have in your building.”
In his new role, Dunleavy, 38, will help oversee the Warriors’ pro scouting on the East Coast. His focus will be on compiling reports of players whom Golden State might target in free agency or via trade. Dunleavy, who lives in New York City, also will help scout college players when necessary. It is the first stop in what he hopes is a new career in an NBA front office. Warriors general manager Bob Myers, who spent nine years as Dunleavy’s agent before taking a job as Golden State’s assistant general manager, offered him the position in hopes of strengthening the team’s pro-scouting department.
This illustrates another layer of complication in a team sale process: Is it the commissioner or the seller who holds the cards? Some knowing parties have speculated that Ellison miscalculated and fostered more of a connection with Stern than with Cohan. While, say, Clay Bennett might have benefited from a tight relationship with Stern in his pursuit of the then-Sonics (now the Oklahoma City Thunder), every one of these situations is different. Stern, though famously powerful, saw himself as more of a facilitator in this and other proceedings. “I knew that Sal was representing the product, and I knew Joe, and I knew Larry (Ellison) and so I was in touch with them,” Stern said in a phone interview. “I don’t wanna get any further than that.” Stern added his assessment: “Larry could’ve made the purchase, but he didn’t. He skipped a beat and Joe moves right in and took the team away from him.”
Lacob had laid the groundwork with Cohan, though, having met with the notoriously shy absentee owner at AT&T Park years earlier. At the time, Cohan wasn’t selling, but Lacob wanted to make an impression. “So he liked me maybe,” says Lacob, who then muses, “I think that was part of it was that he really didn’t want Larry to get the team, perhaps.” Then Lacob picks up the sale story. “‘OK, what’s the price?’ I asked. He said, ‘$440 million and there will be no deductions for anything you find during the due-diligence process. That’s the price, flat out, has to be it. Second, $20 million, non-refundable under any circumstances.’ Now, that is a risk.” “And so I gave him an answer, instantaneously, and I don’t know where it came from, but it just came out of me: ‘I won’t do that.’ And he said, ‘OK.’ And I heard a silence at the other end of the line.”
Lacob just had one other big, unusual demand: He needed a signed purchase agreement within 72 hours. Such arrangements usually take months, but Lacob pressed on. There was too great a fear of Ellison catching wind and blowing the offer out of the water. Sure, Cohan could orally agree to this deal, but what if Ellison pulled an extra hundred million out of his couch cushions? Could Cohan be trusted not to buckle?
“We worked straight, 72 hours,” Lacob recalls. “I said to our lawyer, ‘You do not go to sleep until this thing is done. ‘Cause this is the key, we have to get this closed, we can’t have a non-binding agreement ’cause we’ll get re-shopped.’” Three sleepless nights later, the Warriors were secured, taken right from under Ellison’s nose. Guber celebrated at his Los Angeles area home, while holding the “Ellison reportedly close to buying Warriors,” story up in the air. Lacob exalted in a helicopter flying over the Oracle at Delphi. He even allows some reminiscing for this one. “We took off up there and took our vacation days,” Lacob says. “That was a pretty big moment that you like to remember. And pretty fun when you think about it. That was a big moment.” That moment was the start of a currently dominant dynasty.
I’ll point out that Bob Myers was always going to spend at most a year as an assistant general manager behind Larry Riley, and it turned out it was about 11 months before he was promoted to GM. In truth, Myers assumed GM powers almost from the moment he arrived, though I realize some people don’t report it that way. But what was the one moment I saw the possibility that Lacob and Guber could create something great? I’ll say all the events before and after the Monta Ellis-Andrew Bogut trade — the detailed basketball acumen (West and Myers arguing that Curry and Klay needed to be the backcourt, free of Ellis), the deal-making (Myers working the phones), the patience (Bogut was hurt and wouldn’t be available for months), the abandoning of the loopy “Great Time Out” mindset (defense matters), and then the angriest episode.
Question: So you just got a call that morning (you signed Cousins) — can you take us through how it went down? Bob Myers: We talked, I talked to his agent Jerry (Akana) in the morning, and he said: “What are you guys trying to do?” And I said: “What are you trying to do?” From there, I was honest, I said there’s not a lot we can do. Then hearing from there they were open to (taking the mid-level exception), that was the first moment where it looked like there was a possibility it would happen. Then I talked to DeMarcus pretty early that morning. That was really just the beginning of it, just (wondering) if it was something he’d really consider. Hearing his voice, hearing his conviction, it made it real to me.
