Jusuf Nurkic: Brate @Pau Gasol Hall of famer 🙌🏻 ❤️ Buena suerte hermano en los siguientes desafíos. 💪🏻

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Eurohoops: Pau Gasol: I want to make a special mention to Kobe Bryant. I'd very much like him to be here but life is sometimes very unfair. He taught me how to be a better leader, better competitor, what it meant to be a winner.
Eurohoops: Pau Gasol made a huge effort to recover from injury and return to playing last season with Barcelona. The reason? His baby daughter Elisabet Gianna. "I wanted to fight for the improbable. I had the dream of playing in front of my [baby] girl and we fought for that"
Pau Gasol: 'I am here to announce that I am retiring from professional basketball. It is a difficult and thoughtful decision. I wanted to end up playing basketball and enjoying it, not with crutches. I'm very grateful for having been able to do it at FC Barcelona and for being able to play my fifth Olympic Games with the National Team".
Pau Gasol: "I keep thinking about my future, I don't see myself on any team other than Barça." On retirement: "I keep thinking about whether to continue or not. It will not be an easy decision and when I know it I will let you know. I have been a professional for 23 years and I am considering all the factors to make a decision soon and be able to communicate it. I have not made a decision 100 percent. If I look back it has been many years enjoying very interesting things."
Pau, 41, confirmed his retirement on COPE, stating that he will now reflect and assess his future, while he has not decided about retirement yet. He spent the previous season with FC Barcelona. During his time with the senior Spanish NT, he has won 11 medals in three different international competitions, including gold in the 2006 FIBA World Cup and gold at the 2009, 2011 and 2015 EuroBasket.
After winning his first Spanish ACB League championship title in 20 years, Pau Gasol didn’t give a certain answer on whether this was his final game with a club. Gasol had said many times that Game 2 of the Finals vs. Real Madrid could be his “last match in Palau.” Following the match, he didn’t want to shut that door completely.
Pau Gasol aims to help FC Barcelona capture its 19th domestic title and third of his own. His return in February receiving an enthusiastic response from the fans has been followed by strong outings all the way up to the best-of-three series determining the Spanish league champion. “This can be my last game,” he admitted in the buildup to Finals Game 2 planned to be held Tuesday evening at Barca’s home court, “I have been thinking for years that my last game could have been a long time ago due to the injuries. These thoughts have crossed my mind.”
Pau Gasol is back in professional basketball after announcing his intent to rejoin the team that launched his career, FC Barcelona. The two-time NBA champion last played in 2019, splitting his final year between the San Antonio Spurs and Milwaukee Bucks. After spending the past few seasons recovering from a foot injury, Gasol is looking forward to his new opportunity. "I've enjoyed a fantastic basketball career. I'm working to see if I can enjoy it a little longer, prolong it for at least a few more months," Gasol told CNN Sport.
Gasol thinks his learned ability to "quiet the chatter in your mind" helped him during the Lakers' championship runs in 2009 and 2010. Now, he wants to impart the wisdom he's gained through coaching to other people. "For someone to be able to share those ideas, concepts, mindsets into our lives and to help us grow and develop that stuff, that's also what life is about, right?" he said.
Gasol has signed up to be an advisor with employee wellness and coaching company BetterUp. He hopes that his experiences can help organizations shape policies that benefit its employees. Beyond BetterUp, he's also looking to directly help other organizations, from the NBA to the Olympics. "I'm researching and contacting a lot of [NBA] owners and executives to see what they have in mind [...] and how I could help their franchise and maybe build a winning culture," he said. "I'm a candidate for the Athletes Commission for the IOC, I hope that I might be elected to be part of the Athletes Commission and contribute to the growth and progress of the Olympics."
Pau Gasol said that he will decide on whether he will continue playing or retire in the next month or 90s days. The two-time NBA champion and Spanish national team great has been trying to recover his left foot after undergoing surgery for a fracture in 2019.
“This pandemic, along with all the bad that has brought us, is giving me a little more room to rehabilitate the foot and the progression is being positive,” Gasol said in a video interview for Spanish news agency EFE, per Marca. “In the next month or month and a half, my level of exigency on the court will be very high, and there I will find out if I can compete again.”
With the NBA suspended indefinitely and the Tokyo Olympics postponed to 2021, Gasol is afforded more time—without missing any potential games—as he recovers from May 2019 foot surgery. “Right now I focus on what I can control, which is trying to get healthy and get my foot right and try to get that bone to heal, which is a difficult bone that didn’t heal the way I expected it to when I joined the [Portland] Trail Blazers,” Gasol said. “I’m just focusing on that—making sure my foot heals and I have the chance potentially to play professional basketball again.”
