Sarah K. Spencer: Onyeka Okongwu has been doing more li…

Sarah K. Spencer: Onyeka Okongwu has been doing more live work, per Nate McMillan. In the next couple days, he’ll go to the Skyhawks to play 5-on-5 in practice. “We slowly are trying to build him up.” After a couple practices, they’ll see if Okongwu can play in a G League game, per McMillan.

More on Onyeka Okongwu Injury

Atlanta Hawks center Onyeka Okongwu -- the sixth overall pick in the 2020 NBA draft -- underwent surgery to repair a torn labrum in his right shoulder on Wednesday, and he will miss approximately six months, sources told ESPN. Okongwu's role grew as the season wore on for the Hawks, but a lingering injury beginning in May resulted in the need for the procedure. Renowned surgeon Dr. Neal ElAttrache of Kerlan-Jobe performed the procedure on Okongwu in Los Angeles, sources said.
Chris Kirschner: For tonight’s game vs. Cleveland: Trae Young (left quad soreness) is probable. Clint Capela (left heel pain) is questionable. Onyeka Okongwu (right adductor soreness) is questionable. Dunn, Reddish and Hunter are out.
Kevin Chouinard: Hawks say that For tonight’s game vs. LA Lakers: Trae Young (left knee soreness) is probable. Onyeka Okongwu (left Achilles soreness) is questionable. Dunn, Bogdanovic, Hunter are out.
Sarah K. Spencer: Per the Hawks, Kris Dunn has cartilage disruption in his right knee and can do modified workouts. Okongwu still has inflammation in his sesamoid bone; he's limited to shooting/conditioning. Snell has inflammation in his right cuboid bone; he's limited to shooting/conditioning. pic.twitter.com/p0Ud2j9gQB

http://twitter.com/sarah_k_spence/status/1333517882152660995
Sarah K. Spencer: Onyeka Okongwu says he got a second MRI done on his foot and it has improved since the last time he had it checked. So, positive news on that front. Says he thinks it won't limit him in the season.
Storyline: Onyeka Okongwu Injury
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January 16, 2022 | 12:36 pm EST Update
How would you describe your game? Your dominance at the end of the Hapoel game as a 4 was impressive, your controlled the game. It was like that for 40 minutes. In this respect, it is possible to watch you at much higher levels. How do you see the possibility of returning to the NBA? Bonzie Colson: It has been my target since I came here. That’s my goal and also having played in Europe will help me when I get there. Playing in the NBA is easier than playing in Europe. There is more space. The three-second rule doesn’t exist here. There are many different rules. That’s why players are constantly changing places. Scoring is easier in the NBA. Because first of all, much more space is opening up. Also here are more systems. Every country has a system. A running game is being played in Spain. There is a game based on the physical struggle in Turkey. Every country has a different style of basketball. The NBA is opening up. There is a system, but you can’t be as aggressive as here. In Europe, you can be aggressive, push, hit, do a lot of things, but in the NBA you can’t do that. That’s why some of the players who play here look good there.
Traveling to Europe after your Bucks career… At what point did you decide it’s (the NBA) not working anymore? Bonzie Colson: I wouldn’t say it wasn’t working anymore. I was young, well I’m still young, so I decided I could do a year overseas and then come back (to the NBA). Scouts are still looking overseas, I could try something new. Then COVID hit, so I knew I was kind of in-between Europe and the NBA. So far has been a great opportunity. My goal is still to get back to the NBA for sure but I think it was great to do that and I’ve been doing well.
The National Basketball Association is offering virtual courtside seats on Meta’s $299 Oculus Quest 2 devices. The headsets were one of the most popular Christmas gifts in 2021, showing that people seem to be more willing than ever to give virtual reality a try. And businesses are trying to keep your eyeballs on their content by creating VR versions of their apps and games. The NBA experience is free and available on Meta’s Horizon Venues platform, which is a free software download for the Oculus headset. People appear as digital avatars, sort of like cartoon versions of their real selves, and watch an NBA game from a courtside perspective. It’s not Jack Nicholson’s Los Angeles Lakers seat at Crypto.com Arena or Spike Lee’s seat at Madison Square Garden, but it almost replicates the real thing.
As the Celtics were up 23-18 in the first quarter, one avatar approached me to ask for assistance on watching. I was confused at first, as my stream was fine, but it became clear the real person behind the avatar had a bad connection or was restricted due to local blackout rules. That prompted him to label the NBA’s metaverse experience “trash.” Moments later, I asked another avatar standing next to me what he thought of the experience. “This is dope,” responded the avatar named “TUtley.” “They need to get this for football.” The scenic views of Boston that appeared during game breaks were pretty impressive, too, and gave me a sense of being in the city where the game is played.