Storyline: Andrew Wiggins Trade?

23 rumors in this storyline

The belief across the league this summer was that Wiggins could be had for the right offer. Rosas did not acquire him in trade and did not sign him to the max contract extension. But the two have formed a strong relationship in the early going and Wiggins has also responded well to Saunders’ coaching when it comes to changing his shot profile. There is no indication that the team is looking to trade Wiggins right now. The team has been both privately and publicly encouraged by Wiggins’ willingness to embrace this new approach and the results that have come with it. Saunders is firmly in his corner and Rosas has forged a strong working relationship with him.

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“I went through a lot earlier in my career and everything, he was there to listen to me and help me out,” Wiggins told SI.com. “To give me advice. So he got my trust and respect early.” Together, Rosas and Saunders had one question: Did Wiggins want to be there? Rosas remembers the answer, vividly. “He said, ‘Hey, I don’t want to go anywhere. I want to be successful here. I want the organization to be successful and I want to do everything within my power to make that happen,’” Rosas said. “I took him at his word.”

Former Atlanta Hawks general manager Wes Wilcox appeared on NBA TV on Monday and discussed six players who could be traded now, later this season and in the future. The list included Oklahoma City point guard Chris Paul, Cleveland Cavaliers power forward Kevin Love, Washington Wizard shooting guard Bradley Beal, Minnesota Timberwolves small forward Andrew Wiggins, Memphis Grizzlies small forward Andre Iguodala and Booker. Wilcox put Booker and Wiggins in the “future” category. “Of these six names, Chris Paul and (Andre) and Iguodala, we know that they’re in the trade market and they’re available,” said Wilcox during NBA TV’s 2019-20 regular-season schedule release special Monday. “Of these other four names, we can probably take (Andrew) Wiggins and (Devin) Booker into the future,” Wilcox continued.

Towns and Russell were taken Nos. 1 and 2, respectively, in the 2015 NBA draft and have been close friends since high school. Towns is really high on adding Russell, sources said. It would take moving Andrew Wiggins or a combination of Jeff Teague and Gorgui Dieng to open the space needed for Minnesota to sign Russell. The Nets would have two days to match a signed offer sheet to retain Russell.

MARC STEIN: The Spurs’ asking price for a player regarded as the league’s most menacing two-way force when healthy, for the moment, is thus still said to be rather high. But I have little doubt Ujiri is willing to trade any Raptor on the roster if he finds a deal he likes — even after LeBron James’ departure to the Western Conference. The Raptors, I’m told, held exploratory discussions in the summer of 2017 with Minnesota on a deal that would have been headlined by DeRozan and the Timberwolves’ Canadian swingman Andrew Wiggins. No trade materialized, but it reaffirms the notion that not even DeRozan, at the peak of his career, is untouchable in Toronto.

One name brought up often in recent days has been Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan, who could become available should the Raptors look to make wholesale changes following a third straight loss to LeBron James and the Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference playoffs. Wiggins’ Canadian roots could make him an attractive option for the Raptors and good reason to hope that they could get the best out of him while playing in his backyard. In some ways, DeRozan could provide a good blueprint for Wiggins to follow. DeRozan didn’t become a real star in the league until his fifth year and has proven to be effective even though he isn’t a knockdown three-point shooter. But his game is also similar to Butler’s, so it is hard to see how a swap like that would give the Wolves what they are looking for in terms of a different look aside their leader.

But from what I can gather, Wiggins doesn’t have a huge amount of value on the market right now. He’s about to start a five-year, $148 million contract and is coming off of a less-than-convincing fourth season in the league. If there isn’t a great market, they might be better off just holding on to him and trying to keep developing him. I still think that the best possible outcome for the Wolves is to get Wiggins to blossom into the kind of All-Star caliber player the organization envisioned when he was signed to the max extension.

Nate Duncan: Do you think that Andrew Wiggins, a couple of years from now, is on [the Minnesota Timberwolves]? Do you think there’s a chance they might move on from him, given how he’s played this year? Marc Stein: I think that’s something that people will be looking at and I think other teams will be coming after him. Because he’s, at best, gonna be the third option if you’re playing with Jimmy Butler and Karl-Anthony Towns. [….] I don’t think there’s any question that Wiggins’ future is gonna be talked about. He’s under contract now—it’s a big number but for some teams, that appeals, to be able to get a guy when there is contract certainty and you know you’ve got him, there will be teams who want to trade for that.

