NBA rumors: Donovan Mitchell injury not serious

Utah Jazz star guard Donovan Mitchell exited Saturday’s 132-106 Game 3 loss to the LA Clippers because of pain in his right ankle, but the decision for him not to return was due to the lopsided score. “I feel like I was able to go back, but no need to risk it down 16, 18 at that point,” Mitchell said. “I’ll be fine.”

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Mitchell has averaged 32.3 points per game during the playoffs, including 30 point on 11-of-24 shooting in Game 3, despite dealing with persistent pain in the ankle. "It's when I land," Mitchell said. "It's been just trying to manage it. I don't really know what else to tell you; I don't want to say too much. It was just the landing, but I'm good. I'll be ready for Game 4."
Jared Weiss: Donovan Mitchell: “I’m good. That’s all I got for you. I’m good. The situation happened. I felt like I was good to come back, but no need to risk it down 18. Time to rest up and get ready for the next game.”
With the game slipping away from the Jazz, Mitchell had a conversation with coach Quin Snyder. He did not return to the game, although the Utah medical staff had cleared him to return. "He's in good shape," Snyder said. "He could have gone back in the game, but at that point, the lead had stretched. In fact, while we were talking, I think Kawhi hit a 3. That was my decision not to put him back in at that point. The game had gotten away from us at that point, but he's fine."
Andy Larsen: Mike Conley is listed as questionable for Game 3. (Donovan Mitchell isn’t on the report at all, for those concerned.)
Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell writhed in pain on the Vivint Arena court with 12 seconds remaining in Thursday's Game 2 against the LA Clippers, reaching toward the right ankle that he sprained several weeks ago. Mitchell got up after several seconds, shot his free throws and finished the 117-111 victory that gave the top-seeded Jazz a 2-0 lead in the Western Conference semifinal series. He limped off the floor after the win, but Mitchell insisted his health is no concern as the series heads to Los Angeles. "I got hit and it hurt, but I'm fine now," Mitchell said after his 37-point performance. "I walked in here. If you want me to sprint for you, I can. I'm good. You know, s--- happens. Thankfully, it wasn't bad. Move on and get ready for Game 3."
So, when he gingerly got up and was walking around, hopping up and down in the huddle in the timeout that followed the foul, there was a reasonable amount of concern. That concern mounted when he checked out of the game 11 seconds later and went straight to the locker room. But Mitchell said there’s nothing to be worried about. “It wasn’t anything bad,” he said after the Utah Jazz’s Game 2 series tying 141-129 win over the Memphis Grizzlies. “It wasn’t anything to be weary of. I feel good.”
The Utah Jazz decided to hold Donovan Mitchell out of Game 1 of their first round series against the Memphis Grizzlies, which became a controversial decision within the franchise. Mitchell publicly opposed the move and "I just think we're in a day and age that's different than back even five or six years ago where the training staffs carry a lot of weight," said Bobby Marks on The Hoop Collective Podcast. "They are the decision makers from an injury standpoint. And the front offices are basically at the mercy of your sports medicine, slash, training, slash strength and conditioning departments."
Brian Windhorst: Donovan's relationship with the organization was damaged this week. Is it damaged to a point where it can't be repaired? I'm not saying that. Is it something that they'll get past and he will just move on and have just a blip on the radar screen, maybe. Maybe they're in the Finals in two months, and who cares? Maybe they win the next four games, and it's totally forgotten. Okay. But right now, Donovan is hurting.
For most of Game 1, the Jazz played without passion or energy. They allowed Memphis to walk into Vivint Smart Home Arena and steal the series opener, 112-109. On Sunday night, Mitchell continued to post cryptic messages on Twitter and IG. Then came Monday morning, when an ESPN report about Mitchell’s frustrations only added to the intrigue. Heading into Wednesday night’s Game 2, what went on behind the scenes has come more into focus. Even if there is ambiguity elsewhere. Mitchell, as some stars around the league are known to do, has his own team of trainers who work in conjunction with the Jazz medical staff. According to sources, Mitchell’s team cleared him to play and gave him the go-ahead. Utah’s staff wanted him to sit out another game. The disconnect, quite clearly, did not sit well with Mitchell.
When it comes to how this went down, though, that distinction at the end of Mitchell’s comment is vital. Not only had Mitchell’s team indicated internally that he was healthy enough to play, but sources say he had been expecting to make his return from the ankle injury late in the regular season and was already frustrated with the unexpected delay. But the Jazz, who have the final say in whether a player is ready to play, didn’t agree that he should play and made the determination for a number of reasons.
According to a source with knowledge of the organization’s thinking, the top priority was Mitchell’s health and safety. The ankle sprain that Mitchell suffered in a game against Indiana on April 16 was clearly serious, and the notion of bringing him back when he was anything less than 100 percent caused concern on two fronts.
