Fred Katz: Bradley Beal making All-NBA does not make hi…

More on Bradley Beal Extension?

Beal is “more so giving (Sheppard) a chance now that he’s in charge,” someone with knowledge of Beal’s thinking told me Thursday. “If (there’s) no progress, he’ll get moved with a big paycheck.”
“I guess just legacy at the end of the day. This is where I’ve been for the last seven years, going on eight, and I have an opportunity to turn this thing around,” Beal said, explaining his motivation. “It’s a beautiful market. I love it. I love D.C. This is where I’ve always wanted to be, and this is where I want to be for the rest of my career.”
“The whole summer, everybody was [saying]: ‘You need to go here. You need to go there. You shouldn’t sign it.’ Okay, that’s easier said than done,” Beal said. “It’s easy to think it’s all about money, when it’s not. And it’s easy to think, ‘Oh, you’re just comfortable,’ and that isn’t the case, either.”
Beal did several interviews in recent weeks where he said he had not thought much about the extension, which was first offered on July 26. Technically, that's true as he left much of the negotiating to his agent. But there were some moments along the way that gave him clarity. One was a meeting in Chicago last month between him, his representatives and Wizards' brass.
According to multiple people familiar with the negotiation process, Wizards managing partner Ted Leonsis flew to Chicago along with the team's general manager Tommy Sheppard and other executives. They met at the offices of Priority Sports with Beal's team of agents led by Mark Bartelstein and Beal was able to ask questions about where the organization was headed.
The Wizards made sweeping changes to their front office and coaching staff over the summer. They also reworked their roster to create financial flexibility and replace veterans with young players that present upside. What the Wizards had to sell Beal on was a view of the future that can't necessarily be proven in the short-term. Beal had a lot to consider ahead of the Oct. 21 deadline to make his decision, but ultimately gave all sides the go-ahead to strike a deal. "I just felt comfortable with where we were going," Beal said. "I talked to Ted and they kind of projected the future and gave me the layout of what we can do in the future."
Beal, it turns out, wasn't leaving the Wizards in the dark completely despite taking months to decide on his new contract. According to a person familiar with his thinking, Beal was up front with the Wizards on his plans, indicating early on that they wouldn't string the Wizards along. The silence on his part was a good thing, not a bad thing. If he wanted out, he would have told the Wizards from the get-go.

https://twitter.com/WashWizards/status/1184882892670996482
Candace Buckner: “The two-year (deal) doesn’t alter the decision of my commitment here.” — Bradley Beal. The original offer was for three years but Beal said he left the decision (to go two years with a player option) up to his agent bc he wanted to be in a “well position” at Year 10.
Tim Bontemps: The number one topic of discussion among scouts and executives over the past couple months has been when, or if, Bradley Beal will be traded. Now that he won’t be, as @Adrian Wojnarowski reports his extension agreement in DC, the league’s biggest potential trade piece is now off the board.
Fred Katz: The Wizards have insisted to anyone who would listen that Bradley Beal wasn’t available in any kind of trade talks. Well, this is why. Beal extends effectively for one season (player option on the second year) and the Wizards move forward with their guy.
Albert Nahmad: Bradley Beal can’t be traded for 6 months. But his 15% trade bonus becomes active the moment he signs the extension. So if he’s traded after that, it could create a serious windfall (effectively making extension pay more than his true free agent max). And he’d be full Bird after.
Beal’s contract terms (extension terms bolded): 2019-20: $27,093,018 2020-21: $28,751,774 2021-22: $34,502,129 2022-23: $37,262,299 (player option)

http://twitter.com/YoggiMane/status/1184820307493654529
Candace Buckner: Can confirm Bradley Beal has agreed to an extension with the #Wizards. "This is where he wants to be. He's made it clear." -- Beal's agent Mark Bartelstein said. Beal WANTS to be part of the team's rebuild. Extension first reported by @Adrian Wojnarowski
As part of the extension, Bradley Beal has a 15% trade kicker. The guard also has unique language when it comes to the player option in 2022-23. From when the extension is signed and until June 2023, Beal can decline or exercise the option. Because a player option is excluded when factoring in the value of the trade bonus at the time of the trade, opting-in to the last year would increase the bonus owed. The trade kicker could range between $6-9M. Beal is not eligible to be traded until after the 2019-20 season because the first year of his extension is greater than 5% from his 2020-21 salary.
