Minnesota officials remain motivated in landing Simmons…

Minnesota officials remain motivated in landing Simmons. That would be nothing short of a home run fulfilling the Timberwolves’ ongoing search for a starting forward, and Simmons could do so in a playmaking role similar to Draymond Green. But it would be challenging for Minnesota to send back enough talent for Philly to reroute in a hypothetical Lillard pursuit, while still adding Simmons to a rising young Minnesota core.

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Each of Minnesota, Golden State, Sacramento and San Antonio has been consistently linked as a top Simmons destination, yet the overwhelming sense among league insiders continues to be that Simmons, for now, is expected to remain a Sixer once training camp opens on September 28—barring a change of temperature with Damian Lillard in Portland. That appears to be the ever-important undercurrent to what has been routinely described as a "James Harden-like" package Philadelphia is seeking for any Simmons return.
If it does, Rosas will try to get back in with some kind of multi-team trade that nets Morey the win-now return that he covets while getting one of the best defensive players in the game to offensive-minded Minnesota. He has not completely given up on the possibility of adding Simmons, sources say, which falls in line with his previous playing of the market.
In Minnesota, while the Wolves would certainly need Simmons to shoot more than zero times in the fourth quarter, they wouldn’t need him to be a No. 2 option on offense. Karl-Anthony Towns, Anthony Edwards and D’Angelo Russell (the Timberwolves view Russell as a part of the core and want to keep it that way, sources said) give coach Chris Finch three accomplished offensive players to get buckets down the stretch.
Storyline: Ben Simmons to Timberwolves?
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July 3, 2022 | 9:45 am EDT Update
Trevelin Queen’s basketball journey is an example of relentlessness and perseverance. It’s a journey that includes attending two high schools — being ineligible to play at one — having zero scholarship offers, attending three junior colleges, living in a car, and going undrafted. Yet, Queen has always found ways to weather through obstacles even when it would have been easy to give up. “It’s all part of the process,” said the 25-year-old, who, on Friday, signed a two-year contract with the 76ers that is partially guaranteed for $300,000 next season.
However, he’s one of the headliners on the team that will participate in this week’s Salt Lake City Summer League before traveling to Las Vegas for the NBA2K23 Summer league. And he’ll try to earn a rotation spot on the Sixers’ 15-man roster this upcoming season. For motivation, he can look at what he’s overcome. “I never got discouraged,” he said of his journey. “I knew it was bigger than me. I knew I had to keep going. If I quit, I’m not just letting myself down, I’m letting my family down and everybody who invested in me. So for me, it’s always been bigger than me.”
Brown is excited about the new opportunity in Sacramento, but he will always treasure his time with Kerr, Warriors general manager Bob Myers and the players he coached, including Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson and Draymond Green. “The first thing is, my time here, obviously, was fantastic, starting with ownership to Bob to Steve and all the players, I couldn’t ask for anything better,” Brown said. “But the fans, too, the fans, they were great. Whether it was here in the arena or me walking around town or riding my little scooter around town, everybody’s always been fantastic. So, it’s a little surreal walking in here and walking into this locker room instead of the other locker room, but at the end of the day, I’m excited and I’m looking forward to all the energy up in Sacramento.”
In a recent appearance on the ‘Getcha Popcorn Ready’ podcast hosted by Terrell Owens and Matthew Hatchette, the ex-Lakers coach went off after being asked if he felt that the modern analytics movement “ruined the game”: Via fubo Sports: “Absolutely. I really started to see a change when I got to the Lakers as a coach because they used that so much as a weapon, ‘well, the analytics tells us..’ I understand the analytics. You’ve got to shoot more threes. But you can’t more threes if you have guys that can’t shoot. I said, ‘So what does that analytics telling you?’”
Storyline: Old School vs. New School