NBA Rumor: Dennis Schroeder Trade?

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What trade value would Schroeder have at the deadline for a contending team? C’s will be good this season, so probably won’t happen, but would Schroeder command a protected 1st or good young player? — Mr. Positive. Brian Robb: I think that either of those returns would probably be a very best-case scenario. The good news for Boston when it comes to Schroder’s trade value is that his contract is very cheap so it would be very easy for a team to add him without going over their budget. The problem for Brad Stevens is that Schroder does not have any Bird Rights after signing a one-year deal. That means any team that trades for him will need to use their own cap space to re-sign him. Most playoff teams are capped out for next summer already so that should limit a potential return in the event the Celtics decide to move on. If some team gets desperate, perhaps a late first-round pick could be in play but a couple of second-round picks and/or an unproven young player with promise seems more likely if Schroder has a good first half of the year and Boston wants to move on.

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Kings, Wizards not interested in a Dennis Schroeder sign-and-trade

There is some beautiful-mind framework in which the Lakers might still sign-and-trade Schroder and acquire Hield. It’s just hard to find it. The Wizards and Kings don’t want Schroder, sources said. The Lakers would need a fourth team that does, with assets the Kings want. (The Lakers do avoid the hard cap here by not acquiring a player in a sign-and-trade — one reason DeMar DeRozan and Kyle Lowry were likely off the board.)

Lakers shopped Dennis Schroeder and Montrezl Harrell last month due to uncertainty about their fit

The roster moves that looked so good in November, winning raves for the Lakers’ front office, haven’t panned out. Dennis Schröder and Montrezl Harrell have not proved capable of pinch-carrying the Lakers during the regular season when James and Davis are unavailable. I believed, as resolutely as the Lakers, that they would be, but Schröder and Harrell tend to be more concerned with their own scoring than anything else. When the Lakers explored the trade market for both last month, it seemed to confirm their own uncertainty about the fit.

Dennis Schroeder turned down an extension from the Lakers worth $80 million over four years

Don’t be surprised that the Los Angeles Lakers were prepared to trade Dennis Schröder. […] Schröder, 27, was available because of the gulf between player and team in contract extension talks. He has rebuffed extension offers from the Lakers in the range of $80 million over four years, according to two people familiar with the discussions who were not authorized to discuss them publicly.

But Schröder also is not awful on defense. It won’t be a problem like the Clippers have with Lou Williams. The Thunder actually had a much better defensive rating with him on the floor (103.0) than off of it (111.8) last season. It was the same situation in OKC’s seven-game first-round series against the Rockets: 103.8 with Schröder on it, team-worst 114.9 with him off of it. That might be the greatest argument why Schröder will work in the postseason for a defense-first Lakers team. He just worked in a playoff series against a conference rival.

Would guard Dennis Schroder from OKC help the Mavs? Maybe, but every time we think of Schroder we think of Dirk Nowitzki’s privately-held unflattering opinion of him. We’re not sure this is a great pairing with Luka Doncic. Schroder is worth a mention, though, for another reason that mirrors an Oubre motivation: As the Mavs ready for more big steps in the future, it’s important to know that Schroder’s coming contract pays him $15.5 million and is expiring. Oubre’s is at $14.4 mil, and, yes, it’s expiring.

On Chris Paul trade scenarios: Gozlan: “Eric Bledsoe, Ersan Ilyasova – assuming you guarantee his $7 million salary for next season – and then you can do a variation of George Hill. I don’t think they want to trade George Hill. I think he was awesome for them, and they want to keep him. In that case, you can get away with Robin Lopez and DJ Wilson. After that, then you start talking about the incentives, maybe Donte DiVincenzo. On OKC’s side, they’d love to get a lot of picks and young players.” Scotto: “At that point, if you’re OKC, you’re signaling you’re fully rebuilding, and you’re going to really start to gut that roster. If you get rid of Chris Paul, Steven Adams will probably be talked about in trades. Dennis Schroeder as well. Danilo Gallinari (free agent) probably wouldn’t be brought back at that point, or you try a sign-and-trade to get him to a certain destination.”
1 year ago via RealGM

