Tim MacMahon: Rockets C/PF Christian Wood’s ankle spr…

Tim MacMahon: Rockets C/PF Christian Wood’s ankle sprain is not considered serious, per sources. Status for Friday night’s game vs. Magic is TBD, but Wood isn’t expected to be out for an extended stretch.

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Alykhan Bijani: #Rockets Injury/Status: Dante Exum (NWT-R Calf Strain) Eric Gordon (Out-R Groin Strain) Danuel House (Out-R Knee Contusion) Rodions Kurucs (NWT–L Oblique Strain) Davis Nwaba (Questionable–R Wrist Strain) Victor Oladipo (Out–R Quad; Injury Maintenance) PJ Tucker (NWT) John Wall (Out–L Knee Contusion) Christian Wood (Out–R Ankle Sprain)
The Athletic understands that Houston wants to keep Wood out until after the break. The Rockets have erred on the side of caution with their free-agent splash, knowing Wood has had previous right ankle issues. They want to avoid a situation similar to what Warriors guard Stephen Curry endured early in his career, repeatedly injuring the same ankle to a point where it required surgery. Sources say Wood is in good spirits and moving in the right direction, walking without a limp and has been able to participate in some defensive sliding drills.
Wood will have an MRI on Friday to determine the severity of the injury he suffered when he gruesomely rolled his ankle during the third quarter of Thursday's 115-103 win over the Memphis Grizzlies, according to a source.
Adam Spolane: Rockets list Christian Wood as probable for tonight's game against the Blazers Portland has ruled out Zach Collins (ankle), Robert Covington (concussion), C.J. McCollum (foot), and Jusuf Nurkic (wrist). Rodney Hood and Derrick Jones Jr are probable
Adam Wexler: #Rockets Christian Wood was asked how scary his ankle was and how much does it hurt now. "It was very scary and I'm in a lot of pain." He added they told him not to come back in the game, but he knows his team needs him. Said it's swelling up now. @SportsTalk790
Storyline: Christian Wood Injury
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January 16, 2022 | 12:36 pm EST Update
How would you describe your game? Your dominance at the end of the Hapoel game as a 4 was impressive, your controlled the game. It was like that for 40 minutes. In this respect, it is possible to watch you at much higher levels. How do you see the possibility of returning to the NBA? Bonzie Colson: It has been my target since I came here. That’s my goal and also having played in Europe will help me when I get there. Playing in the NBA is easier than playing in Europe. There is more space. The three-second rule doesn’t exist here. There are many different rules. That’s why players are constantly changing places. Scoring is easier in the NBA. Because first of all, much more space is opening up. Also here are more systems. Every country has a system. A running game is being played in Spain. There is a game based on the physical struggle in Turkey. Every country has a different style of basketball. The NBA is opening up. There is a system, but you can’t be as aggressive as here. In Europe, you can be aggressive, push, hit, do a lot of things, but in the NBA you can’t do that. That’s why some of the players who play here look good there.
Traveling to Europe after your Bucks career… At what point did you decide it’s (the NBA) not working anymore? Bonzie Colson: I wouldn’t say it wasn’t working anymore. I was young, well I’m still young, so I decided I could do a year overseas and then come back (to the NBA). Scouts are still looking overseas, I could try something new. Then COVID hit, so I knew I was kind of in-between Europe and the NBA. So far has been a great opportunity. My goal is still to get back to the NBA for sure but I think it was great to do that and I’ve been doing well.
The National Basketball Association is offering virtual courtside seats on Meta’s $299 Oculus Quest 2 devices. The headsets were one of the most popular Christmas gifts in 2021, showing that people seem to be more willing than ever to give virtual reality a try. And businesses are trying to keep your eyeballs on their content by creating VR versions of their apps and games. The NBA experience is free and available on Meta’s Horizon Venues platform, which is a free software download for the Oculus headset. People appear as digital avatars, sort of like cartoon versions of their real selves, and watch an NBA game from a courtside perspective. It’s not Jack Nicholson’s Los Angeles Lakers seat at Crypto.com Arena or Spike Lee’s seat at Madison Square Garden, but it almost replicates the real thing.
As the Celtics were up 23-18 in the first quarter, one avatar approached me to ask for assistance on watching. I was confused at first, as my stream was fine, but it became clear the real person behind the avatar had a bad connection or was restricted due to local blackout rules. That prompted him to label the NBA’s metaverse experience “trash.” Moments later, I asked another avatar standing next to me what he thought of the experience. “This is dope,” responded the avatar named “TUtley.” “They need to get this for football.” The scenic views of Boston that appeared during game breaks were pretty impressive, too, and gave me a sense of being in the city where the game is played.