Remaining at home in Northern California amid the pandemic, Gasol is able to devote as much time as he can to rest, recovery and rehabilitation. He said he typically does a two-hour workout before lunch each day as well as therapy and rehab on his foot. He follows video workouts sent to him by his trainer. “Obviously my life has been affected and my rehab process has been affected, but that doesn’t mean I cannot continue to work out and continue to follow my therapy to the extent I can,” Gasol said. “It’s not ideal, but I can do it at a high level.”
Gasol foresees a future in an executive capacity, wanting to be part of management of a franchise while growing a winning culture. “One step at a time,” Gasol said. “Everything is still up in the air. There’s still so many unknowns, so until we start getting more answers and more clarity from my personal health standpoint and in the professional sports view and stage, it’s too early to put some thought into that.”
With the league's current campaign suspended indefinitely due to the global outbreak of the coronavirus, Gasol, who will turn 40 years old in July, is contemplating retirement at this point of his career. "With this recovery process and the injury that I have been dealing with for more than a year, it's undoubtedly inevitable to think about retirement," Gasol said in an interview with the Spanish newspaper El País, via NBC Sports. "Also, taking into account that I will be 40 years old in a few months. So, [retirement] is definitely on my mind."
"It's something that will come one time, sooner or later," Gasol said of retirement. "We hope that time hasn't come yet. But I also take the opportunity to focus on the Gasol Foundation and other off-court projects. And also think of what my next professional stage may be, my next challenges. All this while I'm still recovering, trying to give myself a chance to keep playing. Now, the priority is to overcome this pandemic among all. Everything else is completely secondary."
I always wondered about both you and Mark when you reach the very end of your careers. Would you go back and play a year professionally in Spain, just to kind of round out your career start where you came from? Did that ever interest you? Pau Gasol: Yeah, yeah. No, it had appeal for sure. And interest but, and I said it since I kind of left Spain or FC Barcelona to come to the NBA. But I always kind of said, you know, the longer I play in the NBA, which I love, it's going to be harder for me to go back and play one year in Spain. Marc [Gasol] has said this thing recently that he would love to play us last year in China that he played for before he came to the NBA and it means so much to him, just like Barcelona means to me, but, but we'll see. Maybe works out maybe it's in the books, maybe It's not. Again, it has a certain appeal. But, but I still like to play in the best league with the best players.
“It’s something that will come one time, sooner or later. We hope that time hasn’t come yet. But I also take the opportunity to focus on the Gasol Foundation and other off-court projects. And also think of what my next professional stage may be, my next challenges. All this while I’m still recovering, trying to give myself a chance to keep playing. Now, the priority is to overcome this pandemic among all. Everything else is completely secondary.”
Gasol admitted that there are retirement thoughts circling in his mind. After all, he becomes 40 years old in July. “It’s a possibility that there is there too. I’ll have 40 springs this summer, which is not a small number. I understand that sooner or later, whether this summer, next season or another, my retirement is inevitable. I hope not already,” Gasol added. “I hope that the foot recovers so that it can allow me to play a little more. We will see how much more. Enjoy one last season.”
Kerry Eggers: Terry Stotts says @Pau Gasol will return to PDX next week after rehabbing his foot in Spain. Will he join Blazers coaching staff? “Depends on his rehab. He’s having some procedures done & that’s taking up his time right now.” Does he still intend to play? “You’ll have to ask him."
39-year-old Pau Gasol has not yet finished his career and was in Porto for another diagnosis. “It’s been an intense few days of travel and medical appointments to gather opinions to make the best decision for my recovery.”, he posted on Instagram.
You're beginning your 19th season in the NBA. You never know if it will be the last one, but you'll turn 40 in 2020. For the first time, your future seems somewhat uncertain. Do you have more doubts than other times? Will it be your last year? Pau Gasol: "I am not worried about the future. I understand that my career is about to end. It is something that I have been assimilating these years. I am sure that my career as a basketball player will end in a little while. It won't be much more, as much as I love playing. There is uncertainty about what will happen after, but I have been training to have different options, objectives and responsibilities. Activity will never be missing. I would like to have space to work with an organisation, a team or an organisation within the sport. I will also look for flexibility to be with my family. For now, I want to continue enjoying this stage as a player, although I know that the chapter, or the book, will end. Then another chapter will begin and we will continue writing good pages."
