NBA Rumor: Dante Exum Injury

148 rumors in this storyline

Alykhan Bijani: #Rockets Injury/Status: Dante Exum (NWT-R Calf Strain) Eric Gordon (Out-R Groin Strain) Danuel House (Out-R Knee Contusion) Rodions Kurucs (NWT–L Oblique Strain) Davis Nwaba (Questionable–R Wrist Strain) Victor Oladipo (Out–R Quad; Injury Maintenance) PJ Tucker (NWT) John Wall (Out–L Knee Contusion) Christian Wood (Out–R Ankle Sprain)

More Rumors in this Storyline

Was this preventable? That was the first thing Danté Exum asked his surgeon. The Utah Jazz guard had just been dealt another setback, another injury in his young career. And he wanted to know if it was his fault. The surgeon told him, No. There was nothing he could have done. Then, Exum’s mindset shifted. “I can’t control the uncontrollable,” he said. “There’s no point in me sitting here all said and praying and wishing and wanting to be on the court. It’s just about whatever I can do moving forward.”

“Right before I got my ankle injury, I felt the most confidence I’ve ever had,” Exum said. “I was playing well. I felt like I was with the team and knew what everyone was thinking. It clicked in my head that I can do this. I can be a great player.” Exum returned for three games in mid-March before he suffered another season-ending injury. “It’s been the toughest road for me,” he said. “I’m not going to lie. Going through this—this was definitely the hardest one. But I felt like I’ve dealt with it the best.”

The Jazz still haven’t given an official return date, but league sources tell The Tribune that Dante Exum hopes to come back following the All-Star break. Exum originally separated his shoulder against the Phoenix Suns in the preseason. He damaged ligaments in his shoulder and underwent surgery to repair the injury. “It’s really good to see him out there,” Jazz coach Quin Snyder said. “I was talking to Dante and he told me he feels like a basketball player again. So it’s definitely good to see him on the floor.”

Exum said he saw three doctors and talked to “six or seven” more over the past week as he made a decision with input from his family, agent and the Jazz organization. “I’m confident with the decision I made,” he said. “That’s why we took a lot of time to make the right decision for me, not just this year but long term. There was a non-surgical option, but we evaluated that and it didn’t seem like the right choice for me at this time of my career.”
More HoopsHype Rumors
May 12, 2021 | 9:14 am EDT Update
The resilience that helped Murray push through a trying professional start wasn’t entirely organic, though. It was molded through heartbreak; a glimpse at why he is the way he is only fortifies the belief that Murray is a person worth investing in. Years before he was a Spur, when even the thought of playing in the NBA was a different universe over, Murray faced a nightmarish adolescence, perfused by grief, terror and harrowing uncertainty. “It’s a story that’s never been heard before because I was in the streets for real, for real. I didn’t live off of nobody’s name,” he says. “It ain’t nothing to brag about. This s— is crazy when I wake up. I’m playing in the NBA. I’m on a video game. I have fans that buy my jersey. It still don’t feel real. I’ve been here five years; I feel like it’s a dream still.”
Every player who makes the NBA is a miracle. Every story is spruced with dabs of luck, a trail of serendipity, cosmic happenstance and mounds of adversity that were eventually cleared. For Murray, the mere fact that he’s still alive and free is its own tall tale. “I feel like the path I took to get here,” he starts, “what I had overcome, nobody ever overcame. Nobody’s ever been in my situation and made it to where I’m at today.”
“I’m in the stage right now where I’m trying to figure out how I’m going to tell my story to motivate the world and allow the world to know who Dejounte Murray is,” he says. “I’ve been real quiet and to myself about it, because it traumatized me. To this day it haunts me still. If you just think of the streets, a young kid in the streets, gangbanging, around drugs and just doing anything to get money, that was what it was. That’s what I was. I wouldn’t even say I was taught that. It was that or it was no way.”
When Murray was first arrested in middle school, it didn’t phase him. “Juvenile? That was nothing to me at 11 years old. I wasn’t scared; I wasn’t nervous, because I knew what to expect from going to jail.” His relationship with violence was frequent, felt in the body-numbing sensation that takes over after hearing a close friend or cousin has been fatally shot. His mother was in and out of prison and his father wasn’t always around. “I love my mom to death. My dad, me and him are still working on ways to become closer,” Murray says. “He wasn’t a deadbeat, but neither one of them were full-time parents.”