NBA rumors: Russell Westbrook tests positive for COVID-19

2 years ago via ESPN
Houston Rockets star Russell Westbrook says he has tested positive for coronavirus. Westbrook tweeted Monday that he tested positive before his Rockets teammates were scheduled to travel to Walt Disney World for the resumption of the NBA season Westbrook tweeted he is “currently feeling well, quarantined, and looking forward to rejoining my teammates when I am cleared.”

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The Orlando Magic said Tuesday that one of their players recently tested positive for the coronavirus. Team president Jeff Weltman declined to identify the player to reporters but said the individual is following protocols and hopes to join the team soon.
In a virtual interview with Fortune Brainstorm Health, Silver said the NBA expects more positive coronavirus cases to pop up as teams arrive to the NBA campus at Walt Disney World resort this week. But once teams arrive, all personnel will be tested and must quarantine for at least two days. "We won't be surprised when they first come down to Orlando if we have some additional players test positive," Silver told Fortune Brainstorm Health. "What would be most concerning is once players enter this campus and then go through our quarantine period, then if they were to test positive or if we were to have any positive tests, we would know we would have an issue." "... We would know that there's in essence a hole in our bubble or that our quarantine or our campus is not working in some way," Silver added later. "So that would be very concerning."
Silver said the NBA's campus with daily testing and guidance from medical experts is "as protected as possible from the environment around us." "So on paper, and dealing with our experts, this should work," Silver said. "But we shall see. I'm confident based on the positive cases we are seeing from our players and the general public around the country that it will be safer on this campus than off this campus in part because we are going to be doing daily testing. But again this virus has humbled many so I am not going to express any higher level of confidence than we are following the protocols and we hope it works as we designed it."
Silver reiterated that the league likely will not be forced to shut down again due to one potential positive coronavirus test inside campus. However, a spread could bring the NBA to a halt again. "I think we do have the ability to trace, of course to try to understand where that positive case came from," Silver said of any positive cases inside the Walt Disney World campus. "We can actually analyze the virus itself and try to track whether if there is more than one case, if it's in essence the same virus and same genetic variation of the virus that is passed from one player to another or two people have gotten it on the campus independently. So those are all things that we are looking at."
But when their strained relationship following the positive tests lingered in public view for months, it increased the intensity of their issues and put a spotlight on an already-tense dynamic. It's a spotlight that was created because, according to sources, Mitchell blamed Gobert for infecting him with COVID-19.
(The Bucks) had to shut down their facility over the weekend because of positive test. How much of a concern is that for the team that is right now the favor to win at all? Malika Andrews: I checked in with a source with the Bucks and they just told me that they are mostly bummed about the timing. They are not expected to open the facility again before they traveled to Orlando this week. And for a lot of guys, these last two weeks they've actually been able to be inside the practice facility is the first time they've been able to touch a basketball in a while.

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Spencer Dinwiddie: Protocol only calls for 7 days and negative tests not the 14 day standard. Yep, the plan would be to fly to Orlando after workout. For players that show up late, it might make it difficult to resume season at all due to more rigorous testing requirements.

http://twitter.com/GregLogan1/status/1279944821831020544
The WNBA announced Monday that seven of 137 (5.1%) tested players were positive for COVID-19, and that 11 of the league's 12 teams will report to IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. for its season start-up by the end of the day. The one exception in that travel schedule is the Indiana Fever. After sustaining two positive tests in their organization, the Fever's travel will be delayed at least five days "in an abundance of caution due to the CDC’s close contact self-quarantine requirements," according to a statement from the league.
Spencer Dinwiddie: Protocol only calls for 7 days and negative tests not the 14 day standard. Yep, the plan would be to fly to Orlando after workout. For players that show up late, it might make it difficult to resume season at all due to more rigorous testing requirements.

