NBA rumors: Nikola Jokic feeling 'great'

Denver Nuggets All-Star center Nikola Jokic is feeling “great” and is expected to return to the United States in time to join the team flight to Orlando, Florida, according to coach Michael Malone. Jokic had his return to Denver delayed after testing positive for the coronavirus in Serbia, ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski and Brian Windhorst reported on June 23. “Nikola feels great,” Malone said in a Zoom call with reporters on Wednesday. “We are working on getting him back here. Next Tuesday we depart for Orlando; the hope and expectation is that Nikola Jokic will be with us on that plane. From everything that I have heard and talked to him, he feels great, he feels fine and is excited to get back.”

More on Coronavirus Infections

Spencer Dinwiddie: Just to be clear I haven’t opted out and want to play like I told @ShamsCharania . Unfortunately I have been one of the cases that has various symptoms.

http://twitter.com/wojespn/status/1277781101168209920
Jabari Parker just told the world he'd contracted coronavirus -- and less than 3 days later, the guy doesn't appear to be in isolation ... but rather, he's playing tennis in public. The Sacramento Kings star was spotted Saturday in Chicago's Longfellow Park, where he was rallying with a buddy on the other end of the net ... all smiles, and without a mask. Mind you, he'd just announced a few days earlier that he had test positive for COVID-19.
Jabari Parker just told the world he'd contracted coronavirus -- and less than 3 days later, the guy doesn't appear to be in isolation ... but rather, he's playing tennis in public. The Sacramento Kings star was spotted Saturday in Chicago's Longfellow Park, where he was rallying with a buddy on the other end of the net ... all smiles, and without a mask. Mind you, he'd just announced a few days earlier that he had test positive for COVID-19.
Rod Beard: NBPA executive director Michele Roberts on positive tests for 16 of 302 players tested: "I'm relieved the number was not higher." Silver: "I was relieved the number came in roughly where we expected it." He says none of the 16 was seriously ill.
Jason Anderson: If a star player tests positive: “We would continue. That team would be down a man. We would treat that positive test as we would an injury during the season, so it would not delay the continuation of the playoffs." -- NBA Commissioner Adam Silver
Kellan Olson: Devin Booker confirmed the report of a couple Suns players testing positive for COVID-19 on his stream (twitch.tv/dbook). He said they are getting tested every two days and for today's they came to his house.

https://twitter.com/KellanOlson/status/1276291934336585728
Brogdon, who spent a lot of time at St. Vincent Center rehabilitating from a thigh/hip muscle injury during the NBA's hiatus, also has been active in leading social protests after the death of George Floyd. Multiple league sources aren't clear on the league's directives, or if there even is one, regarding positive tests before players arrive in Orlando where they'll go into the "bubble" before resuming play.
Branislav Jokic talked to Nova.rs about his son, Nikola Jokic, testing positive for coronavirus. The Denver Nuggets player is fine and with his family, his father pointed out confirming that the 25-year-old Serbian center found out he was coronavirus positive last week and that he has not shown any symptoms. “We are all fine. Nikola is fine. It’s been a week,” he mentioned, “What he had is gone. He is not showing symptoms. He is with us and everything is fine.”
Nuggets franchise center Nikola Jokic has tested positive for the coronavirus and is currently back in Serbia, multiple league sources told The Denver Post. Citing medical privacy, the Nuggets declined comment.
All NBA players were to be back in market on June 22, and players who were overseas were to be back in market on June 15. Jokic was granted an exception by the NBA to stay in Sombor longer, however, during his recent trip, he tested positive.
Two Phoenix Suns players have tested positive for coronavirus, sources have informed The Arizona Republic. The positive tests led to Suns temporarily shutting down voluntary workouts at Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum, sources say. Mikal Bridges, Elie Okobo, Frank Kaminsky III, Dario Saric, Jevon Carter, Aron Baynes, Jalen Lecque and Cheick Diallo have participated in them based on a video the team posted earlier this month in their "Don't Sleep on Basketball" series. The players were having workouts at the arena Tuesday morning. There has been a notable increase in COVID-19 cases in Arizona.
The Republic reported Monday that according to state data, more than 1,000 new cases have been reported on each of the past 13 days, with more than 2,000 new cases reported on each of the past five days. Mandatory testing is scheduled to begin Tuesday for NBA players and essential staff members of each team. Phoenix's third-leading scorer, Kelly Oubre Jr., has opted not to play due to injury as he had knee surgery March 3. Players have until Wednesday to notify teams that they're not participating in the season resumption, according to The Athletic.
