Aaron J. Fentress: "I just really feel bad for Zach." -…

Aaron J. Fentress: “I just really feel bad for Zach.” – Blazers coach Terry Stotts Portland Trail Blazers’ Zach Collins undergoes second ankle surgery, out indefinitely @Ripcity oregonlive.com/blazers/2020/1…

More on Zach Collins Injury

According to reports, Collins fractured his medial malleolus, which is the inside of his shin bone (i.e., tibia) at his ankle. When looking at your own ankle, it’s that rounded bony protrusion that sticks out a little bit above your shoe. The bad news for Collins & the Trail Blazers is that the tibia is a weight bearing bone, which means getting clearance to play may take a lot longer than if it were a non-wearing bone.
Unfortunately, stress fractures are one of the more serious sports injuries as they often involve prolonged return times and high risk of re-injury. They occur at a rate of 20% in high-level athletes with about 90% occurring in the lower limb. How bad the stress fracture is depends on where it is and type, with Collins’ injury being one of the less common locations. Regardless, stress fractures are categorized as “high risk” or “low risk” based on how they heal.
“High risk” stress fractures can be much more problematic compared to “low risk”, as the break can get longer and/or take longer to heal. “Low risk” stress fractures are almost always managed successfully using conservative treatment (i.e., physical therapy and no surgery), while those that are “high risk” are more difficult to diagnose and may require surgery. Thus, it’s fairly obvious that Collins’ stress fracture may be categorized as “high risk” given the Trail Blazers’ announcement that he will undergo season-ending surgery. Regardless, injury severity can be graded based on changes seen on imaging (e.g., x-ray, MRI), which are often used to plan treatment, prognosis and when an athlete will return to action.
Collins was originally hoping to return in March and he’s pushed himself through rehabilitation sessions and individual basketball workouts throughout the coronavirus crisis, so the news was not surprising. But for it to finally become official was momentous. “When my doc came in and said my shoulder feels like a normal shoulder, that I was good to go, it was like a weight was lifted,” Collins said. “I tell people all the time that he whole rehab process isn’t difficult. It’s just very long and boring. The worst part is not being on the road with the team, not being around them every day, feeling disconnected. It’s weird. Odd. So, mentally, it’s a big struggle. I’m just super excited to be back and know that I can do everything again.”
This has put Collins in a tough spot, as the one thing left on his list for rehab was full contact, basketball action. In an interview for Trail Blazers Courtside, the Blazers' big man gave Rip City an update on his rehab. I definitely think I am on the right track. Right now it's tough because the last part of my development was playing and we can't play right now. I'm just trying to simulate that as much as I can right now without going through contact with other players. It feels really good. Like I said before,.I haven't really had any setbacks in my rehab. From day one it's all been pretty smooth, it's just a long process. But it feels great. I'm really happy with where I'm at. - Zach Collins