The Timberwolves explored several trade options in June, including for Chicago star Jimmy Butler, but Thibodeau, also Minnesota’s president of basketball operations, now sounds as committed as anyone in the franchise to his young trio. Outside the organization, executives wonder about Minnesota’s inclination to keep all three. But within the franchise, there is no question: management and owner Glen Taylor will do whatever it takes financially in order to win. “I love our core three guys, and what I love most is their work ethic, their dedication to work,” Thibodeau said. “They understand the level we need to reach, particularly defensively, and their work shows that they will work to get it right. We understand that it’s going to take some time and we need to work at it each and every day.”
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January 21, 2020 | 5:32 pm UTC Update
John Wall, Bradley Beal, Wes Unseld. That’s how the Wizards’ all-time scoring list reads from No.’s three through five after Monday’s Wizards win over the Pistons, as Beal moved into sole possession of fourth place with a good chance of passing Wall before the season is over. Unseld remains the most accomplished player in Wizards/Bullets franchise history as an NBA champion, 1977-78 Finals MVP, 1968-69 league MVP and rookie of the year plus a Hall of Fame induction. But Beal passing him is another reminder he already has a place among Wizards and Bullets luminaries.
“That’s an honor because that list is full of greats, true Wizards and Bullets legends. To be a part of that is an honor,” Beal said. Within the context of Wizards franchise history, Beal has already separated himself as one of the best to ever suit up. In addition to being fourth in points, he is the all-time leader in three-pointers, sixth in assists, seventh in steals and 10th in win shares. He also has the single-season record for threes. That’s not bad for a guy who is 26 years old.
Continuing to make his mark on the Wizards/Bullets franchise seems to be genuinely important to Beal. During his halftime interview with NBC Sports Washington’s Chris Miller, he mentioned the team’s Baltimore days when discussing the Unseld feat. Back when he signed his contract extension in October, he explained the decision partly in terms of creating a legacy in Washington and taking the franchise to places it hasn’t been in a long time. On Monday, he alluded to those goals again. “I never would have dreamt of that or thought of that coming here. To still be here is an honor, too. I’m just taking it in full stride. I’ve still got a lot more basketball to play, so who knows where I’ll end up,” he said.
January 21, 2020 | 4:21 pm UTC Update
In the wake of Michael Porter Jr.’s 20-point, and a career-high 14-rebound night, the rookie said his biggest area of growth has been letting the game come to him and not chasing individual stats. It’s telling that Porter’s veterans are thrilled with how he’s going about his ascendance. Of course, having Porter alleviates some of the burden on Jokic, especially with so many contributors out, but he gushed about what he brought them last night.
January 21, 2020 | 4:14 pm UTC Update
Monday was the final day of fan All-Star voting. For Alex Caruso, it was greeted with an exhale. The 25-year-old guard has enjoyed riding the wave of a surge of fan voting, clocking in a No. 4 among Western Conference guards last Thursday ahead of such esteemed players as Russell Westbrook, Donovan Mitchell and Devin Booker. But fun is fun. Even Caruso isn’t stumping for himself at this point.
Storyline: All-Star Selections
For the casual NBA fans who might not know, there is this thing in the NBA called a “shootaround.” It takes place the morning of a game, unless the team played the night before, and is used for the purposes of: going over the scouting report and new plays or schemes for the night’s opponent; working out injured players; getting some extra shooting; pulling players out of bed, making sure they aren’t too hung over. At least, that was the practice for most teams for years. A growing trend in the league over the last two years is to reduce shootarounds in an effort to maximize sleep and rest. At least that’s what the teams say. The Lakers are one of those teams.
I’ll cut to the chase. You’re hearing less from your favorite NBA players than normal this season, and the disappearance of the “shootaround” is a reason. Except, the shootaround really hasn’t gone away. Teams, like the Lakers, are still holding meetings and walk-throughs and working out injured players the mornings of games, they just aren’t inviting the media. They get away with it by not calling whatever it is that they’re doing a “shootaround.”
To wrap this up… I’ve been a reporter for about 20 years. I’ve learned readers often don’t really care about “access,” something that is near and dear to any journalist’s heart, whether he’s covering an NBA MVP or a president of the United States. I, actually, do not typically worship at this altar. There are ways to get information outside of the scrums of tape and video recorders that crowd locker rooms on game days. I told you Saturday night about LeBron being less accessible than he’s ever been. This is the other shoe. If you’re wondering why, more so this season than any in recent memory, on the days of games you aren’t reading stories or watching video clips of LeBron talking about his return to TD Garden, where he has so much history, or plans to hop in the car and catch Bronny’s game, or something eloquent about playing on MLK Day, this is why.