http://twitter.com/GregLogan1/status/1279944821831020544
The WNBA announced Monday that seven of 137 (5.1%) tested players were positive for COVID-19, and that 11 of the league's 12 teams will report to IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. for its season start-up by the end of the day. The one exception in that travel schedule is the Indiana Fever. After sustaining two positive tests in their organization, the Fever's travel will be delayed at least five days "in an abundance of caution due to the CDC’s close contact self-quarantine requirements," according to a statement from the league.
Kurt Helin: The WNBA announces 7 players out of 137 tested were positive for the coronavirus (5.1%). The league is heading to Florida today to start preparations for its season at the IMG Academy.
Sam Amick: Source tells @TheAthletic the Kings have shut down their practice facility after receiving a positive coronavirus test within the team’s traveling party on Sunday. The facility is not expected to reopen before the team departs for Orlando on Wednesday.
James Ham: Confirming that the Sacramento Kings have shut down their practice facility after a positive test within their traveling party. No word yet on whether it was player, staff or coach. @sam_amick first with the news
Marc Stein: Sacramento would be the seventh team of the 22 bound for Walt Disney World publicly known to take this measure at some point over the past two weeks since players were asked to be back in their home markets on June 22: Kings, Bucks, Heat, Clippers, Nuggets, Suns and Nets
Maccabi Tel Aviv announced that Tyler Dorsey has been quarantined after a verified case of COVID-19 was discovered in his building. The Israeli League season resumed on June 21 and Maccabi has played four games so far in the Winner Stage Group, winning three of them and improving to a 22-3 overall record.
Barry Jackson: A third Heat player has tested positive for COVID-19, according to a source. The Miami Herald is not reporting the names of the two players who tested positive in the past few days; both are rotation players.
While the team hasn’t disclosed which players tested positive, sources say Williamson wasn’t one of them. The protocol alone makes that much obvious, as players who test positive have to self isolate for 14 days and can’t take part in physical activity or be at the team’s facility during that time.
While the team hasn’t disclosed which players tested positive, sources say Williamson wasn’t one of them. The protocol alone makes that much obvious, as players who test positive have to self isolate for 14 days and can’t take part in physical activity or be at the team’s facility during that time.
Marks confirmed that Spencer Dinwiddie may not be playing in Orlando because he recently tested positive for coronavirus. Dinwiddie, who remains on the Nets’ 36-person travel list, told The Athletic that he is not sure if he will join the team when the season resumes later this month. “I would hope these guys decide to do what's best for them and for their health and family first and foremost. If they decide to go to Orlando, we know we'll be taking best care possible of them,” Marks said. “But at the end of the day it goes back to what I said before: Everybody has a different set of circumstances in their life that they're dealing with whether that's family issues or the health and wellness of themselves. And we need to support those guys whatever decision that they make.”

https://twitter.com/SerenaWinters/status/1278729904494981123
Denver Nuggets All-Star center Nikola Jokic is feeling "great" and is expected to return to the United States in time to join the team flight to Orlando, Florida, according to coach Michael Malone. Jokic had his return to Denver delayed after testing positive for the coronavirus in Serbia, ESPN's Adrian Wojnarowski and Brian Windhorst reported on June 23. "Nikola feels great," Malone said in a Zoom call with reporters on Wednesday. "We are working on getting him back here. Next Tuesday we depart for Orlando; the hope and expectation is that Nikola Jokic will be with us on that plane. From everything that I have heard and talked to him, he feels great, he feels fine and is excited to get back."
Spencer Dinwiddie: Just to be clear I haven’t opted out and want to play like I told @ShamsCharania . Unfortunately I have been one of the cases that has various symptoms.

http://twitter.com/wojespn/status/1277781101168209920
Jabari Parker just told the world he'd contracted coronavirus -- and less than 3 days later, the guy doesn't appear to be in isolation ... but rather, he's playing tennis in public. The Sacramento Kings star was spotted Saturday in Chicago's Longfellow Park, where he was rallying with a buddy on the other end of the net ... all smiles, and without a mask. Mind you, he'd just announced a few days earlier that he had test positive for COVID-19.
Jabari Parker just told the world he'd contracted coronavirus -- and less than 3 days later, the guy doesn't appear to be in isolation ... but rather, he's playing tennis in public. The Sacramento Kings star was spotted Saturday in Chicago's Longfellow Park, where he was rallying with a buddy on the other end of the net ... all smiles, and without a mask. Mind you, he'd just announced a few days earlier that he had test positive for COVID-19.
Rod Beard: NBPA executive director Michele Roberts on positive tests for 16 of 302 players tested: "I'm relieved the number was not higher." Silver: "I was relieved the number came in roughly where we expected it." He says none of the 16 was seriously ill.
Jason Anderson: If a star player tests positive: “We would continue. That team would be down a man. We would treat that positive test as we would an injury during the season, so it would not delay the continuation of the playoffs." -- NBA Commissioner Adam Silver
Kellan Olson: Devin Booker confirmed the report of a couple Suns players testing positive for COVID-19 on his stream (twitch.tv/dbook). He said they are getting tested every two days and for today's they came to his house.