Ben Anderson: Donovan Mitchell on moving forward from the last 24 hours of drama with the Jazz locker room. "I want it to be known that we're moving forward as a group as a unit, because we got stuff to handle and as a group and team." #takenote | @kslsports
David Locke: Donovan Mitchell "The biggest thing for me was I felt like I should have played. It is no secret. We all know that. The frustration was it was unfair to my team. It eats me up. I barely slept it. That is where it hurt."
Eric Walden: I asked Quin if there was any kind of meeting between Donovan and the Jazz organization to dissect the communication breakdown pre-Game 1, he said the team always gets together post-game, but that Donovan would be motivated to get past "this controversy, if you can call it that."
Ben Anderson: When asked about who oversees Donovan Mitchell's health, Quin Snyder had to say this: "There's a collaboration in that regard." @KSLsports | #TakeNote
Andy Larsen: And a key Mitchell quote from Thurs: "I feel like it's kind of been progressing well for like the past two weeks, I want to say. I mean, you're gonna quote me on that, but I could be wrong. But I feel like that's when things started to go in the right way and projecting well."
Mitchell has been out since April 16, longer than was initially expected. After he progressed slowly in the early stages of recovery, Mitchell began to work with his personal training staff on the rehabilitation, sources said. There is hope that more rehab and testing can lead to Mitchell being cleared to play in Wednesday's Game 2, sources said, as the top-seeded Jazz look to even the series with the No. 8 seed Memphis Grizzlies
But in addition to managing the injury, some easing of frustrations may have to take place behind the scenes. That could include new part-owner Dwyane Wade, sources said. Wade has a good relationship with Mitchell and is with the team this week in Salt Lake City. "Sorry y'all... I wish I could say more.... I'll be out there soon!" Mitchell tweeted after the Jazz's 112-109 Game 1 loss.
Mitchell’s teammates noted after the game that they were confused by the decision for him not to play. “It was a big surprise. I just don’t know … I try to stay out of all this because it’s just going to give me a headache,” Rudy Gobert said after the Jazz’s 112-109 loss to the Grizzlies. “… When you wake up [from a nap], you get ready for a game, and you find out that your star player is not going to play, it throws you off a little bit.”
Most importantly, the Jazz for a large portion of Sunday night backed down to Memphis. They didn’t match the physicality. They didn’t play through the trash talk. That likely doesn’t happen if Mitchell, who gives as good as he gets, plays. The Grizzlies were able to turn Sunday night into a street fight, where every inch was up for grabs. Mitchell thrives on that kind of game, and with him in the lineup, it seems unlikely that the Grizzlies would have built a 17-point fourth-quarter lead. “It was definitely a game-changer for us, when a guy of his caliber is not able to play,” Conley said. “It was tough on our team, expecting a guy like that back. We’ve played this season with guys in and out of the lineup all year. So at the end of the day, the loss is no excuse.”
Tim MacMahon: Quin Snyder says Jazz medical staff met with Donovan Mitchell after shootaround and decided to hold him out of Game 1. He acknowledged that Mitchell, who declared himself “ready to go” when he talked to media post-shootaround, isn’t pleased with the decision.
Adrian Wojnarowski: Utah Jazz All-Star guard Donovan Mitchell isn’t expected to play vs. Memphis in Game 1 tonight, sources tell ESPN. Mitchell has been working toward his return from a sprained right ankle.
Eric Walden: Donovan Mitchell: "I feel good. Always gonna be soreness. I feel good, I’m ready to go tonight. No pain. I’m excited to get going." Declines to say "for game-planning purposes" if he's on a minutes restriction.
Ben Anderson: Donovan Mitchell on whether he thinks he'll be able to play his full minutes. "I haven't had that conversation as far as minutes. I would like to think so." @kslsports | #takenote
Eric Walden: Mike Conley, on Donovan Mitchell: "Something that Don’s thinking about, that we’re all thinking about, is him coming back & making sure everything’s laid out for him. … We’re gonna do everything we can during the week to make sure he’s ready to go. He’s gonna be ready as ever."
Eric Walden: Quin Snyder said that Donovan Mitchell is "coming along and working hard, doing everything he can to get back." Seemed to indicate he was not too worried about Donovan losing his timing, or the chemistry with teammates being rusty.
Eric Walden: Donovan Mitchell and Mike Conley remain OUT Friday vs. the Nuggets. Juwan Morgan is also OUT (right heel soreness). But Udoka Azubuike is PROBABLE after missing most of the season with a right ankle sprain.
Ben Anderson: Quin Snyder said he didn't have an update on Donovan Mitchell who was due to get re-evaluated tonight. But, he said he doesn't have an update because he's not an expert on injuries so he doesn't offer updates.
Ben Anderson: Donovan Mitchell remains out for tomorrow against the @Minnesota Timberwolves. The @Utah Jazz said last Saturday they’d reevaluate him in one week.