Adrian Wojnarowski: As coronavirus testing for players heading to Orlando starts today, teams are bracing for significant numbers of positive tests. One Western Conference playoff team had four positives in past few weeks, per sources. Full training camps start on July 11 at Disney. It's a bigger concern for non-guaranteed playoff teams to lose players to extended quarantine before Orlando. Playoff teams worried less about needing key players for seeding games in August have more time to get players back to shape. All are worried about soft-tissue injuries.
Adrian Wojnarowski: All of this, of course, is hoping that those players testing positive experience little, if no, symptoms. While statistics are on the side of healthy, young NBA players not becoming seriously ill because of the coronavirus, there are no guarantees.
Adrian Wojnarowski: One change for use to replacement players in Orlando, per league memo to teams: Replacing a player with Covid-19 must occur no later than 7 days following confirmed positive player resumes training.
Denver Nuggets head coach Michael Malone told CBS4’s Xfinity Monday Live he tested positive for COVID-19. Malone told CBS4’s Michael Spencer he didn’t realize he had the coronavirus until well after the fact.
So Malone wasn’t the only Nugget to test positive. “It’s interesting on some people on our team, traveling party and staff got it,” said the 48-year old head coach. “I hope going to Orlando (for the resumption of the NBA season) will be a safe environment and we can limit the amount of people who get it. I like to say that I got coronavirus and I kicked its butt.”
Nuggets all-star center Nikola Jokic may have been exposed to someone who tested positive for coronavirus during a recent visit to his native Serbia. Pictures show Jokic in close proximity to Nikola Jankovic, a center for KK Partizan, during last Thursday’s exhibition game honoring coach Dejan Milojevic in Belgrade. On Monday, Jankovic’s professional team announced he had tested positive for the virus. A picture in the following tweet shows Jankovic “Janker” standing to Jokic’s right.
Michele Roberts told the Globe the NBPA is prepared for several players to test positive just because of the contagiousness of the virus, regardless of the league’s safety measures and social distancing. “Of course [the players] understand it could be a positive test and they want to know what the protocol is,” Roberts said this past week. “No one is saying, ‘Suppose a player tests positive?’ We’re beyond that. The question now is, ‘When a player tests positive, what are we going to do?’ ”
“That’s the only realistic mind-set you can have going into this. A player is going to test positive,” Roberts said. “It’s not any more of this ‘if’, it’s ‘when’ and what can I do to mitigate against the ‘when.’ When it happens, if I’m not successful, what treatment is available to me, what are my chances of being really, really sick, and how are you detecting the presence of an infection? Honestly, I don’t think this is any different than what any American has to come to grips with.”
Roberts said no player is being mandated to play and there will be no repercussions — besides financially — if a player decides to sit out the season. “I don’t believe any player would say this was forced upon them, it’s not,” she said. “Not a single player has to play. This is not involuntary servitude. I don’t have to work. They don’t have to work. But it’s of course a mitigation of risk with the players. On this health and safety protocol, I’m satisfied that it can’t be any better than this. But I’m candid that it’s not bulletproof.”
Several other aspects of the NBA’s return were discussed, which The Athletic learned via sources: – A plan to play 2-to-3 exhibition games before regular season – 1,600 maximum people on campus – Coronavirus testing every day; minimum seven days of quarantine for a player who tests positive – Players and family must stay inside the bubble; families can enter after the first round – If a player contracts the virus, the NBA says they plan to continue playing
Tania Ganguli: Silver says that based on conversations with health officials he does not believe the league would need to shut down if a player tests positive for Covid-19. They'll isolate him, trace his contacts and continue testing daily and believe that will be enough to contain it.
Would you be okay playing with or against a guy that you knew tested positive for COVID19?" "Curry: Oh that'd be tough. I mean, that's one of the things that you're having to address because that is a real scenario. If you try to play and there is no vaccine, there's no way to really guarantee nobody's going to get it. I think if you are at a place where everybody says yeah we're ready to play and then they know what they're committing to. And if not, it doesn't make sense, then you won't see a ball bounce."