January 21, 2020 | 1:11 pm UTC Update
Even though he’s posting career-best numbers and is in the midst of establishing individual records, Terry Rozier isn’t about to proclaim he’s arrived. Far from it in fact. “I feel like I ain’t proved shit yet and it’s not to the doubters,” Rozier said. “I give a damn what they say. It’s more to my loved ones, to my family. People that look at me and I really know how much they care about me. Those are the ones that I really want to show what I can do. And like I said, I haven’t showed them nothing yet and I want to keep improving.”
Can you explain how Devonte’ Graham moving to the starting five has allowed you to flourish? Kemba Walker: We complement each other. Two guys that can bring up the ball, look for our shot or look for others, create for ourselves or create for others. So he’s just a guy that takes a lot of pressure off me when I’m out there. He’s got the ball in his hands a lot, too. So just make it work, man. If you can play this game, you find ways to make it work. No matter who you are out there on the court with. No excuses.
Parsons suffered a traumatic brain injury, disk herniation and a torn labrum in a crash on Wednesday, according to his attorneys. Parsons was hit by a driver, who the attorneys say was charged with driving under the influence of alcohol. “I called and talk to his friends and family last night,” Rivers said. “It’s scary what happened to him. It’s very unfortunate what happened. They seemed in good spirits last night about the fact he’s doing better. I didn’t talk to him, obviously.”
January 21, 2020 | 8:11 am UTC Update
Celtics swingman Jaylen Brown thought Boston wouldn’t budge from its original $80 million extension offer before the front office substantially sweetened the pot, he told ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski on the Woj Pod (hat tip to Nick Goss of NBC Sports Boston). Brown eventually signed a four-year, $115 million rookie-scale extension, which included $12 million in incentives. “To be honest, I came with the mindset I didn’t think that anything was going to get done,” Brown told Wojnarowski. “I wasn’t sure that anything was going to get done. The first offer was four years, $80 million. I didn’t think they were going to budge from that. So, I came with the mindset, I told (agent Jason) Glushon that, ‘Let’s see what can happen, you know?’ For me, I didn’t think Jason was going to be able to get anything done. I thought they were going to stay at ($80 million) and that was going to be it.”
Without an extension, Brown would have entered restricted free agency this summer. He was fully prepared to do that until the offer grew. “I was hell-bent, I was already locked in, focused, ready to carry the weight that I was going to go into this year playing my fourth year out. And then they jumped up, and that just showed they wanted me here in the organization,” he said on the podcast. “They appreciated my value. They thought that I added to winning. It was an offer that was too hard to kind of turn down.”
“I think you just don’t know what it’s going to be like to coach stars of that ilk,” Vogel said. “They’ve been wonderful, from the time I took the job, they’ve been very collaborative. Come together with a plan, they’ve helped with the buy in with the rest of the group. It hasn’t been the type of challenge that you may expect coaching stars of that caliber.”
In his second interview since getting axed in December, David Fizdale was on “The Jump” and repeated he had no “regret’ but added: “For me personally, the toughest part was that I didn’t fulfill what I went there to do. I wanted to give the fans a relative team, a winner. The fan base was so awesome and so passionate about the team. The fact that I couldn’t get over the hump to where I wanted to get it to; that part is a tough pill to swallow.”
Storyline: David Fizdale Firing
Any team that holds a formal “shootaround” or, for that matter, a practice, has to invite the media. Players are also supposed to be available in the locker room for 30 minutes prior to each game, but there is a basic working agreement between the league and press that players should either be available at shootaround or before the game, but not both. What has happened, though, is that most of the league’s stars, LeBron included, do not talk in that 30-minute span, ever, even if there is no shootaround.
Teams, like the Lakers, are still holding meetings and walk-throughs and working out injured players the mornings of games, they just aren’t inviting the media. They get away with it by not calling whatever it is that they’re doing a “shootaround.” Not every team is doing this — the Celtics, for instance, had a lengthy shootaround and media session afterward Monday morning — but the Lakers appear to be one. Over and over, the team announces it is not holding a shootaround (or even a practice on an off day), and then their players contradict them by referencing the workouts after the fact. On Monday, Quinn Cook posted a picture to social media of Danny Green at TD Garden for a morning workout.