https://twitter.com/KellanOlson/status/1276291934336585728
Brogdon, who spent a lot of time at St. Vincent Center rehabilitating from a thigh/hip muscle injury during the NBA's hiatus, also has been active in leading social protests after the death of George Floyd. Multiple league sources aren't clear on the league's directives, or if there even is one, regarding positive tests before players arrive in Orlando where they'll go into the "bubble" before resuming play.
Branislav Jokic talked to Nova.rs about his son, Nikola Jokic, testing positive for coronavirus. The Denver Nuggets player is fine and with his family, his father pointed out confirming that the 25-year-old Serbian center found out he was coronavirus positive last week and that he has not shown any symptoms. “We are all fine. Nikola is fine. It’s been a week,” he mentioned, “What he had is gone. He is not showing symptoms. He is with us and everything is fine.”
Nuggets franchise center Nikola Jokic has tested positive for the coronavirus and is currently back in Serbia, multiple league sources told The Denver Post. Citing medical privacy, the Nuggets declined comment.
All NBA players were to be back in market on June 22, and players who were overseas were to be back in market on June 15. Jokic was granted an exception by the NBA to stay in Sombor longer, however, during his recent trip, he tested positive.
Two Phoenix Suns players have tested positive for coronavirus, sources have informed The Arizona Republic. The positive tests led to Suns temporarily shutting down voluntary workouts at Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum, sources say. Mikal Bridges, Elie Okobo, Frank Kaminsky III, Dario Saric, Jevon Carter, Aron Baynes, Jalen Lecque and Cheick Diallo have participated in them based on a video the team posted earlier this month in their "Don't Sleep on Basketball" series. The players were having workouts at the arena Tuesday morning. There has been a notable increase in COVID-19 cases in Arizona.
The Republic reported Monday that according to state data, more than 1,000 new cases have been reported on each of the past 13 days, with more than 2,000 new cases reported on each of the past five days. Mandatory testing is scheduled to begin Tuesday for NBA players and essential staff members of each team. Phoenix's third-leading scorer, Kelly Oubre Jr., has opted not to play due to injury as he had knee surgery March 3. Players have until Wednesday to notify teams that they're not participating in the season resumption, according to The Athletic.
Adrian Wojnarowski: As coronavirus testing for players heading to Orlando starts today, teams are bracing for significant numbers of positive tests. One Western Conference playoff team had four positives in past few weeks, per sources. Full training camps start on July 11 at Disney. It's a bigger concern for non-guaranteed playoff teams to lose players to extended quarantine before Orlando. Playoff teams worried less about needing key players for seeding games in August have more time to get players back to shape. All are worried about soft-tissue injuries.
Adrian Wojnarowski: All of this, of course, is hoping that those players testing positive experience little, if no, symptoms. While statistics are on the side of healthy, young NBA players not becoming seriously ill because of the coronavirus, there are no guarantees.
Adrian Wojnarowski: One change for use to replacement players in Orlando, per league memo to teams: Replacing a player with Covid-19 must occur no later than 7 days following confirmed positive player resumes training.
Denver Nuggets head coach Michael Malone told CBS4’s Xfinity Monday Live he tested positive for COVID-19. Malone told CBS4’s Michael Spencer he didn’t realize he had the coronavirus until well after the fact.
So Malone wasn’t the only Nugget to test positive. “It’s interesting on some people on our team, traveling party and staff got it,” said the 48-year old head coach. “I hope going to Orlando (for the resumption of the NBA season) will be a safe environment and we can limit the amount of people who get it. I like to say that I got coronavirus and I kicked its butt.”
Nuggets all-star center Nikola Jokic may have been exposed to someone who tested positive for coronavirus during a recent visit to his native Serbia. Pictures show Jokic in close proximity to Nikola Jankovic, a center for KK Partizan, during last Thursday’s exhibition game honoring coach Dejan Milojevic in Belgrade. On Monday, Jankovic’s professional team announced he had tested positive for the virus. A picture in the following tweet shows Jankovic “Janker” standing to Jokic’s right.
Michele Roberts told the Globe the NBPA is prepared for several players to test positive just because of the contagiousness of the virus, regardless of the league’s safety measures and social distancing. “Of course [the players] understand it could be a positive test and they want to know what the protocol is,” Roberts said this past week. “No one is saying, ‘Suppose a player tests positive?’ We’re beyond that. The question now is, ‘When a player tests positive, what are we going to do?’ ”
“That’s the only realistic mind-set you can have going into this. A player is going to test positive,” Roberts said. “It’s not any more of this ‘if’, it’s ‘when’ and what can I do to mitigate against the ‘when.’ When it happens, if I’m not successful, what treatment is available to me, what are my chances of being really, really sick, and how are you detecting the presence of an infection? Honestly, I don’t think this is any different than what any American has to come to grips with.”
