NBA Rumor: Chandler Parsons Free Agency

99 rumors in this storyline

More Rumors in this Storyline

Now that your contract (and many other big deals that were signed that summer) is coming to an end, are you sort of excited for a new chapter? Chandler Parsons: I am excited. I went from my rookie deal the first three years to a max contract over the last six years. So I’ve had a lot of expectations, a lot of pressure. And I haven’t been the healthiest player in the league. I think just to get on a team next year, on a financial friendly deal, it changes the whole look of you to the fans as well as the media and everything. You see a lot of guys that do that. Dwight Howard on a max deal was awful. Dwight on an interim deal is phenomenal. Someone like Andre Iguodala, when he goes to say, the Lakers for minimum, he’s going to be this huge value and people are going to love him. That’s just how it goes. I have no complaints. I’ve played basketball in the NBA. I set up my future here. I still think there is time to just show I can still play. I just turned 31. It’s still young and, technically, I should be in my prime. I’m not worried about it. I just want to play.

Why Memphis over Portland? Chandler Parsons: It was a very, very tough decision. I have nothing but respect for Portland and what they’re doing, and I think they have a tremendous future. This really just came down to a gut feeling of mine. I felt extremely comfortable with the management and coach [David] Fizdale. We hit it off right away. We had a past relationship with him being my coach in the Rookie-Sophomore game, and I actually randomly saw him in Orlando with my parents and stopped and talked to him for like 30 minutes when he was still with Miami. Just looking at his body of work with what he’s done with wings in the league and his vision for me, it just felt right. It basically came down to me being comfortable and trusting the coaching staff. They made unbelievable points about how my usage rate has been down my entire career. The way he’s going to use me in this offense, I think I can really flourish and be the best player I can be.

Are you disappointed that the Mavericks — and especially Mark Cuban, considering your relationship — didn’t really make much of an effort to keep you? Parsons: It was more shocking. It is a business and I understand that aspect of it. I think the fans of Dallas were great, but they don’t really understand the whole story of everything. If they did, they wouldn’t have negative feelings towards me. Everything I did in Dallas was for the team and for the organization and for the city. Whether that’s recruiting DeAndre Jordan, putting my absolute heart into that, although it didn’t work, that was to make our franchise better and to help us win games. Getting hurt two times, that’s just bad luck. It’s kind of sickening when you see fans write something about your injuries or my knees, like that’s in my control.

“The worst thing we can do is overpay for mediocrity,” a team source told ESPN, acknowledging that the Mavs need to find a way to hop off the mediocrity treadmill Cuban fears so much, one way or the other. That comment could be perceived as a jab at Parsons, a good guy who ruffled a few feathers in Dallas by considering himself the future face of the franchise after arriving as a post-Melo consolation prize. This certainly wasn’t what the Mavs or Parsons planned when he signed that three-year, $46 million offer sheet while partying with Cuban in an Orlando club two summers ago (the last year had a player option).

The Mavs, according to sources, remain interested in keeping Parsons if they aren’t able to persuade Conley and/or Whiteside to come to Dallas. However, the Mavs have made it clear to Parsons that they do not intend to offer him a max contract to keep him after his first two seasons in Dallas ended prematurely because of surgeries on his right knee. A max contract for Parsons with the Mavs, who own his early Bird rights, would be worth $98.4 million over four years. Other teams can offer him $94.1 million over four years.

Speaking of next season, the world’s worst-kept secret is that you’re opting out of your contract this summer. Will you be back in Dallas? Parsons: That’s something that we’ve got to figure out. Obviously, I’ve been extremely happy here, and I think I’ve made it very vocal that I love Dallas. I love the organization. Everything I did last summer with the free agency and the recruiting efforts is something I really enjoy doing. It’s something that I feel like I’m pretty good at doing. I have a great relationship with Coach Carlisle and Dirk [Nowitzki] and my teammates here. Cuban’s obviously my guy, and I wouldn’t want to play for anybody else. I feel like he’s the best owner in the NBA.

However, Parsons and his inner circle have expressed concerns about whether Carlisle has confidence that Parsons can be a franchise player and is willing to give him the freedoms and responsibilities players of that ilk typically receive. Those doubts are fueled in part by occasional crunch-time benchings this season, even after Parsons, who averaged 18.8 points on 52.3 percent shooting from the floor in February, returned to form following a difficult rehab from major knee surgery.
More HoopsHype Rumors
January 27, 2021 | 8:36 pm EST Update
Attempts to grow closer as a team are confronting a world in which proximity to teammates is both dangerous and prohibited. As a result, NBA players and staffs have been reduced to distant conversations through face masks, and a road life dominated by individual screens rather than collective camaraderie. “The reality is that you can’t do stuff like that anymore,” Haslem said. “Those opportunities don’t exist.” In Indiana Pacers center Myles Turner’s words: “It’s a bubble within a bubble.”
Storyline: Coronavirus
STARTING AN AVERAGE day on the road, an NBA player must now wake up as early as 7:30 a.m. to be tested before a practice or shootaround, depending on the market. He then returns to his room to catch another hour or so of sleep, or to busy himself with a video game, an episode of a series or maybe a FaceTime session with family back home. A couple of hours later, he reports downstairs to board the team bus. The wait in the lobby is traditionally a time when players schmooze and hang out, but with everyone at least 6 feet apart and masked, the vibe has taken on an edgy quality.
Pre-practice strategy sessions at the hotel can no longer last more than 10 minutes. Shootaround or practice offer some normalcy, but breakfast back at the hotel in a ballroom, typically a communal ritual where players and staff yuck it up at tables for eight, now operates as a grab-and-go. Want some fresh air? Forget about taking a walk outside, even though the CDC and other leading medical institutions regard outdoor activities with the appropriate precautions as low risk.
This season, that ground rarely extends much past the door to a hotel room. The Spurs’ custom on the plane has been effectively prohibited. Under the new guidelines, players must sit next to the same guys they sit next to on the bench during games. On an off night, it’s dinners for one in the room — a far cry from the jovial dining out experience in a road city. “I think that’s hard — having options taken away,” Holiday said. “You might go to your favorite city, and have a favorite food spot that people might not know about. And that’s something that you can bring to the table, something you share, and [this season] you can’t really share that.”