Is it because as a young man the coaches prompted you to work and now that you have grown older you understand them more? Pau Gasol: "The truth is yes, [laughs]. It could be. All I try is to be useful and contribute, and have a positive impact on the team. The rest is an anecdote." I could see you more as a coach. Pau Gasol: "I would like to have a general life change and more flexibility to dedicate myself to several different things because a coach's job is the player's life, but with more dedication, with less free time and spending more hours. That would allow me to do less. I have many concerns and I want to have time."
All that said, Gasol’s future with the Spurs beyond this season is a mystery. But no matter the outcome of his time in San Antonio, Gasol is not considering retirement. He still believes there is more basketball to be played and plans to do so until he feels ready to step away. “In two summers, I might think about it a little more,” Gasol said. “It might be an option then, maybe. And maybe not because I love what I do. I work my ass off to do what I do at this stage, to keep up with the pace of the game and the progress and the development of the game today. I take pride in that. That’s what makes me who I am.”
Pau Gasol: "I'm not thinking about retirement yet, although I know that it will happen sooner than later."

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The Spanish big man recently touched on his playing career, as well as re-signing with the San Antonio Spurs, where he made it clear, he is looking to play as many seasons he can in the NBA. "I want to play the maximum number of seasons, as long as I feel good. I have played 16-years in the NBA and I hope to play some more, but I have to keep working and respect any injuries, as I have so far."
As for re-signing with the Spurs after opting out of his deal, Pau says both sides are looking forward to getting a deal done and is hoping to reach an agreement soon. Pau also spoke on the West getting stronger this offseason, saying the Spurs are still one of the best in the West. "All the teams in the West, especially the top teams, are getting much stronger to compete and try to beat the first level of teams, like the Spurs."
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In the aftermath of Sunday night’s 125-102 loss to the Jazz, Aaron Gordon offered perhaps the most forceful defense Nikola Jokic has ever received from a teammate regarding officiating. “It’s crazy that Jok doesn’t get more free throws,” Gordon began. “Jok was 3 for 3 from the free-throw line. That’s unbelievable. … The fact that Jok was 3 for 3 from the free-throw line is just not even right. He’s fouled every play. Obviously, the refs aren’t going to call it every play. They’re all over his arms, they’re all over his body, they’re grabbing him. He’s just not officiated the same way as everybody else. “It’s not right,” Gordon continued. “He’s the reigning MVP of the league, and he’s getting three free throws a game, still doing what he’s doing. But he needs more foul calls because they’re fouling. It’s not like begging, it’s not asking for something that’s not there. We’re just asking for him to be officiated like everybody else is being officiated because that’s not right. He’s being fouled all the time. He needs more foul calls.”
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Former Thunder Gabriel Deck is back with Real Madrid

Following a brief NBA stint, Gabriel Deck is back for Real Madrid, head coach Pablo Laso confirmed Sunday. “We are talking about a player who has been determinant in each team he has already played. He will help us a lot. He will give us a lot of options on both sides of the court,” noted the experienced tactician after the ACB Regular Season Round 18 home win opposite Casademont Zaragoza, “The first time he came, we knew he would grow with us. He understands the game, he can play in and out, and his versatility is useful.”
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For years, Robertson would be shunned from a league that never attempted to find a place for him. But the players, the owners and the game won because Robertson demanded more. His fight delayed the merger of the NBA and the ABA for six years, and the 1976 settlement resulted in the Oscar Robertson Rule, which pushed players toward free agency and helped establish the modern NBA. “People tried to pooh-pooh that,” Robertson said of the rule that bears his name, “like it didn’t change basketball. It changed basketball forever. How could a player make $50 million a year playing basketball? I took a lot of heat for it. I’m still taking heat for it, I guess. But I think the Oscar Robertson Rule is really what propelled basketball to where it is today. Can you imagine guys sitting on the bench, averaging three or four points a game, making $10 million? I’m happy for them because I think it was on my watch that all these things happened. I just want people to know it.”
Robertson spoke to The Washington Post in advance of the NBA’s Martin Luther King Jr. celebration and near the anniversary of one of the most pivotal nights in league history: Jan. 14, 1964. That was when players locked arms inside a locker room at Boston Garden and threatened to strike during the first live-televised All-Star Game unless the league’s owners recognized their union and provided basic necessities, such as a trainer on every staff. Negotiations between the players and the owners, barricaded on the other side of the locker room, were contentious. “They received some real vile language while they were in there,” Robertson said with a laugh of the owners. They conceded to the players’ requests, and the game was played, with Robertson earning MVP honors. “From that point on, the association went forward. It elevated the players from being sandlot players to being real pros.”