NBA rumors: Sixers to sign Chasson Randle to three-year deal

More on Chasson Randle Free Agency

Tom Moore: Chasson Randle not listed in #Sixers game notes. Not sure what that means. Had to re-sign to 2nd 10-day contract or waive. No official news
Derek Bodner: Source confirms @Shams Charania report that the #sixers will sign former Stanford guard Chasson Randle. Likely to happen tomorrow. Randle has averaged 20.7 points, 3.6 rebounds, and 3.4 assists per game for the Westchester Knicks, New York's D-League Affiliate.
Keith Pompey: A league source confirms a Vertical report that the #Sixers will sign Chassan Randle on Tuesday.
Nets Daily: Hearing he's not the only D-League PG getting workout with Philly. - RT: Marc Berman: With Baker contract getting guarantee for season, Knicks D-Leaguer Chasson Randle will work out for Sixers. http://nyp.st/2jgEfKk
With undrafted rookie Ron Baker solidifying his place as a Knick after Friday’s heroics in Milwaukee, Westchester Knicks point guard Chasson Randle has a workout Sunday with the 76ers, according to an NBA source. The Sixers have been looking for perimeter help to offset their glut of big men.
Meanwhile, Chasson Randle, the Knicks’ summer-league sensation who got hurt in training camp, wallows in the D-League with Westchester. Randle posted 38 points Friday against the Texas Legends, making 12 of 19 baskets. According to a source, the Mavericks and 76ers have some interest in Randle, though they don’t have open roster spots. Randle is a free agent, but the Knicks probably would have to cut Mo Ndour to make space. There was a lot of talk going into training camp about not having a legitimate third point guard if Rose struggled with injuries. Rose played 65 games last season.
NY_KnicksPR: Oct. 21, 2016 – NYK announced today that the team has waived Randle, Tokoto, Amundson, Early & Inglis. The roster now stands at 15 players.
Alex Kennedy: According to sources, the Houston Rockets' recent free agent mini-camp included the following: Chris Copeland, Ray McCallum, Phil Pressey, Alex Kirk, Peyton Siva, Greg Whittington, Denzel Livingston, Chris Walker, Victor Rudd, Scott Suggs and Chasson Randle among others.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 69 more rumors
More HoopsHype Rumors
May 12, 2021 | 9:14 am EDT Update
The resilience that helped Murray push through a trying professional start wasn’t entirely organic, though. It was molded through heartbreak; a glimpse at why he is the way he is only fortifies the belief that Murray is a person worth investing in. Years before he was a Spur, when even the thought of playing in the NBA was a different universe over, Murray faced a nightmarish adolescence, perfused by grief, terror and harrowing uncertainty. “It’s a story that’s never been heard before because I was in the streets for real, for real. I didn’t live off of nobody’s name,” he says. “It ain’t nothing to brag about. This s— is crazy when I wake up. I’m playing in the NBA. I’m on a video game. I have fans that buy my jersey. It still don’t feel real. I’ve been here five years; I feel like it’s a dream still.”
Every player who makes the NBA is a miracle. Every story is spruced with dabs of luck, a trail of serendipity, cosmic happenstance and mounds of adversity that were eventually cleared. For Murray, the mere fact that he’s still alive and free is its own tall tale. “I feel like the path I took to get here,” he starts, “what I had overcome, nobody ever overcame. Nobody’s ever been in my situation and made it to where I’m at today.”
“I’m in the stage right now where I’m trying to figure out how I’m going to tell my story to motivate the world and allow the world to know who Dejounte Murray is,” he says. “I’ve been real quiet and to myself about it, because it traumatized me. To this day it haunts me still. If you just think of the streets, a young kid in the streets, gangbanging, around drugs and just doing anything to get money, that was what it was. That’s what I was. I wouldn’t even say I was taught that. It was that or it was no way.”
When Murray was first arrested in middle school, it didn’t phase him. “Juvenile? That was nothing to me at 11 years old. I wasn’t scared; I wasn’t nervous, because I knew what to expect from going to jail.” His relationship with violence was frequent, felt in the body-numbing sensation that takes over after hearing a close friend or cousin has been fatally shot. His mother was in and out of prison and his father wasn’t always around. “I love my mom to death. My dad, me and him are still working on ways to become closer,” Murray says. “He wasn’t a deadbeat, but neither one of them were full-time parents.”
Murray bounced from one apartment to the next, one hotel room to another. Couch to couch. His mother was kicked off state housing the first time he was arrested. Evictions weren’t uncommon. “I don’t even have a favorite cartoon. That’s how much I was in the streets. You know what I’m saying?” Murray says. “I can’t even tell my daughter I had a favorite cartoon growing up, and that f—- with me. That bothers me a lot.”
Home