Roberts said no player is being mandated to play and there will be no repercussions — besides financially — if a player decides to sit out the season. “I don’t believe any player would say this was forced upon them, it’s not,” she said. “Not a single player has to play. This is not involuntary servitude. I don’t have to work. They don’t have to work. But it’s of course a mitigation of risk with the players. On this health and safety protocol, I’m satisfied that it can’t be any better than this. But I’m candid that it’s not bulletproof.”
Several other aspects of the NBA’s return were discussed, which The Athletic learned via sources: – A plan to play 2-to-3 exhibition games before regular season – 1,600 maximum people on campus – Coronavirus testing every day; minimum seven days of quarantine for a player who tests positive – Players and family must stay inside the bubble; families can enter after the first round – If a player contracts the virus, the NBA says they plan to continue playing
Tania Ganguli: Silver says that based on conversations with health officials he does not believe the league would need to shut down if a player tests positive for Covid-19. They'll isolate him, trace his contacts and continue testing daily and believe that will be enough to contain it.
Would you be okay playing with or against a guy that you knew tested positive for COVID19?" "Curry: Oh that'd be tough. I mean, that's one of the things that you're having to address because that is a real scenario. If you try to play and there is no vaccine, there's no way to really guarantee nobody's going to get it. I think if you are at a place where everybody says yeah we're ready to play and then they know what they're committing to. And if not, it doesn't make sense, then you won't see a ball bounce."
Silver told those on the call that if a positive test would "shut us down, we probably shouldn't go down this path." The question remains: How many positive tests would be too many, and those are among the questions that the NBA, NBPA and medical experts have to come to terms with in the coming weeks before the league and union can greenlight a resumption of play.
NBA Commissioner Adam Silver was on a conference call with representatives of the league players’ association, discussing restarting the season. His stance about one issue was clear. If the NBA was going to resume play, it would commit to staying on course even in the face of a positive COVID-19 test, or, depending on the circumstances, even a few of them. He didn’t know at the time that the leader of another major sports enterprise was already dealing with similar circumstances.
A UFC fighter and two of his cornermen had tested positive ahead of Saturday’s pay-per-view event in Jacksonville. Hours later, when the situation became known publicly, many people assumed the show would not go on. After all, the NBA immediately shut down in March when Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert became the first of its players to test positive. A zero-tolerance policy is understandable, then and now, but what Silver and UFC President Dana White came to realize is there is also likely no realistic pathway for the return of major sports competition if that is the benchmark.
Even if leagues create a “bubble,” as the UFC did this week in Jacksonville when it took over a hotel, tested everyone upon check-in and held all events at an adjacent arena, there is a good chance someone will test positive, especially when some people are asymptomatic, as Ronaldo “Jacre” Souza and his cornermen were. Without a vaccine, the question isn’t if someone will test positive, it’s what is the plan when someone does.
Myles Turner’s father, David, contracted COVID-19 soon after the league suspended operations after the Pacers’ March 10 home game. David Turner fell ill about a week before his son’s 24th birthday — March 24 — but was fortunate to avoid the fate of so many others who weren’t treated or tested immediately. In fact, his first visit to the hospital led to an incorrect H1N1 diagnosis, a flu strain.
“It was a rough patch for a couple weeks,” Turner said. “They said they think he actually contracted it in Indiana. He caught it early before all the frenzy started to happen. Once he got it, he had a whole bunch of symptoms, fever, chills, pneumonia. Had to get him to the hospital. They said he had the H1N1, sent him back home, then he started feeling worse, they sent him to a different hospital, they tested him right away. They said he had corona.”
That just isn’t likely to be in 2019-20, at least according to Kleiman. He also addressed Durant’s bout with and recovery from coronavirus. The Nets had announced that four players had tested positive. Durant was among the quartet, but Kleiman said the forward was asymptomatic at the time and perfectly recovered now. “He was fortunate that he was asymptomatic throughout, and is now clear and free of it,” said Kleiman. “But obviously quarantined like the rest of us.”
Jason Collins had dealt with these kind of symptoms. He understood them. There was a headache, and sharp body pains. It was manageable. But then Day 9 arrived, and suddenly Collins was floored by the coronavirus.
Collins feared a heart attack. The tightness in his chest was overwhelming. He checked into the hospital in Day 10 since the onset of symptoms, driven to the emergency room by this unnerving discomfort. Collins was assured by doctors that his heart wasn’t failing. “They said when the virus is peaking, this is what happens,” Collins said.
Jazz stars Rudy Gobert and Donovan Mitchell were the first NBA players test positive for coronavirus. From there, multiple potential connection points emerged. Pistons big Christian Wood – who faced Utah in Detroit a few days prior – was diagnosed with coronavirus and has since recovered. A cameraperson who worked that game, including shooting inside the Jazz locker room, was also diagnosed with coronavirus and even put into a medically reduced coma.
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August 11, 2022 | 2:12 am EDT Update