David Aldridge: Bradley Beal’s agent, Mark Bartlestein, on the extension (@Adrian Wojnarowski first): “in his perfect world, Bradley wants to be a Wizard...he wants to win in D.C.”
David Aldridge: Ted Leonsis convinced Beal through the summer that he would use all resources to quickly rebuild the team. “Ted is all in,” Bartlestein said. “Brad knows it won’t happen overnight. But one thing he’s learned the last year or so is, he loves to lead.”
In a commitment carrying league-wide ramifications, Washington Wizards All-Star guard Bradley Beal has agreed to extend his deal for two years on a $72 million maximum contract, agent Mark Bartelstein of Priority Sports told ESPN on Thursday morning. Beal's extension, which begins with the 2021-22 season, includes a player option for 2022-23 that keeps him out of free agency for three more seasons -- and guarantees him nearly $130 million over four years.
"This was a long process that really covered the entire summer and fall, including numerous conversations and meetings among Ted, Tommy, myself and Brad," Bartelstein told ESPN. "This was probably going to be the most important decision that Brad was going to make in his career and we wanted to give Ted and Tommy every opportunity to present their vision for the franchise. And they've genuinely done a wonderful job of getting Brad excited about the future and how they plan to build the Wizards team around him.
Adrian Wojnarowski: "Bradley Beal has two years left on his deal and the Wizards have not given up hope on signing him to an extension. They have had a three-year, $111 million extension on the table for him to take in any form. Does he want two years, three years? Any form he wants... it is they're waiting for him. They are nowhere near the idea of moving Bradley Beal. They want to continue to try to rebuild around him, get John Wall back healthy, but because there are no big unrestricted free agents this summer... You know in 2021 Giannis Antetokounmpo is out there, but only one team can get him. Bradley Beal if he got on the market would bring back an absolute ransom because if you want to improve your team in a dramatic way, he'd be the guy. But Washington is not doing that. They still want to re-sign him."
But from the way Beal was talking during Monday’s media day, there’s one thing for certain: No matter what he elects to do, his thought process will go beyond the money. “I can really retire today and be OK. … So, I want everybody to understand, it’s not the money. It’s not the money factor here,” Beal told The Athletic. “It’s me. It’s, OK, what’s the direction the team’s going in? Are we gonna win? Is this what we want? “We know that this is probably gonna be a development year. It’s gonna be one of those types of years. So, does Bradley Beal wanna be a part of that ultimately? And that’s something I have to ask myself and something I’m probably still not done asking myself. So, I’m gonna use all my time until I can.”
Beal insists he’s barely thought about the three-year extension the Wizards offered on July 26, the first day they were eligible to put the contract in front of him. He has since witnessed the birth of his second son, Braylon, who he says has been his concentration. “I’ve been thinking about that and just honestly letting my agent and (chairman) Ted (Leonsis) and (general manager) Tommy (Sheppard) just kinda work through those details,” he said. “The deal’s on the table, but I’m definitely taking my time and just evaluating what’s best for my family. I still have two years on my deal, so I’m not in no type of rush.”
“This league is wide open,” one person who works in a rival front office said via text message. “Take any of the what, eight contenders, right now. I think if you add an All-Star to any of them, they become the title favorite. Everyone is hungrier than ever to win. Sure you could trade for Kevin Love, Blake (Griffin), maybe (DeMar) DeRozan, but they all come with question marks. Bradley Beal fits on every team. He’s 26 with two years left under contract and you’d expect him to be available soon.”
Fred Katz: Bradley Beal on the status of the $111.7M extension offer the Wizards have made him: "I still have two years on my deal, so I’m not in no type of rush.” Full quote here:
A source close to Beal said he would be surprised if Beal accepts the extension offer by the Oct. 21 deadline and instead expects him to see how things go with the Wizards this season before making any decisions on his future. Beal — who feels some measure of loyalty to the Wizards, according to the associate — has not given the Wizards any indication that he wants to leave, and the Wizards would not consider making him available in trade talks unless it becomes clear to them that they would lose him in free agency in 2021.