The Oklahoma City Thunder were a somewhat unexpected playoff team in 19-20 after trading away Paul George and Russell Westbrook last offseason. Chris Paul had a resurgent season and the Thunder were one of the best clutch teams in the league. But the Thunder could still begin a more conventional rebuild if they trade away Paul and follow that move by dealing Dennis Schroder and Steven Adams. “By all appearances, once the Thunder make the move to move on from Chris Paul, that’s kind of when they’re going to hit the reset button,” said Royce Young on The Hoop Collective Podcast. “That’s when I think they’ll start tearing down some of the pieces. Schroder will go. Adams might go. And they’ll start to sort of begin their first ever rebuild since they moved to Oklahoma City.”

After three consecutive first-round playoff exits — two with Westbrook and George on the roster together — the Thunder should consider making everyone else available via trade. That doesn’t mean it’s time to make a panic deal involving Adams or Schröder, but their contracts make them the biggest pieces OKC has to make a sweeping change if that’s the route Presti wants to pursue. Despite some struggles against the league’s elite centers this season, Adams remains an excellent defender and valuable pick-and-roll piece. But he’s owed $25 million next season and $27 million in 2020-21, and that might scare off potential trade partners.

Royce Young: Dennis Schroder appears to be excited about his move to OKC. (And if you’re wondering, he spoke with Sam Presti and Billy Donovan before the trade and understands his role will be as a sixth man.)

The Hawks tried to trade Schroder for weeks, but couldn’t find a market for the former first-round draft pick. The need to trade Schroder became obvious when the Hawks obtained two other point guards – first selecting Young in the NBA Draft as the No. 5 overall pick and then trading for veteran Lin. General manager Travis Schlenk declined to comment on what the Lin acquisition meant for Schroder, but it was apparent all three point guards could not remain on the same roster.

Another name that could also be moved? Dennis Schröder. Though Schröder is only 24, he’s not part of the Hawks’ long-term equation with his inconsistent, inefficient performance. However, any move involving Schröder is more likely to happen in the summer. As it stands, teams in need of a point guard may prefer to hold onto cap space for someone like Isaiah Thomas or Elfrid Payton or hope they can land Collin Sexton or Trae Young in the draft. But if they strike out, there will be more suitors in July than there are now.

This season was a rebuilding year for the Hawks, and they knew it. It also is a year in which the Hawks are open to shedding contract dollars. League sources continue to say the asking price on Dennis Schroder is too high to make sense, but the Hawks have at least listened to the idea and are not turning away conversations. There continues to be a sense that Kent Bazemore is available, but again, the asking price seems to be too high to think he’ll get moved, but he is a name to watch as the deadline grows near.

How serious do you think (Hawks GM) Travis Schlenk is about trading Dennis Schroder? And what might those trades look like? Here’s one thing I know about Travis Schlenk: He wants nothing to do with long-term contracts. Schlenk craves flexibility, and his early moves – trading Howard, making little effort to retain Paul Millsap – tell me he’s thinking well into the future. Schroder is a little different though. There’s legitimate talent there, which can’t be dismissed. But more importantly, there is no real market for him. I ran Schroder’s name by a few team executives this week, and each recoiled. There’s a toxicity surrounding Schroder right now. A reputation as a selfish player has gained significant traction throughout the league. His arrest on battery charges last month – an incident the Hawks have deemed “unacceptable” – is an example teams cite of his immaturity. Said a Western Conference executive: “I don’t need that kind of headache.” Perhaps Atlanta could give Schroder away. But at 24, Schroder is a terrific talent. Maybe the Hawks can work with him and hope he matures. Really, they don’t have much of a choice.

