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More on Malik Beasley Arrest

Minnesota Timberwolves guard Malik Beasley has been arrested on charges of marijuana possession and receiving and concealing stolen property, The Athletic has learned. Police arrived at Beasley’s home in Plymouth, Minnesota, on Saturday night and took the 23-year-old into custody. Beasley was being held without bail at Hennepin County Jail until he sees a judge, which could be another 24 hours, sources said.
“We are aware of the situation involving Malik Beasley and are in the process of gathering information at this time,” the Timberwolves said in a statement issued Sunday morning. Steve Haney, Beasley’s attorney released the following statement to The Athletic: “At the time of the incident, multiple individuals were present at the residence. The allegations against Malik will be defended vigorously.”
According to a source, police have received multiple trespassing complaints on Beasley’s home in the past. The Timberwolves are holding a three-week, voluntary camp at their practice facility in Minneapolis, which was granted by the NBA to the eight teams that did not qualify for the Orlando bubble. Beasley participated in individual workouts in the first week of the camp, but was not with the team last week when they opened five-on-five, group workouts.
Storyline: Malik Beasley Arrest
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November 25, 2020 | 5:11 pm EST Update
I wanted to chat with you a little bit about your involvement with the NBA Foundation, which seeks to drive economic empowerment for Black communities through employment and career advancement. What is your role there and how did you get involved? Harrison Barnes: NBPA director Michele Roberts reached out and asked if I had an interest in being a part of the foundation. I had seen information before about how big the funding for the foundation was going to be and what some of the principles were early on and so I knew what it was about. The main premise is that every year, each time will make significant contributions to the community. This will help with opportunities beyond simply just doing an event, whether that is helping kids go to college or giving them career skills. I was honored to be considered and I told her I would be ecstatic to do it. Now, I am really looking forward to working with the board members to hopefully make a change.
There are hundreds of players in the NBA. But you and Tobias Harris are the only two that are active on an NBA roster and will sit on this board. Why do you think the NBPA decided on you for that honor? Harrison Barnes: That’s probably a question you’ll probably have to ask as opposed to me! [Laughs] Since I got drafted, literacy has been a big focus of mine. You need to educate yourself in whatever discipline you want to go into. Recently, I joined the board of First National Bank, whose parent company is Ames National Corporation. I’m going to work with them to promote financial literacy. For the NBA Foundation, the opportunity to promote financial literacy and help the community is very exciting for me. No matter where I’ve gone, I’ve always tried to pay it forward. I’ve been blessed to have people pour into me and sacrifice and invest in my well-being so I’m glad to be a part of a foundation with a very big reach that will hopefully affect change for a number of different people.
You were friends with Kobe Bryant. You had COVID-19. You engaged with the protests for social justice. You played in the NBA bubble. What are you most going to remember from this year? Harrison Barnes: The biggest takeaway that I’ll have from 2020 is to appreciate people when you’re around them. In so many instances, we’ve seen loved ones that we’ve lost, whether it’s been someone at the hands of police brutality or people that you played against or were mentored or if it was a loved one lost because of COVID. Whatever the case may be, really just taking the time to just appreciate them while they’re here. Give them their flowers. Give them their respect and love and communicate that. Far too often, we found ourselves in the cycle of thinking that this person was gone too soon, and it was unexpected, and there are so many things I wish I had said. When Kobe passed, it was like the floor gave out. It’s still painful, especially in the basketball community. But outside of that, you really value the opportunity every time you step on the floor against somebody else. You don’t take that opportunity for granted. I’m playing against someone and it could be the last time. You never know. Life can go so quickly. I’m just savoring the opportunity, communicating with guys, communicating with family. Life is short. You don’t know what’s next.
November 25, 2020 | 5:05 pm EST Update

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