“I was f—ed up,” Cousins said. “I said to Jarinn, ‘Let’s make a call.’ He was shocked. It was very insulting to not receive an offer. But I understand. I prepared myself for this.” So around 8 a.m., Cousins said he called Warriors general manager Bob Myers. This is not a misprint. Myers cannot talk about free agents until they can sign with teams on Friday. But when Myers can speak, boy does he have a story to tell. Imagine Myers picking up his cellphone and a man with a deep voice says, “Hey, this is DeMarcus Cousins … got a minute?”
Mark Medina: Unsurprisingly, Bob Myers said he plans to huddle up this week with rest of front office and Steve Kerr on what they’re thinking on free agency decisions. Myers said team wanted to hold off on discussions until after the draft and so everyone could recharge during the weekend
No matter whom they pick at No. 28, the Warriors will again look to purchase a second-round pick in this year’s draft, a source told Sporting News. Golden State bought a pick from Chicago last year, and used it to select Bell. “If anyone sells them a pick,” one GM joked, “they ought to have their head checked. Once that first round is over, everyone needs to just not pick up the phone if [Warriors GM Bob] Myers is calling.”
Warriors general manager Bob Myers expects swift negotiations to re-sign two-time reigning NBA Finals MVP Kevin Durant and coach Steve Kerr. Durant could sign for as long as four years and about $160 million, and Myers is prepared to give him “whatever he wants.” Durant has said all along he wants to stay put, especially after winning a pair of championships in his first two seasons with Golden State.
Bryant was a guest onThe HoopsHype Podcast with Alex Kennedy on Monday and playfully discussed the idea of playing with the Warriors as he recalled an offer from Warriors general manager Bob Myers to forgo retirement and join the team. “Not seriously,” Bryant said while laughing. “I’ve known Bob Myers, the (general manager) over at Golden State, forever… My last all star game we had a chance to catch up, as we were staying at the same hotel. I got a chance to tell him congratulations on everything and he said ‘Hey listen, if there’s any chance you want to change your mind and play another year, you can always come here.’ But it’s all tongue in cheek man.”
Mark Medina: Bob Myers on Kevin Durant:’s free agency: “Whatever he wants. There’s no negotiation.”
Melissa Rohlin: Bob Myers on KD saying he’s coming back: “Maybe I’m naïve but I never felt like he was leaving.”

http://twitter.com/MarkG_Medina/status/1006289465881518080
After a lethargic loss in Indiana in April, Kerr publicly wondered if his team needed to care more. That didn't go over well with the players, and Kerr subsequently walked the statement back. Kerr and general manager Bob Myers met privately after that loss in Indiana to discuss what could be done to rouse the team from its late-season slumber. "I told Steve, because he was upset after Indiana, 'We have to give them the benefit of the doubt. They've earned that,'" Myers said. "Was I worried? My first thought was, 'Yes.' But my second thought was, 'Have they let us down yet?'"
Three weeks later, the Warriors added their third championship in four years to the trophy case. They celebrated in the same building and at the same restaurant -- Morton's The Steakhouse in Cleveland -- as they did for the first championship in 2015. So much had changed since that first year. For the Warriors and for the league. And yet there was a sweetness in the symmetry. "It's like your first kid; there's nothing like it," Myers said in comparing championship runs. "And then you try to get more."
Warriors owner/CEO Joe Lacob dropped by the ESPN2 set live from the NBA Draft combine at the Barclays Center in New York on Friday to talk all things draft. Lacob said this was the second time he’s been at the combine, which precedes the June 21 draft. The event primarily features second-tier prospects, which works out well for Lacob and the Warriors who sit No. 28 in the draft. “For us, it’s (players drafted) 20 to 40 or 20 to 50. Those are the players that are here to some extend,” Lacob explained. “And that’s where we are — 28. Maybe we’ll buy a second-round pick again. I’m very aggressive with respective to those, as you know.”
The Warriors have been in discussions with point guard Quinn Cook about a multiyear deal that would turn his two-way contract into a standard NBA deal, a team source has confirmed with The Chronicle. [...] "Quinn is a guy Steve (Kerr) has leaned on and the players have come to trust," general manager Bob Myers told 95.7 The Game on Wednesday afternoon. "It’s conversations we’ve had. We’ll have to come to some type of decision prior to the last game of the season."
Rick Welts with a news drop on our show today: The Golden State Warriors will keep the name Golden State Warriors when they move to San Francisco. "Let's make it official," Welts said.
Logan Murdock: Warriors owner Joe Lacob to @957thegame on Quinn Cook making the playoff roster: “We’re going to make that decision right at the end because a lot of things can happen."