Robert Williams not available in potential trade involving Kevin Durant

There’s good reason for pessimism, Durant’s ultimatum to Nets owner Joe Tsai did not light a fire under trade talks. If anything, it made it far less likely a deal gets done in the short term. — why would Boston improve its offer now? It robbed the Nets of leverage. For example, Brooklyn was trying to get Boston to put Smart in the trade, but why would they even consider it now? That said, even without Smart (or Robert Williams III, sources told NBC Sports he is not available), a Celtics offer with Jaylen Brown may be the best one the Nets will see.
Ric Bucher: I’ve been assured that this is correct in spite of another report that says it never happened. And that’s as far as I’ll go with that, too. I’m not going to punch down. Ben Simmons was in a group chat with some of the other teams players. And on it, they asked Ben if he was playing in game four. And not only did he not answer, he dropped out of the chat. Now, as I said, there’s another reporter out there who suggested the event never happened. I’m well aware that that reporter has, let’s say he has vested interests in painting things a certain way. And again, I will leave it at that his comments prompted me to go back and double check with my source. And that source insists that it did indeed happen, and explain why someone might report it another way. So I’m sticking with it.
Patrick Beverley is not one to whine about getting moved from one team to another. The Utah Jazz guard recently addressed claims from fans about how the Minnesota Timberwolves “did him wrong when in fact that sentiment goes completely against how he views and interprets his offseason fate. Here’s Patrick Beverley going full Jay-Z, referencing the GOAT’s “I’m not a businessman, I’m a business, man” bar in explaining why he is thankful to the Timberwolves franchise.
Still, Caleb Canales’ decision to leave the NBA and coach in Mexico is not without risk. Broadening his experience on an international stage could help him get back to the league and to the job of his dreams, but his leap of faith could also be ignored. Despite a growing stable of foreign-born superstars and the NBA’s expansion to new markets overseas, the league has been slow to embrace coaches with international experience. European champions like David Blatt and Igor Kokoskov came and went last decade, as did successful foreign-born assistants like Etore Messina. “The coaching side, you always have to be ready to adapt and adjust,” Canales says.
While skepticism may remain in some NBA circles regarding the value of international coaching experience, there’s no doubt the league is putting effort in to diversify its coaching ranks overall. As of the 2022 offseason, half the league is led by Black head coaches. Nash and Kerr were born outside the U.S., and Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra is Filipino-American. Canales credits the work of David Fogel, executive director of the National Basketball Coaches Association, and Karen Marrero, its director of communications, for things improving over the last few seasons. “They’ve been so creative, and they’ve been so willing to help us, as coaches,” he stresses, highlighting the coaching profiles as well as a newly deployed coaches database the NBCA has set up to assist teams in finding and hiring talent outside the same small coaching pool.