Silver told those on the call that if a positive test would "shut us down, we probably shouldn't go down this path." The question remains: How many positive tests would be too many, and those are among the questions that the NBA, NBPA and medical experts have to come to terms with in the coming weeks before the league and union can greenlight a resumption of play.
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver was on a conference call with representatives of the league players’ association, discussing restarting the season. His stance about one issue was clear. If the NBA was going to resume play, it would commit to staying on course even in the face of a positive COVID-19 test, or, depending on the circumstances, even a few of them. He didn’t know at the time that the leader of another major sports enterprise was already dealing with similar circumstances.
A UFC fighter and two of his cornermen had tested positive ahead of Saturday’s pay-per-view event in Jacksonville. Hours later, when the situation became known publicly, many people assumed the show would not go on. After all, the NBA immediately shut down in March when Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert became the first of its players to test positive. A zero-tolerance policy is understandable, then and now, but what Silver and UFC President Dana White came to realize is there is also likely no realistic pathway for the return of major sports competition if that is the benchmark.
Even if leagues create a “bubble,” as the UFC did this week in Jacksonville when it took over a hotel, tested everyone upon check-in and held all events at an adjacent arena, there is a good chance someone will test positive, especially when some people are asymptomatic, as Ronaldo “Jacre” Souza and his cornermen were. Without a vaccine, the question isn’t if someone will test positive, it’s what is the plan when someone does.
Myles Turner’s father, David, contracted COVID-19 soon after the league suspended operations after the Pacers’ March 10 home game. David Turner fell ill about a week before his son’s 24th birthday — March 24 — but was fortunate to avoid the fate of so many others who weren’t treated or tested immediately. In fact, his first visit to the hospital led to an incorrect H1N1 diagnosis, a flu strain.
“It was a rough patch for a couple weeks,” Turner said. “They said they think he actually contracted it in Indiana. He caught it early before all the frenzy started to happen. Once he got it, he had a whole bunch of symptoms, fever, chills, pneumonia. Had to get him to the hospital. They said he had the H1N1, sent him back home, then he started feeling worse, they sent him to a different hospital, they tested him right away. They said he had corona.”
That just isn’t likely to be in 2019-20, at least according to Kleiman. He also addressed Durant’s bout with and recovery from coronavirus. The Nets had announced that four players had tested positive. Durant was among the quartet, but Kleiman said the forward was asymptomatic at the time and perfectly recovered now. “He was fortunate that he was asymptomatic throughout, and is now clear and free of it,” said Kleiman. “But obviously quarantined like the rest of us.”
Jason Collins had dealt with these kind of symptoms. He understood them. There was a headache, and sharp body pains. It was manageable. But then Day 9 arrived, and suddenly Collins was floored by the coronavirus.
Collins feared a heart attack. The tightness in his chest was overwhelming. He checked into the hospital in Day 10 since the onset of symptoms, driven to the emergency room by this unnerving discomfort. Collins was assured by doctors that his heart wasn’t failing. “They said when the virus is peaking, this is what happens,” Collins said.
Jazz stars Rudy Gobert and Donovan Mitchell were the first NBA players test positive for coronavirus. From there, multiple potential connection points emerged. Pistons big Christian Wood – who faced Utah in Detroit a few days prior – was diagnosed with coronavirus and has since recovered. A cameraperson who worked that game, including shooting inside the Jazz locker room, was also diagnosed with coronavirus and even put into a medically reduced coma.
In an interview with Italy's Corriere della Sera (via Sportando), San Antonio Spurs' Marco Belinelli expressed his thoughts on Gobert's behavior [related to coronavirus] saying what he did was "terrible." "Terrible. I prefer not to express myself because I don't want to say things that then seem offensive or too serious, but what he did was yes, terrible," Belinelli said.
NBA players – generally young and healthy – mostly face reduced risk (not no risk) of developing serious symptoms due to coronavirus. But family and friends are still susceptible. Pacers center Myles Turner on C.J. McCollum‘s podcast: “My dad actually got it. He made a full recovery. But just seeing him kind of go through it was huge, because you see all the memes, and it’s funny and stuff on Twitter until something actually happens to you. And seeing my dad get it, he was super weak. He could barely talk.”
