NBA rumors: Kings keep Damian Jones, release Chris Silva

More on Chris Silva Free Agency

Nate Duncan: MIA looking at $26m in room with Iguodala extension. But could move Olynyk or stretch him (and possibly Chris Silva or Okpala) and get enough for Anthony Davis. If things go awry in LA, he's got another credible suitor this summer.
Barry Jackson: Per team source, Heat planning to switch Chris Silva's two-way contract into a 3-year standard deal on Tuesday. That would give Silva Bird rights after contracts ends and allow Miami to sign a new 2-way player by Wednesday's deadline to sign 2-way players.
Ira Winderman: Heat to sign Chris Silva to standard contract, with deal to be competed by Tuesday. The three-year deal likely will have option or trigger dates in third year.
Don’t be surprised to see the Heat convert Chris Silva’s two-way contract into a multi-year standard contract as early as Tuesday, the first day that can happen. The sense I get, from a league-employed source around the Heat, is that there’s strong sentiment toward converting Silva’s deal to a standard contract next week. Silva has only a handful of NBA days remaining on his two-way deal but hasn’t been sent to the G-League a single day this season. Because the Heat is operating under a hard salary cap, Tuesday would be the first day Miami could accommodate adding a player on a standard deal.
Miami could retain his Bird Rights longterm by giving him a deal for three years or longer, an approach Miami took when it signed Kendrick Nunn in April. The deadline to sign a new player to a two-way contract is Wednesday. So the Heat would need to convert Silva’s deal to a standard contract by Wednesday to add another two-way player to replace him.
The Heat has not decided whether to convert forward Chris Silva’s two-way contract into a standard deal on Jan. 14, the earliest date it can do so under the restrictions of a hard cap. The positive for doing that: It would allow the Heat to sign a different player to a two-way contract; the deadline for that is Jan. 15. (Point guard Daryl Macon holds the Heat’s other two-way contract.)
The reason to hold off on converting Silva: It would leave Miami with about $800,000 in wiggle room under its hard cap if it wants to make a trade before the Feb. 6 deadline. Under that scenario, the Heat could take back a player earning nearly $1 million more than the player it sends out. That option would evaporate if Silva’s two-way is converted to a standard deal on Jan. 14. Silva said the Heat hasn’t shared its intentions. “That’s my hope and dream, to be converted,” he said.
In true HEAT Culture fashion, your Miami HEAT have exercised the two-way player conversion option in the contract of undrafted forward Chris Silva. Silva, who was originally signed by the HEAT on July 11, appeared in five preseason games with Miami and averaged 5.2 points, 3.8 rebounds, 1.00 steals and 9.8 minutes while shooting 69.2 percent (9-of-13) from the field and 80 percent (8-of-10) from the foul line. Additionally, he appeared in six Summer League games (all starts) with Miami, and averaged 7.0 points, 5.7 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 18.3 minutes while shooting 56.5 percent from the field and 80 percent from the foul line.
Tim Reynolds: Heat signed Chris Silva to a two-way contract tonight. His exclusive reaction here:

http://twitter.com/ByTimReynolds/status/1185398092230807553
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September 25, 2021 | 12:12 pm EDT Update

Wizards would like to add a center

But Len and Lopez are gone, leaving Unseld with new arrival Montrezl Harrell, from the Lakers, and slightly-less-new arrival Gafford, who joined the Wizards from the Chicago Bulls at the trade deadline last season and made an immediate impact with his energy, athleticism and ability to slam lobs. Sheppard told The Washington Post in an interview this week that the Wizards would like to add a third center to shore up the spot with Bryant not expected back until winter, but for now, Gafford is Washington’s starter.
The Heat are among the least flexible teams in the league in terms of being able to make in-season moves. After rehauling their roster to sign Lowry and Tucker, extending Butler and signing many players to minimum contracts, they only have three players on the roster that can currently be traded. Theirtrade flexibility will open up in December and January once free agents that were signed become eligible to be traded, but they severely lack tradeable salaries. After their starters, most of whom seem very likely not to be moved, their next highest salary is Tyler Herro at $4.0 million. His salary combined with several of their minimum players will heavily limit the type of return they can get in a trade. They are also just $6.6 million below the hard cap, which is another factor that could hold them back from adding significant money to the payroll.