So what is Bradley Beal thinking about his contract extension? Nothing, he told NBC Sports Washington's Chris Miller in the latest episode of Wizards Talk podcast. "Honestly you might slap me, but I haven't thought about it," Beal said. "I'm just getting better and letting my agent, Tommy [Sheppard] and everybody else deal with it. "I just go hoop. Every day I see somebody and they ask 'Beal, you leaving?' and I'm like 'I'm still living in D.C., I ain't going nowhere.'"
Tommy Sheppard: “So we've never considered anything other than a situation where Brad is with us and leading us forward. We made that clear to him on the first day we could offer him an extension, and we'll continue to make that clear."
Washington Wizards shooting guard Bradley Beal, a top Heat target as 2021 free agency approaches, hasn’t decided whether to accept Washington’s three-year, $111 million extension or what his long-term future holds, an associate said this week. Agent Mark Bartelstein (who is not the aforementioned associate) said Wednesday there is “nothing new” regarding whether Beal has made a decision.
John Wall, though, sees it differently and his opinion carries some weight. Not only does he know Beal well, having been his teammate for seven years. But he has also been in that situation before, wondering if he should take the money now or roll the dice, even if the odds are good the gamble will pay off. Wall has thought about Beal's situation a lot and thinks there is a good chance he takes the Wizards' offer.
"I think he will sign it," Wall said at his annual backpack giveaway on Saturday in Prince George's County, MD. "Brad's a very smart guy. He's going to make the best decision for himself and the organization. He enjoys D.C. I mean, he won the Community Assist Award for all the things he did here. He loves playing with me."
David Aldridge: So, bookkeeping: the Wizards made their three-year, $111 max extension offer to Bradley Beal today, the first day they’re eligible to do so, per sources. Beal, unsurprisingly, is not signing it immediately, if at all. While grateful for the gesture, and while wanting to not abandon the team as it approaches a likely rough season, obvious questions remain about the team’s short- and long-term plans during the prime of his career. And Beal also remains eligible for the much more lucrative supermax after next season, if he makes one of the three all-NBA teams for Washington after next season. The sides will continue what have been amiable discussions next week.
Fred Katz: Nerd PSA: Just about everyone, myself included, has referred to the contract extension the Wizards will offer Bradley Beal tomorrow as worth a projected $111 million over three years. But just did the math: It’s actually closer to $112 million ($111,786,897 to be exact).
There has been no mystery for the Wizards and their intentions to offer All-Star shooting guard Bradley Beal a contract extension this Friday, July 26, the first day that they can. General manager Tommy Sheppard told ESPN their plan to offer Beal the full max, projected at $111 million over three years, a contract that would begin with the 2021-22 season. Wizards managing partner Ted Leonsis then reiterated as much following the team's press conference on Monday to introduce their new front office leadership.
Leonsis doesn't know what Beal will ultimately decide, but he does believe it will take time before the team hears his verdict. "I don't expect Bradley Beal to say 'thank you' and sign the contract when Tommy goes to see him on the 26th," Leonsis said.
“I talk to Bradley all the time. I’ve previewed everything that we’re doing all along the way. But I don’t expect Bradley — just like you shouldn’t expect me to do an interview with someone in two hours and say, ‘Okay!’ I’m not going to be waiting there, Tommy’s not going to be waiting there for a signature,” Leonsis said. “He’ll want to meet all these people. He’ll want to see what our plans are. But Brad knows he’s respected, he’s loved and we’re committed. And I’m hoping that he believes in this new NBA where it’s two players and a great rotation that ‘Why not us?’
Washington Wizards general manager Tommy Sheppard will offer guard Bradley Beal a three-year, $111 million maximum contract extension upon the All-Star becoming eligible to sign on Friday, Sheppard told ESPN. "At the very first moment allowed, we are going to offer Brad the full max extension," Sheppard told ESPN.
Beal, 26, has until Oct. 21 to sign the extension, which would start with the 2021-22 season --- a decision that agent Mark Bartelstein indicates that Beal will need time to consider. "There are moments in a career where there are big decisions to make, and Brad will work through everything and figure out the right thing to do," Bartelstein told ESPN. "There are nothing but great feelings for Ted [Leonsis], Tommy and Scott [Brooks]. They've treated Brad wonderfully."