Myles Turner: “My dad has underlying conditions as well. He’s 55, 56 years old. So, he has underlying conditions. And he was in the hospital for damn near a week, maybe six or seven days. I think that’s when I kind of started taking it more serious. Like, man, this can really happen to anybody. We don’t know much about it. And that’s when I started doing more research on it, keeping up on it every day to see what I can do to keep myself safe, my sister safe, keep my family safe. Blessed as it may be, he made a full recovery.”
Sydney Wiese: Got retested for COVID-19 and my results came back negative. Thank you to everyone who has prayed and checked in! May we continue to do our part, think of others, and stay at home Red heart #CallYourGrandparents
Waiters remained in Los Angeles to work out after the suspension, though those activities were soon banned. Then Waiters, like the rest of his teammates, was tested for the coronavirus in mid-March, a process he described as “terrible.” “They stick a Q-tip into your nose, it touches the front of your brain,” Waiters describes. “You start coughing and everything, it was the worst.”
They had about four minutes. The phone call, from an official with the Oklahoma State Department of Health to a member of the Utah Jazz, was unambiguous: Rudy Gobert, the Jazz’s All-Star center, had tested positive for the coronavirus, the rapidly-spreading precursor to the condition known as COVID-19. An extremely contagious virus for which there is no vaccine, COVID-19 had already killed thousands of people in China, and was quickly working its way through Italy, where it would kill thousands more. Yet on March 11, the United States was, relatively speaking, still open for business.
As player introductions for the home team concluded, an official of the Jazz called an official of the Thunder. The two had been in regular contact for the last 24 hours, since Gobert had started showing signs of fever that weren’t dissipating. Now, there was no doubt. Even though Gobert had been kept out of Chesapeake as a precaution that night, and was still at the team’s hotel in town, he’d obviously been in close contact with several of his Jazz teammates – who were now taking the floor, along with the Thunder. There was no more time.
Fortunately, an OKC official was close enough to Donnie Strack, the Thunder’s Vice President of Human and Player Performance, to get his attention. Get the refs, Strack was told. Tell them to stop the tipoff. As Strack ran onto the court, Rob Hennigan, OKC’s VP of Insight and Foresight, started corralling the Thunder’s players and coaches. He then joined the huddle near midcourt with Strack and the referees – crew chief Pat Fraher, Mark Lindsay and Ben Taylor. The officials soon called over the respective head coaches, Quin Snyder and Billy Donovan. Seconds later, they contacted the NBA, through its Digital Operations Center, where the league monitors every game played. Usually, the biggest issue on a given night at the DOC is to help referees determine whether or not to instant replay. This was different.
“We weren’t the chief health office that night; the state and OSDH was,” Holt said. “We were trying to figure out what to do with the 21c hotel, which is where Rudy Gobert was sitting, in his room … people were coming to the lobby asking, ‘Is Rudy Gobert at this hotel?’ “I’ve got calls rolling in from the NBA, from Sam Presti. They were trying to figure out a variety of issues, including where would the Jazz sleep tonight if they couldn’t get out? Because they needed about 50 rooms, and they had checked out already … And also finding a hotel who could take in people that might have COVID-19.”
With the coronavirus pandemic gripping much of society and four Nets having tested positive for COVID-19, Joe Harris reassured fans he is healthy — albeit stuck in quarantine and having to find creative ways to do what he’s best known for: shoot the rock. “Yeah, everybody is good health-wise thankfully,” Harris said Monday in an Instagram Live session on the NBA account. “Obviously crazy times for everybody, but definitely fortunate on my side of things that everything is going well.”
Garrett Temple spends his quarantine time with his fiancée, Miss USA 2017 Kara McCullough, and their chocolate lab. He also is using the unexpected down time to study for the LSAT law school admission exam and would like to be an NBA general manager or perhaps a team owner. “This isn’t the New York people have seen,” Temple said. “No people or cars. My fiancée and I are fine. I did not test positive (for COVID-19) but some of my teammates did. We quarantined and now we’re staying at home like we’re supposed to. Just us and our dog.”
Kyle Guy: Covid-19 took my grandpa last night. Mortality is a tough pill to swallow. You used to live down the street, now you’re with us everyday Red heart I beg you, don’t let this be your wake up call. Take this seriously & stay safe 🙏🏼
Maury was taken to the University of Tennessee Medical Center on Monday, March 23, and was put on a ventilator the next day after being diagnosed with coronavirus. He wasn’t able to speak. His wife, Susan, who was quarantined at home, had her only communication via ear buds through which she would talk to him for hours. “He says he didn’t hear me, which is probably good so he can’t uphold all of the promises I made to him,” she said.