http://twitter.com/JamieHudsonNBCS/status/1237105117662330881
Everywhere you looked, there were positive signs in regard to injured players. There was Zach Collins, going through on-court drills with a basketball -- shooting short jumpers and even left-handed layups -- as he recovers from a torn labrum. No full workout with the team yet, but on the court and even shooting with his (injured) left arm. At the other end of the court, there was CJ McCollum working out with coaches -- running full speed as he shot and went through defensive drills -- as he recovers from a sprained ankle.
Zach Collins didn’t know it at the time, but that October night in Dallas, when he bowed his head and nearly cried in an empty locker room, his life was beginning to change for the better. The Trail Blazers starting power forward had just learned that his dislocated left shoulder, suffered in the third quarter of the team’s third game, would keep him out weeks, if not months — and if that didn’t take hold of his Adam’s Apple, the next few days would. For the next six days, he would wrestle with MRI results, second opinions, third opinions, and decisions of whether to have surgery or just rehabilitate the shoulder. He ultimately opted for surgery to repair a torn labrum, and he is not expected back on the court until March at the earliest.
Somewhere between the haze of dashed dreams and the post-surgery pity parties, Collins was confronted by what many professional athletes encounter during a major injury: an identity crisis. During most of his 21 years, basketball was the most defining element of his life. It was what he was best at, how he was recognized, how he managed his stress, and how he viewed himself. And now, basketball was gone until the spring, leaving him with a harrowing question: Who was he? “What else do you have?” Collins remembers asking himself. “And I realized, I don’t have much.”
When the door opened for the media to enter the gym at the Trail Blazer practice facility Monday, there was a surprise spectator watching practice on a sideline bench. Zach Collins, fresh off his surgery last week to repair damage in his left labrum, was back.
“They said I could probably take (the sling) off when I’m home, hopefully next week,” Collins said. “But if I’m out in public, I still have to wear it. The worst part is when I sleep. I always sleep on my side and for some reason, at night all that pain comes back. The last couple of nights were a lot better. I’ve been almost pain free.”
Eddie Sefko: Portland's Zach Collins leaves the court with what looked to be a dislocated left shoulder after grappling for a rebound with Luka Doncic, who gave him a butt-tap on the way off the floor.
Portland Trail Blazers center-forward Zach Collins is recovering at his home in Las Vegas after sustaining a grade 2 sprain in his right ankle during a workout. Collins suffered the sprain and a torn ligament during a workout a couple of weeks ago.
Joe Freeman: After practice, Collins slipped on a black face mask and dived into an individual workout with Blazers' coaches. Looks like he might have to wear that in Las Vegas.
Joe Freeman: Zach Collins suffered a broken nose when he collided with Caleb Swanigan at the end of Tuesday’s summer league practice. The Blazers are holding him out of contact portions of practice the rest of the week, but he said he’ll play in Las Vegas.
After a right quad contusion sidelined the 7-0 rookie out of Gonzaga for all but the first two games of the Trail Blazers’ extended run at the 2017 Las Vegas Summer League, Zach Collins missed the first day of training camp practice due to suffering a concussion during informal workouts on September 22.
Storyline: Zach Collins Injury
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February 28, 2021 | 10:49 am EST Update
Brooklyn, which is clearly all-in on winning a championship, covets Drummond. But sources said three other Eastern Conference playoff-bound teams – Toronto, Boston and Miami – wouldn’t mind taking Drummond off the Cavs’ hand as well. “All of those teams in the East know they need an established and reliable big if they were to face Embiid or Giannis in the playoffs,’’ an Eastern Conference executive said.
With seemingly no inclination to spend money and pay the luxury tax and, with GM Jon Horst having virtually mortgaged the team’s future — he dealt three No. 1 picks (all unprotected) to acquire Jrue Holiday, the Bucks options are clearly limited. One player who could come at a small price and help them is Glenn Robinson III, who was recently released by Sacramento and whom the Bucks have shown interest in in the past. “I think he’s a solid player,’’ a player personnel official said of Robinson. “His shot is pretty good; his defense is pretty good. I think he’d be a handy pickup for a team like the Bucks looking for an off-the-bench guy.’’
Storyline: Glenn Robinson III Free Agency

Ray Allen interested in owning a Seattle SuperSonics stake

The founder of Girls Talk Sports TV, Khristina Williams, asked Allen’s interest in owning a Seattle Sonics stake. “So, I tell people when you believe in something or when you have a goal or idea. You write it down, and then you tell your friend or tell somebody you don’t know. The reason why you do that because you can’t run away from it. Cause a lot of times, and people don’t share their goals because they are afraid if they don’t accomplish them, they are a failure,” said Allen. “Even when you don’t accomplish them, you learned something. You have information, and then you go back to the drawing board. So, we have to give our desires and our dreams to the world to help us inspire. So, the signs tell us everything, and I have put stuff like that into the universe, like one day, I want to run a marathon, run a triathlon, I want to own an NBA team. There are small little things that push you into a direction or away from it.”
“I would love for Seattle to have a team, and I would love to be part of the ownership. When I left Seattle in 07, so many were disenchanted with the ownership, and the one thing that I told them was, this is something people all over the world in any city with a sports team. People were upset with the then owners, and I told them, listen, I wear Seattle on my chest, but I only wear it for a brief time. When I leave, this is your city. You always have to fight for your city, for your team, and the pride of what it is. You cannot lose a sports team in your city because it is a community resource. As an adult you have your frustrations and things that piss you off the dynamics, the politics, but we do things for the kids.
Storyline: Ray Allen NBA Owner?
February 28, 2021 | 6:15 am EST Update

Kevin Love unlikely to return before All-Star break

Cleveland Cavaliers power forward Kevin Love is on this quick two-game trip with his teammates so he can continue to rehab a high-grade strained right calf, but the five-time All-Star is “unlikely” to return until after the NBA All-Star break, league sources tell cleveland.com.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 266 more rumors
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