NBA rumors: Jose Juan Barea wants to return to Dallas as coach

Long-time Dallas Mavericks guard J.J. Barea – as former coach Rick Carlisle has often noted the last connection to the franchise’s 2011 NBA championship – is ready to move from a playing career overseas to a position on the Mavs’ coaching staff that Carlisle just left behind. “For sure,” Barea said on Friday when DallasBasketball.com asked him about the idea of coming back to Dallas to be a part of the next coaching staff here. “That’s what I want.”

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Barea has long been the subject of discussion in regard to joining the Mavs as a staffer or coach, in part because he was valuable in helping Luka Doncic make the off-the-court transition to America and the NBA. But the 36-year-old said on that retirement day, “I want to make sure everybody knows I want to play. Anything could happen this year, with the COVID, injuries. I might be back here in Dallas playing. I’ve seen it all in the NBA. I’ve seen some crazy stuff.”
Would you go after a chance to come back to Dallas in a new role? J.J: Barea: “No question. I’ve got a great relationship, as you know, with Mark [Cuban] and with everybody in the Mavericks, so they know. I’m going to meet with Mark here before I go to Puerto Rico for the summer. I want to stay in contact with the team for the next couple years, and then definitely, when a coaching job opens up, I want to keep getting my experience ready for coaching. I would love to work for the Mavericks and be in Dallas and be a part of the Mavericks forever.”
Barea remains determined to play in the NBA this season before retiring as a player and pursuing a career in coaching, sources said. The move is expected to be made official after Thursday's practice, granting Barea's request to be released sooner than later if it was a certainty that he wouldn't be on the roster after final preseason cuts.
“I still want to play basketball; I feel like I can still play basketball, ” said the Puerto Rican national team point guard. “I don't know exactly where. If it is going to be in Dallas, I know what they want is to move me to coach. If I want to play basketball, I have to go the other way,” he added.
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