Hanks is set to begin physical therapy, and the doctors are hopeful that he will go home sometime in the coming days, maybe as soon as this weekend. And he’ll leave the hospital with a completely different outlook on life. “There will always be another game, always be another practice to see,” he said. “I won’t take things for granted anymore. Anyone who tells you differently hasn’t been through something like this.”
Jamie Goldberg: Damian Lillard said he has not been tested for COVID-19. He said he has not experienced any symptoms that would warrant him being tested, but he is following NBA protocol by checking his temperature daily and staying home #RipCity
Jayson Tatum is luckier than most people nowadays. When he was potentially exposed to COVID-19, the Boston Celtics found their way to test him and the rest of the team. Since returning from Milwaukee, where the team was scheduled to face the Bucks when the NBA shut down, Tatum has been holed up in his house. “It was scary when (Marcus) Smart found out that he had it and he didn’t have any symptoms,” Smart told Jeff Goodman on the latest episode of the Good N’ Plenty podcast. “So it was like ‘wow, any of us could have it at this point.’”
J.B. Bickerstaff hasn’t been tested for coronavirus. No one in the Cavaliers organization has. He said all of his players are healthy and asymptomatic. “I don’t feel any effects. My kids are good. My wife is good. I feel like the people who need the test should use the test and they should be the ones getting tested,” Bickerstaff said. “At this point, I’m comfortable with where we are and the steps that we have taken to protect ourselves."
James Edwards III: Per source, the #Pistons have offered their new performance center (practice gym, team headquarters) to health officials for "whatever best use is." That could be for COVID-19 testing, temporary hospital for patients overflowing from Henry Ford or a sleep facility for med staff.
The longtime NBA announcer and analyst joined her ESPN colleague Adrian Wojnarowski on his podcast, The Woj Pod, to share her journey, from symptoms to recovery, as the new coronavirus pandemic continues to spread across the United States and the rest of the world. “I cannot begin to express to you the feeling of gratitude that I have for health,” she told Wojnarowski. “And I just want people to know, it’s important to social distance and to continue to function with all good practices of hand washing, wiping down surfaces, whatever your trusted medical professionals are telling you, please, please follow those.”
“That really was my primary symptom throughout, this extraordinary fatigue,” Burke said on The Woj Pod. “You know, I took an Aspirin that day, I felt better, I went about the normal business of trying to prep for the game, do the game.”
“You’re aware of the shortage of tests, and you have that moral dilemma as a person,” she said. “[But] obviously our job requirement is such that we are on airplanes where we hear people cough and sneeze. We are in incredibly close proximity. The month prior to that game on March 11 happened to be a particularly hectic one for me travel-wise. “I was not spending very much time in my apartment here in the Philly area. So, I just thought, I started to believe, even though my symptoms did not seem to line up with the typical symptoms, I believed, given the nature of my profession, the number of people I encounter, that I did in fact have exposure to the virus.”

https://twitter.com/BleacherReport/status/1243610777040424964
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August 14, 2020 | 1:12 am EDT Update
The final buzzer sounded Thursday night with the Utah Jazz topping San Antonio 118-112, officially eliminating the Spurs from contention for a Western Conference play-in spot and ending their record-tying run of 22 consecutive postseason appearances. “It means a lot to a lot of people probably, but I don’t dwell on the past,” said legendary Spurs coach Gregg Popovich, who captured five NBA titles during that span. “That stuff’s totally [not] important; what’s important is the moment you do what you’ve got to do then you move on, but looking at the past doesn’t do much good. Any success we’ve had has been because we’ve had some great players.”
Though the NBA saved itself from losing more than $1 billion by not canceling its season, the league will still suffer substantial revenue losses due to Covid-19. That will likely affect Oladipo’s next contract, as the players will see a drop in income available. Oladipo said his current concern is helping the Pacers in the NBA bubble and “continuing to strengthen my knee.” “I’m just focused on doing what I can to help my team the best way I can,” he said. “One day, it will all click again, and then I can worry about those other things when the time comes.”
