Storyline: Dante Exum Injury

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The Jazz still haven’t given an official return date, but league sources tell The Tribune that Dante Exum hopes to come back following the All-Star break. Exum originally separated his shoulder against the Phoenix Suns in the preseason. He damaged ligaments in his shoulder and underwent surgery to repair the injury. “It’s really good to see him out there,” Jazz coach Quin Snyder said. “I was talking to Dante and he told me he feels like a basketball player again. So it’s definitely good to see him on the floor.”

Exum said he saw three doctors and talked to “six or seven” more over the past week as he made a decision with input from his family, agent and the Jazz organization. “I’m confident with the decision I made,” he said. “That’s why we took a lot of time to make the right decision for me, not just this year but long term. There was a non-surgical option, but we evaluated that and it didn’t seem like the right choice for me at this time of my career.”

Q: What do you expect from Dante Exum as he returns from his knee injury? Quin Snyder: As much as we can get. I think that’s an injury that he’ll be back from, but it’s not a simple thing. There’s a process that you go through — any player with any injury. I think that going from becoming healthy physically to getting to compete again to kind of finding your game and continuing to improve. We don’t really have a specific timetable on that as far as where he is, but I know he’s missed playing. He loves to play and I think this will be an opportunity for him to start doing that again and I know he’s excited and we’re excited for him.

Skipping out on the Olympics, albeit a tough decision because of personal reasons and national pride, will prevent Exum from being overextended too quickly this summer due to national team duties. “At this stage the most important thing for me right now is to continue training,” Exum said via a press release. “It’s been great to be back on the court competing, and I’m really motivated to help the Jazz have a successful season this year. My support and best wishes will be with the Boomers this summer, and I look forward to future opportunities to represent my home country.”

All 12 players from the successful 2015 Oceania Championships will be present at the camp, Kevin Lisch will debut with the squad while Dante Exum’s rehabilitation is progressing. “Dante is going really well,” said Lemanis. “His rehab is on track but there are still a few hurdles to overcome. Dante needs to be confident he can handle the load of the campaign, the Jazz need to be comfortable with his involvement in the program and we all need to feel that his skill set is back to where it needs to be to compete on the world stage.”

One of the scarce graces of a serious knee injury at the age of 20, of having patience forcefully wedged into his basketball experience, is that the downtime has given Exum a chance to ease the whole thing back, to watch and learn, to soak in his surroundings and to set his place in them. And that, along with healing, is exactly what the point guard has done. His mind, essentially, has caught up with his body, with where the hint and promise of his physical attributes have carried him. “It’s given me an opportunity to kind of work on everything that I need to work on, and step back from the game and be able to learn,” he said. “Being away from playing, and seeing the team, you get to kind of realize how we can get better.”

Gordon Hayward: On that note, I want to send my best wishes out to Danté Exum. He was playing with his Australian team when he suffered a knee injury, which is really unfortunate and pretty tough to hear about. You don’t want to see that happen to anybody, let alone one of your teammates. So it’s a tough situation. I reached out to him when I heard and I know he was pretty bummed and probably getting phone calls and text messages from everyone. So I just told him that we’re all here for him, and that sometimes, you’ve got to take a step backwards to take two forward.

While Exum is guaranteed to get another contract, Dellavedova is on a one-year, $1.6m deal which holds no guarantees of extension should he pick up a serious injury playing for the Boomers. Dellavedova said Exum’s injury had not made him rethink his Boomers future, however: “Dante will be back stronger than ever from his injury, but nah, for me you can get injured playing pickup basketball anywhere. “You’ve obviously got to be smart and take care of yourself because you’ve only got a small window for your playing career, but you don’t want to wrap yourself up in cotton wool either because this is what you play for, to play for the green and gold.”

Dante Exum goes down

Exum suffered a left knee injury on Aug. 4 while competing for the Australian National Team in a game against the Slovenian National Team in Ljubljana, Slovenia. After returning to Salt Lake City, he underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at University of Utah Health Care’s Orthopaedic Center this morning. Following the examination, Jazz physicians Dr. Travis Maak and Dr. David Petron determined that Exum sustained a tear of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in his left knee.
4 years ago via TVNZ

Jazz teammate and fellow Boomer Joe Ingles spoke to Exum soon after he suffered the injury from Sydney. “He was obviously pretty down,” said Ingles, who is sitting out the Boomers’ qualifying campaign to recover from a tough first NBA season. “It didn’t look great but obviously you hope for the best and hope it’s not (a torn ACL). “Me and Dante are really good mates, roommates, and obviously playing in Utah this year, it was another step of our friendship.
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