The NBA champion Golden State Warriors are losing one of their top executives. Chief Marketing Officer Chip Bowers is joining baseball’s Miami Marlins as president of business operations, reporting to part-owner and Chief Executive Officer Derek Jeter, according to people familiar with the personnel move. The people requested anonymity because the move hasn’t been announced. It is Jeter’s second executive hire since taking the reins in September. Earlier this year he also added David Oxfeld from Jeter’s longtime agency, Excel Sports Management, where he worked on client sales and business development.
Ballmer, to review, spent last summer making drastic changes to the way in which roster decisions are made while sparing no expense. The 61-year-old, who stands at No. 15 on Forbes’ latest list of wealthiest Americans, lured Jerry West away from the Golden State Warriors as a consultant in mid-July, paying him between $4 million and $5 million annually to be a trusted and unfiltered voice on all personnel matters.
Steve Kerr and Warriors management held preliminary contract extension talks last summer, but Kerr tabled final discussions until next summer to make sure he felt healthy enough to make a long-term commitment, Kerr told The Athletic on Sunday evening. Kerr and general manager Bob Myers held the initial talks — and Kerr, Myers and Warriors owner Joe Lacob all told The Athletic on Sunday that they fully expect that Kerr will sign an extension next summer.
“We just agreed we'd wait,” Kerr said. “I've got two years left on my deal and wanted to make sure that everything went well this year health-wise. And I don't anticipate any issues going forward. “I don't have any desire to be anywhere else. So I'm sure when we get down to it, we'll come to an agreement pretty quickly.”
Warriors general manager Bob Myers said that injury scare is often forgotten in talk about Durant’s road to his first championship. He added that he was glad Durant not only got the ring but also lost the pressure of not having one. “I’m glad he’s getting a ring,” Myers said before the game. “He earned it. It would have been sad if he had not gotten one and didn’t check that box. He’s too good of a player. Sometimes great players never get that opportunity. Players in this day and age, I feel like there is such pressure that it has to happen for them. Sometimes it’s not their fault. But to see him obtain that pretty early, I think he has a lot of years left. I’m really happy for him.”
On top of that, as the Warriors prepared for the postseason, Warriors owner Joe Lacob was considering offering Curry a contract below the max, even though Curry has been one of the most underpaid players in all of sports over the last three seasons. Warriors general manager Bob Myers kept Lacob from bringing a reduced offer to the negotiating table, but it was enough of a thing that Myers reassured Curry of the franchise’s commitment. Curry wound up getting the largest contract in NBA history: five years, $201 million.
Mark Medina: Bob Myers said Larry Harris and Nick U'Ren will have elevated roles with Jerry West going to Clippers & Travis Schlenk going to Hawks
“When I took the job, my wife asked me ‘will there be any media?’” Myers said. “I said ‘it’s the Warriors — nobody cares.” “Am I getting more comfortable with [the attention]? Probably not… I don’t really know what to make of that. Anonymity is a good thing.”
Bob Myers: You remember when there were rumblings that he didn’t want to be a Warrior. You remember him potentially not showing up for a press conference. So Steph Curry, he is who he is so he shows up. His first few years were not a good initial experience. As far as I know, I never heard him saying, “Get me out of here.” My point is this, when he got to our organization we were not a team or destination that the most ardent Warrior would say was capable of winning a championship; the playoffs were our championship.
Bob Myers: People always ask me what we said to Kevin (Durant) in the Hamptons. It wasn’t what anyone said in that four-hour period. It was Steph Curry building a foundation, being selfless enough to go. It was Andre Iguodala, who knew we were going after a guy who played his position. It was Draymond Green, it was Steve Kerr, it was all the things that those guys had done that put us in a position to be in a place where Kevin Durant said, “I wanna meet with that team.” There’s no magic words in life.
On Monday, the former Lakers legend and Hall of Famer talked about his move south an interview with The Athletic's Tim Kawakami. "Frankly it was very sad, OK? It really was. A place where I thought that if I was going to work another year or if somebody wanted me to work another year, I thought I could contribute; I did not want to leave. I did not want to leave. I was very happy there. But those things happen sometimes. Obviously to be around a bunch of players that were as together as any I’ve seen and I think more importantly the talent that was on that team and to see the joy. There’s a lot of joy there. I think those are the kind of environments where people really prosper."
West then explains why he's not with the Warriors anymore. "It was time for me to leave. I’m in Los Angeles again. For me, I’ll have a chance to go in the office a little bit and watch some of the people that have been hired, to watch our coaches coach. I’ve often said I’ve done some crazy things in my life because of the timing and maybe the timing was right."