Beal has another decision looming this week, as the Wizards can offer Beal a three-year, $111 million contract extension on Friday. Although Bartelstein said he and Beal have remained in contact with newly appointed general manager Tommy Sheppard as well as Ted Leonsis, there is no rush to come to an agreement on the upcoming offer. “We’ll talk to the Wizards. We’ve been talking to the Wizards. Those are things we have to figure out in terms of what’s the right thing for everyone,” Bartelstein said. “We’re not locked in on specific dates in terms of all that. There’s nothing that needs to be decided at this moment. There’s a lot for Brad to consider. Ted and the entire Wizards organization have been nothing but spectacular to us.”
On July 26, the Wizards can officially offer Beal a contract extension worth approximately $111 million over three years. But there is a long list of clues that suggest he will not take the offer.
Beal’s upcoming decision on a contract extension looms large over the team’s future. On July 26, exactly three years after Beal signed his supermax deal, the Wizards can officially present a three-year, $111 million extension. The team has previously indicated it plans to give Beal the offer, and both the player’s camp and the franchise have remained in contact throughout the summer.
A trade seemed like the farthest thing on Beal’s mind at the NBA Summer League. He squeezed in quality time with the Wizards before jetting to Atlanta to support his own AAU team. Inside Thomas & Mack Center on UNLV’s campus, Beal laughed easily and appeared relaxed, not at all stressed about his future. Still, many within the NBA wonder if this happy scene will merely stay in Vegas. “If he doesn’t accept [the extension],” said a rival general manager, “it will be a big blow to Washington.”
Beal, who has two years remaining on his five-year, $127 million contract, told The Washington Post that he was “definitely” open to discussing an extension. “I have thought about it but I haven’t really full-out processed it,” he said, in an interview at the Barker Hangar following his award presentation on Monday. “I still have two years left. We just drafted Rui [Hachimura] and I want to see what we do in free agency before I make the ultimate decision. I haven’t even been offered it officially. Until that happens, I’ll wait and think about it. I’ll have an ample amount of time to process everything and make a decision when the time is right.
“I’d be naive to say I wouldn’t be [interested in extension talks]. Washington is where I’ve been the last seven years, going on eight. It would be great to play in one place forever. But at the same time, you want to win and make sure you’re in a position to do so. I’m definitely going to evaluate who we hire as the GM and who we pick up on the team. All that plays a factor.”
Albert Nahmad: Players eligible for “super-max” this summer if earn All-NBA honors: - Kemba Walker: 5/$221M (starting 2019-20) - Klay Thompson: 5/$221M (starting 2019-20) - Bradley Beal: $4/191M (starting 2021-22) - Damian Lillard: 4/$191M (5/$247M if signed next summer) (starting 2021-22)
If Beal gets All-NBA honors, he will be eligible for a supermax contract. It wouldn't begin until the 2021-22 season, but it is projected to be worth $194 million over four years. His deal would start at over $40 million annually. The Wizards already have John Wall signed to a supermax deal, which kicks in next season. He will be making $43.9 million in 2021-22. He and Beal would account for roughly three-quarters of the salary cap that season.
As long as Beal, who turns 26 in June, remains an All-Star talent and under contract, they have options. If they felt they had to trade him, they could get plenty of assets in return. It would just be a difficult and possibly ugly process to go through. It all hinges on the All-NBA announcement. If Beal doesn't make the team, everyone moves on like nothing happened. If he does get it, everything changes for him, the Wizards and their offseason.
The Wizards could, in theory, sign Beal to a supermax and just deal with it later. They would have two full seasons before the contract begins. By then, Wall should be healthy and have at least a full year of games under his belt and maybe more if he returns next season. But delaying the inevitable is not a sound strategy. If extending Beal backfires either as a singular move or in conjunction with Wall's deal, it could strap the franchise for many years to come. All of this makes a supermax offer in the event Beal becomes eligible potentially a decision so massive it could be the most important call the next GM makes in their entire tenure in Washington. And that GM may have to make that decision within months of taking the job.
Storyline: Bradley Beal Extension?
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Pau, 41, confirmed his retirement on COPE, stating that he will now reflect and assess his future, while he has not decided about retirement yet. He spent the previous season with FC Barcelona. During his time with the senior Spanish NT, he has won 11 medals in three different international competitions, including gold in the 2006 FIBA World Cup and gold at the 2009, 2011 and 2015 EuroBasket.
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