Storyline: Anne Donovan Death

2 rumors in this storyline

4 months ago via ESPN
Anne Donovan, a legendary figure in women’s basketball who won Olympic gold as a player and as a coach for the United States, died Wednesday of heart failure. She was 56. “While it is extremely difficult to express how devastating it is to lose Anne, our family remains so very grateful to have been blessed with such a wonderful human being,” Donovan’s family said in a statement. “Anne touched many lives as a daughter, sister, aunt, friend and coach.”

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4 months ago via ESPN

Donovan was in Knoxville, Tennessee, this past weekend for the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame induction of Rose Marie Battaglia, her former high school coach in Paramus. “Anne was a person with strong faith, courageous spirit, a giving heart and love for everyone,” Donovan’s family said in its statement. “We are so proud of her accomplishments as a women’s basketball player and coach, but even more proud of her character, integrity, humility and kindness. “We appreciate your respect for our family’s privacy during this very sad time.”
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October 15, 2018 | 8:53 am EDT Update
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26 mins ago via ESPN
So what does a culture defined by the Sixers’ young superstars look like? Is there sufficient oxygen in Philadelphia for Simmons, a far more introverted personality than the vocal Embiid, to contribute to the collective identity? Can Simmons be satisfied with broad admiration for his competitiveness and selflessness as a player, if Embiid is beloved as a charismatic leader? Many inside the franchise believe that the dynamic will reveal itself over time, as it does in any marriage. “Those guys are still figuring it out,” JJ Redick says. “They’re evolving players, but even more important, they’re evolving people.”
26 mins ago via ESPN
“Say you tear your ACL or Achilles,” Fultz says. “The first time you do your rehab, no matter what you do, your first step out of the boot, you’re going to think that your foot … it doesn’t feel right, but what is it? If something happens to you, you’re automatically going to start thinking about it because you’re normal. You wanna figure out what it is. And just trying to figure things out, you’re gonna fry your brain. I didn’t have any special mental illness. It was a normal mental thing of just trying to figure out what was going on and just working through it.”
26 mins ago via ESPN
“I’ve put in so much work, I wasn’t really worried about anything,” Fultz says as he catches a glimpse of a Sixers preview segment on NBA TV on a far wall at the team’s training facility. “I saw the media and I was kind of smiling, because I was like, ‘They probably can’t wait for this moment right here.’ I’m pretty sure a lot of them were probably thinking, ‘Oh, he’s gonna miss.’ I just made both free throws — shutting up the haters.”
26 mins ago via ESPN