No coach ever stops coaching, even in the offseason. Kerr says he spends at minimum a couple of hours a day on Warriors business. “I’m on the phone, talking to (general manager) Bob Myers, talking to our coaches and to different people. Writing down thoughts, putting together plans for our coaching retreat (before training camp). It might be just something that pops into my head, where I just stop and write something down. But I’m not Jon Gruden (famous workaholic), I’m not waking up at five in the morning and going to the film room (laugh).”
An official announcement is not expected until next week, another executive said, possibly as early as Monday. “Obviously, it’s attractive to him because he lives in the Los Angeles area and started his career as a player in L.A. with the Lakers,” one executive said. “This is the place for him to go because he’s looking for things to do still. He’s looking for another challenge.” Even after West met with Clippers owner Steve Ballmer and Doc Rivers, the team’s coach and president of basketball operations, on May 30 at the team’s practice facility in Playa Vista, the executives said West “twice changed his mind” before deciding Wednesday that he wanted to join the Clippers.
"(Myers) doesn't get the credit he deserves," Green said. "That's been on my mind a lot for a long time. At the end of the day, you look at the work that he's done with this team, this team had never won before he got here (in April 2011), and he has put together a great team that's put together two championships in three years. It's about God damn time he got some credit for it."
After six years as a special consultant, Jerry West is leaving the Golden State Warriors to take a similar job with the Los Angeles Clippers, SI.com has learned. West, who turned 79 as the NBA Finals began, made his decision over the last couple of weeks.

http://twitter.com/Con_Chron/status/875207937748119552
But recently, West himself told friends that he wondered whether Myers really needed his input much any more — that Myers had grown so much in the position, West’s voice maybe would be more valuable somewhere else. West pushed for Myers to get the promotion to team president and a large raise last summer, but pointedly West did not get an extension at the same time — their previous extensions had been relatively simultaneous.
Storyline: Warriors Front Office
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October 22, 2020 | 11:09 pm EDT Update
Lowe had this to say on his podcast: “Enough people have asked me what I’ve heard about Blake Griffin and how he’s looking, that I think Detroit is gonna have a market for him. I don’t think it’s gonna be strong, but I think there is still interest in what he can do to help you win.” I also have heard a little noise about Griffin’s health and availability. Now, I don’t get the sense the Pistons are eager to trade him just to trade him. From all accounts, the knee injury that forced him to miss most of last season has healed and he’s feeling fine. The last time we saw Griffin with two working knees, he was All-NBA and one of the league’s 20 best players. The Pistons don’t want to be a doormat, and they appear to be confident he still has good basketball left in him, with only two years left on his deal.
Storyline: Blake Griffin Trade?
Everyone on the roster is scattered across the country, so is there someone that you’ve stayed in closest contact with during this offseason? Andre Drummond: “Yeah. Definitely Darius Garland for sure is someone I have spent a lot of time with over these months. Larry, Kevin and I’ve seen Collin a few times. Kevin Porter has come down to work with me. Earlier in like June, he came and stayed with me for a week to work out. Other than that, I’ve talked to everyone fairly often. We’re all on a group chat and we all check in on each other.” Well, you brought it up, saying you want to help Porter take his game to the next level. That would require you being with the Cavs. Does that mean you’ve made the decision to pick up your option already? Andre Drummond: “As of right now I’m just focusing on what I can worry about. Working on my game. Right now, just worrying about what’s happening with the next couple of months, before the season. Whenever it’s time to start, and when that time does come to make that decision, everybody will know. Right now, I’m a Cleveland Cavalier. In terms of extending, we will find that out when the time comes around.”
And despite saying back in June that he planned to stay in Cleveland, Drummond is now hedging. “I’m at a point now in my career where I spent the last eight years in Detroit, and I’m looking forward to the new start. If it’s with the Cavs, fantastic,” Drummond told Cleveland.com. “If” is a strong word in this instance, and a well-informed league source told BasketballNews.com that Drummond is genuinely undecided about exercising his player option.
What’s encouraging about the last part of Pierce’s quote is Collins has put in the work. He has worked with assistant coach Chris Jent this offseason so extensively that the Hawks had to force Collins to take days off before their minicamp began a few weeks ago. According to several sources who have been inside the facility this offseason, Collins has been a clear standout with his work ethic and level of play in the minicamp. Because Collins has grown in every area the Hawks have wanted him to grow in so far, such as 3-point shooting and rim protection, there’s reason to believe he can work to become a better playmaker, too.
The NBA spent $180 million to operate 100 days of basketball in its Disney bubble, but the steep investment allowed the league to stop the loss of $1.5 billion in projected revenue. According to sources familiar with the league’s finances, the Disney restart allowed the NBA to stem the loss of about $1.5 billion in expected revenue, the bulk of the money tied to national and local television revenue followed by league sponsorships.
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
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