Below are the other players who received votes for the …

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August 4, 2021 | 12:01 pm EDT Update
Even having been cast aside, Dragic adores the Heat, sources said. Serious veterans appreciate Riley’s commitment to winning. “We never once spoke about Miami as a city,” Butler’s agent, Bernie Lee, told me last year in explaining Butler’s desire to be there. “Obviously it’s an amazing place with amazing people, but Jimmy wasn’t going there for the beach. Since he’s gotten there, I think we have gone out to eat less than 10 times and one of them was the Super Bowl. We didn’t even talk about the tax advantages. The only questions he asked were of the background of the people involved and how they would build out the team.”
The Heat had talks with Bobby Portis, sources said, and the Portis-Adebayo frontcourt would have offered an intriguing combination of shooting and size. Portis would have been Miami’s new and probably superior version of Meyers Leonard and Olynyk — center-ish bigs the Heat paired with Adebayo (another center) because Adebayo can defend anyone, allowing Spoelstra to hide weaker tag-team partners.
Storyline: Bobby Portis Free Agency
What was your original genesis to blockchain and cryptocurrency? Spencer Dinwiddie: Back in 2014, I was told about it. I was a rookie at the time and I was too scared to put my money into it because you hear horror stories about people losing all their money. In 2017, I was a bit more stable in my career so I had a subsequent conversation. I ended up getting in with a small amount of money. I experienced one of the boom markets and I made some money. Then I experienced one of the historic crashes as well. I ended up not making nearly as much money as I would have if I had sold at the top. But that sparked an interest in learning. Markets have cycles like that but the volatility that crypto had, as well as the potential gains, that’s how I got so attracted to it. The concept of turning a thousand dollars into a million dollars was an initial piece in terms of the potential for wealth creation. That sparked a learning curve and that’s just part of what has kept me in this space for the last four or five years. The technology and the ability to change things has kept me, too.
Spencer Dinwiddie: I think what we learned through NBA Top Shot, NFTs and the NBA as a whole is that there is definitely a market for collectibles in sports — just like baseball cards. It’s been that way through the dawn of time in that space because of verified scarcity. With the NFT boom and collapse, we also learned that just like anything else, you can’t overdo it. It has to be something we as a fan base and consumers genuinely think is valuable and have thought is valuable. If you just strap an NFT to a leaf that fell off a tree, during the boom, that’s cool. But there is no market for that. That’s what I’m most excited about for Calaxy. When these things look like apples to apples, it becomes a market and that’s tradeable. It’s not going to be like the NFT experience of this past spring where everybody tried to do a one-off art collab but there was no real market that was able to standardize these things and allow them to really pair up value to see what happened.
August 4, 2021 | 11:13 am EDT Update