J. Michael Falgoust: Better look at that Donovan Mitchell injury. Right ankle #PacersJazz pic.twitter.com/hK6puHSTlC

http://twitter.com/ThisIsJMichael/status/1383157283400585216
Ben Anderson: Donovan Mitchell is very clearly hurt and being carried off the floor. Really scary moment here at the arena. Mitchell is moving really slowly, hard to tell exactly what happened. Doesn't seem to be putting weight on his right leg.
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July 27, 2021 | 2:28 pm EDT Update
So while Cunningham may share traits with Magic and Bird, the view of him as a can’t-miss prospect is much easier to process because of current-day players like Jokic—and, in particular, Luka Doncic. In broad strokes, Cunningham and Doncic may well be geminis of a very specific playmaking archetype. It’s rare to see perimeter players leverage their size, strength, and stride to create space in the way that both players seem innately aware and capable of. “As prospects, I do think Cade has a pretty similar baseline in terms of the vision and the way he sees the court, the way he processes how everyone is moving,” Zaucha said.
One watches Cunningham expecting a beeline to the right decision; one watches Doncic expecting the seas to magically part, showing another way. But the stylistic difference may not have much effect on substance. “I wonder if there really is a gap in their creativity—the way they manipulate defenders, especially—or if it’s some sort of aesthetic bias at play,” Zaucha said. “Because Luka loves to make those creative decisions, and then sell it with a behind-the-back pass or some wild delivery that the defense doesn’t expect. Whereas I think Cade—from a decision-making perspective, I think Cade solves problems in creative ways, he just doesn’t always make them look creative.”
Who are some of the NBA guys that you like to watch to help improve your game? Jeremiah Robinson-Earl: Two players I really like to watch are Draymond Green and Bam Adebayo. Draymond is a two-way player but defensive-minded and gets everything going for the team. He is very much a facilitator and he is able to find guys but still be aggressive to get his shot or to attack the goal. He is the glue to the team that is really important. I enjoy watching Draymond a lot because he’s just elite at facilitating, defense and being able to guard one through five. Bam, offensively, he is able to score at all three levels. He is able to have mismatches in the post and he is quick on his feet. He is able to hit tough turnaround shots. I like how he gets a lot of play out of the mid-post. I got a lot of that at Villanova this past season. I’m able to watch him get a lot of plays out of the midrange area with jab jumpers and rips to the goal for a dunk. He’s a playmaker, too, and he’s able to stretch to the three.
What about your game do you think will translate best to the next level in the pros? Jeremiah Robinson-Earl: I take a lot of pride in defensive and rebounding. I feel like, at every level, those are two things that can get you on the court. Coach Wright had a triangle for success and at the bottom of the triangle was defense and the next one was rebounding. If you can’t defend or rebound for Coach Wright, you’re not going to be in a position to be on the court. I know that’s gotten me to where I am today. I take a lot of pride in it and I want to keep doing what got me to this position today and keep being myself. I’m in a position to be drafted. Now is not the time to start doing things that I don’t normally do. I just need to keep focusing on doing what I do really well and knowing that what’s gotten me here has gotten me here. I’m going to keep excelling at that to the fullest. My weaknesses, I’ll get better at those on a year-to-year basis. I want to just keep gradually getting better and better.
Junior Robinson might be the only player in the history of college basketball to actively reduce his height in college, only to get taller as a pro. But the notion of players and coaches fudging their proportions is nothing new. Indeed, the basic assumption is that everyone is lying. This is college basketball, after all. Everyone’s looking for any tiny edge. Why would this be any different? So when I explain this idea to some coaches — that I researched the last 11 seasons of NBA Draft Combine height measurements, compared that to the prospects’ college figures and put it all in one big spreadsheet to see where the data would take us — they chuckled knowingly. “This is a great idea,” one coach said, “if you want to see how full of shit coaches really are.”
Storyline: Draft Combine
“It’s not always the kid,” Xavier coach Travis Steele said. “You’ll get a mentor or a parent in there saying, ‘Our Jimmy Joe is 6-foot-5!’ And you’re like, no, he’s 6-foot-3.’ We’ll get hit by parents who are sure their kid is taller than that. And it’s like, no, he’s really not.” There are other gambits, too. “You get kids who are 17 and they’re 6-foot-3, and they say, ‘Oh, (the doctor says) I’m going to be 6-foot-6,’” Maryland coach Mark Turgeon said. “You know, ‘My growth plates are wide open.’ When I first got into coaching 30 years ago, I believed those kids. None of them — OK, very rarely — do you get a David Robinson. It just doesn’t happen.”
Fred Hoiberg might have some, well, let’s call them unresolved issues with NBA Draft Combine measurements. “I got kind of screwed with mine,” he says. Here’s the story: At the 1995 combine, Hoiberg and his fellow hopefuls were separated into groups, rotating among four stations. One was for measurements. At Hoiberg’s station, there was a cord under the carpet. He noticed it and stood on it. “It was definitely to inflate my height,” he said, laughing. “I thought it was smart.” And it totally worked: Hoiberg measured 6 feet 5 3/4 without shoes. “I’m absolutely not that size,” he said. “This was a wise business decision.”