Storyline: Victor Oladipo Free Agency
So when the Kings’ season ended Thursday, and Hield was asked if he’s comfortable with his role off the bench in Sacramento heading into next season, his answer raised some eyebrows. Including, I’d imagine, some in Philadelphia. Here’s what Hield had to say: [Hield] provided a series of short answers during a Zoom session with reporters and offered a cryptic response when asked if he could be content with his role going into next season. “Y’all know me,” Hield said. “Y’all know how I talk. Y’all know how I feel. Y’all can read me well, so I’ll let y’all answer that yourselves.”
Justin Kubatko: Most points scored by a player over the final three games of a regular season: 154 – Damian Lillard, 2019-20 128 – Dominique Wilkins, 1985-86 128 – Michael Jordan, 1986-87 128 – Kobe Bryant, 2005-06 127 – David Thompson, 1977-78 127 – Russell Westbrook, 2014-15
For New Orleans Pelicans rookie Zion Williamson, it’s time to turn the page to next season and focus on getting better — with his game and his body. “I’ll talk to my coaches and see what I need to do better from their point of view,” Williamson said Thursday morning. “Talk to my player development coaches as well, see what I need to do better from their point of view. Just work on every part of my game and work on getting my body where it needs to be.”
Given how fluid this draft is, the Warriors could draft the same player at No. 5 that they’d eye with the No. 2 pick. According to league sources, Israeli small forward Deni Avdija, Iowa State point guard Tyrese Haliburton, Florida State shooting guard Devin Vassell and Auburn small forward Isaac Okoro are among the players Golden State would consider in that range.
With so much time spent off the court since his injury in January 2019, Oladipo stayed productive in other ways, including through business. Like numerous athletes, Oladipo has taken an interest in tech investing, and is particularly excited about his stake in a sports marketing company called Genies, which creates and licenses avatars of celebrities, mostly on social media.
The first game-worn jerseys from the NBA’s restart in Orlando have hit the auction block. NBA Auctions has launched a group of 58 jerseys from the league’s first few games in the “bubble” including those donned by LeBron James, Anthony Davis and Zion Williamson. Jerseys worn by members of the Lakers, Pelicans, Spurs and Nets are the first to reach the auction block from games played after the league stopped play in March due to COVID-19. Most of the jerseys are game-worn while a few were made for players who didn’t see action.
Google may finally end the internet tradition of traffic-grabbing how-to-watch posts with a new search feature that will display local TV and streaming options for NBA and MLB games when you search phrases like “how to watch the Lakers games.” The new feature is rolling out in the US today, and it can incorporate your location data to help you figure out which specific local channel is airing the game you want to watch. The new TV options will also appear on Google’s existing sport game search widgets alongside things like the box score or time remaining in the game.

Toronto Raptors assistant coach Adrian Griffin on Thursday denied a series of domestic violence accusations made by his ex-wife in a social media post. In a message posted to Twitter, Audrey Griffin said Adrian Griffin had repeatedly abused her, including choking her, throwing her into a wall with enough force to leave a hole and dragging her across a lawn while she was pregnant. “This morning, accusations were made against me on social media by my former wife that I vehemently deny,” Adrian Griffin said in a statement released by the Raptors. “We are involved in a longstanding legal dispute over alimony and child support arrangements. I am disappointed to have to address false accusations in this way, and I apologize for any distraction this has potentially caused for our team at this important time.”
The Raptors also issued a separate statement on the matter. “When we saw these allegations this morning, we were dismayed — Adrian is a valuable member of our team,” the team said in the statement. “Our leadership immediately spoke with him, and he flatly denied the allegations in the posts. We will support the process as he and his former partner settle these matters.” Audrey Griffin had previously made similar allegations of abuse on social media. On Thursday, she wrote in part, “How can someone do ALL of this and get away with it. … I will tell you how… just be in the NBA and win a game in the bubble. Cinderfella. That’s how. Simple.”
August 13, 2020 | 9:14 pm EDT Update
August 13, 2020 | 8:05 pm EDT Update
August 13, 2020 | 7:49 pm EDT Update
“Dodger Stadium is part of the fabric of Los Angeles, and we’re proud to continue to partner with the County to make the property available for the benefit of the community at large,” Dodgers president and CEO Stan Kasten said in a news release. “Voting is all of our civic duty, and we’re excited to work with More than a Vote to do anything we can to help get out the vote by making this process as easy, accessible and safe for all Angelenos.”
August 13, 2020 | 7:18 pm EDT Update
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