Australian basketball great Andrew Bogut has retired fr…

Australian basketball great Andrew Bogut has retired from the sport effective immediately, leaving the nation without its most experienced campaigner ahead of next year’s Tokyo Olympics. Bogut, who won an NBA championship with Golden State in 2015, announced his decision on his podcast Rogues Bogues on Tuesday, citing a growing toll of injuries on his body. “The decision hasn’t been an easy one, but I think it is the right decision. The decision that I made and where I will be signing for next season is absolutely nowhere. I will be retiring from professional basketball, effective immediately,” Bogut said.

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After 15 years in professional basketball, Andrew Bogut is close to making a decision on when to end his career. The coronavirus and subsequent postponement of the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo isn't making it any easier. The 35-year-old Bogut, who was the 2005 No. 1 draft pick by the Milwaukee Bucks and later won an NBA championship with the Golden State Warriors in 2015, was planning to retire after playing for Australia at the Tokyo Games in three months. Those games have been delayed until July 2021. But Bogut, who has played for Sydney in the National Basketball League the past two seasons, isn't sure he can take the training and discipline needed to go another year.
"I'm not doing much, I can tell you that,'' Bogut told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation "Offsiders" program, which aired on Sunday. "To be able to kiss your kids goodnight and put them down every night ... I've appreciated doing that.'' Bogut has two boys -- Luka, 3, and Nikola, 2 -- with his wife, Jessica. "I haven't done any basketball since the season ended, and it feels good waking up, getting out of bed and not feeling like I'm walking on glass,'' Bogut said. "It's [my career] all been thrown into a washing machine, essentially ... but there's a decision to be made probably by mid-May.''
Bogut expressed interest in coaching once his kids complete high school in over a decade from now. But Loeliger sounded open minded on whether Bogut would eventually become an executive or coach with the Kings. “More likely than not, he’s going to be involved in the front office with the Sydney Kings,” Loeliger said. “But I’d certainly be open to both possibilities. He’s definitely an asset.”
Olgun Uluc: Andrew Bogut says there are no NBA outs in his deal. No Euro outs, either. He’s committed to the Sydney Kings for two years, and says he’s retired from the NBA.
Andrew Bogut: I’ll definitely coach at some point, but I don’t think it will be in the NBA. I don’t think the NBA lifestyle is conducive to raise a family in. I think the environment is great as a player, you make the most of it but to continue and be involved in the NBA for 30-40 years, I don’t think I can do it.
Do you see yourself coaching back here in Australia at the club or National Team level? Andrew Bogut: Who knows, I couldn’t tell you right now honestly. The NBL could be a possibility, National Team – the local junior competition. I’ll be in a position where I don’t have to do anything for money, so I can kind of do what I enjoy doing most.
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While the Nets starters tired and Harden, Irving and Durant played the final 18:45 together, Brooklyn’s best on-ball defender, Bruce Brown, sat on the bench. Brown’s 6-2 frame made for an ideal matchup to potentially cool down Sexton, who is 6-1, but after seeing the reserves struggle in the second quarter, Nash elected to tighten his rotations and play just nine all game. After the game, Brooklyn’s stars said Sexton hit a lot of difficult shots on them and his performance isn’t a total reflection of the defense. “He made some tough shots,” Harden said. “And if he missed those shots, is it good defense? No, he made some tough shots, everybody’s tired at that point, and I think we did enough, especially in the fourth quarter and first overtime. I don’t know how many points he had in that second overtime, but I think he had the majority of them. Chalk your hat up to him.”
Irving said his time in Cleveland with LeBron James and Kevin Love taught him that resolve, compromise and sacrifice was necessary for the Cavaliers to win at a high level. Irving thinks the same can happen in Brooklyn with his new star-studded team. Like his last one, it isn’t going to happen immediately. “We’ll have good nights, we’ll have great nights, but it’s how we galvanize as a group together,” Irving said. “It’s how we sacrifice and compromise for the greater good. And that still remains to be seen. Obviously, one game is out of the way, but I’m excited for what’s to come.”
His teammates have noticed a difference in him, too. Osman has noted the advancements in Sexton’s game from his rookie year to now. Sexton is competitive on the defensive end of the floor, he’s making the extra pass and his assists this season are up to 3.7 per game. “Obviously, last year he was better, and this year he’s even better,” Osman said. “He made like 14 or 15 points in a row, and then there was good defense on him, but then he found TP (new Cavalier Taurean Prince) in the corner for a 3-point shot that was wide open. That was a beautiful play from Collin. He could have taken that one too but saw TP was open, and that was the right play, so he made the right play. You can see from his first year until now — he’s just getting better every day.”
Meanwhile, Kerr says the Warriors focused the “vast majority” of their initial practices this preseason on defense so they can compete in early games while beta testing the offense on the fly. “Training camp before was just about getting in shape,” Curry says. “Now we gotta do that and figure out who needs to be where, what sets are going to be our bread and butter, defensive chemistry and communication — everything that makes a team great.”
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