Eligible for a rookie extension this summer, Schroder will be a restricted free agent next summer, giving Atlanta the ability to control the free-agency process. Teague, 27, has shown the ability to run the team, but his future is unclear. Teague is still in his prime but is entering the last year of a $32 million contract he signed in 2013. With Teague’s salary ($8 million in 2016-17) likely to double in 2017-18 and Schroder commanding starter money, the situation needs to be addressed sooner rather than later.

The 76ers were prepared to make major changes to their roster to get a coveted point guard at Thursday’s NBA trade deadline. The team offered packages that included shooting guard Nik Stauskas, point guard Ish Smith, a player with an expiring guaranteed contract and a 2016 first-round pick to the Atlanta Hawks for point guard Dennis Schroder, according to multiple league sources. Former Sixer JaKarr Sampson was said to be player with the expiring contract in the deal.
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September 26, 2021 | 6:15 am EDT Update

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: "There’s no room for players who do not want to get vaccinated"

“The NBA should insist that all players and staff are vaccinated or remove them from the team,” NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar tells Rolling Stone. “There is no room for players who are willing to risk the health and lives of their teammates, the staff and the fans simply because they are unable to grasp the seriousness of the situation or do the necessary research. What I find especially disingenuous about the vaccine deniers is their arrogance at disbelieving immunology and other medical experts. Yet, if their child was sick or they themselves needed emergency medical treatment, how quickly would they do exactly what those same experts told them to do?”
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Kyrie Irving following and liking conspiracy theories about COVID-19 vaccines

Irving, who serves as a vice president on the executive committee of the players’ union, recently started following and liking Instagram posts from a conspiracy theorist who claims that “secret societies” are implanting vaccines in a plot to connect Black people to a master computer for “a plan of Satan.” This Moderna microchip misinformation campaign has spread across multiple NBA locker rooms and group chats, according to several of the dozen-plus current players, Hall-of-Famers, league executives, arena workers and virologists interviewed for this story over the past week.
“There are so many other players outside of him who are opting out, I would like to think they would make a way,” says Kyrie’s aunt, Tyki Irving, who runs the seven-time All-Star’s family foundation and is one of the few people in his regular circle of advisors. “It could be like every third game. So it still gives you a full season of being interactive and being on the court, but with the limitations that they’re, of course, oppressing upon you. There can be some sort of formula where the NBA and the players can come to some sort of agreement.”
Storyline: Coronavirus Vaccine

At least 50 NBA players yet to receive a single COVID-19 vaccine dose?

A spokeswoman for Irving declined to respond to a list of questions regarding his vaccination and playing status, and Irving did not immediately respond to a message from Rolling Stone. But as teams return to pre-season training camps next week, fifty to sixty NBA players have yet to receive a single vaccine dose, league sources tell RS. Most are considered merely reluctant skeptics. Some of the holdouts, however, amount to their own shadow roster of anti-vaxxers mounting a behind-the-scenes resistance to Covid protocols — and the truth.
Isaac considers un-vaxxed players to be vilified and bullied, and he thinks “it’s an injustice” to automatically make heroes out of vaccinated celebrities. He rejects the NBA’s proposal for a vaccine mandate and social distancing for players like him during team travel: “You can play on the same court. We can touch the same ball. We can bump chests. We can do all those things on the court. And then when it comes to being on the bus, we have to be in different parts of the bus? To me, it doesn’t seem logically consistent. “If you are vaccinated, in other places you still have to wear the mask regardless. It’s like, ‘OK, then what is the mask necessarily for?’” Isaac continues. “And if Kyrie says that from his position of his executive power in the NBPA, then kudos to him.”
Enes Kanter — the veteran center, devout Muslim and outspoken liberal — senses a creep of the religious right upon his workplace, which just happens to involve players like Isaac sweating all over him and yelling in his face: “If a guy’s not getting vaccinated because of his religion, I feel like we are in a time where the religion and science has to go to together,” he tells RS. “I’ve talked to a lot of religious guys — I’m like: ‘It saves people’s lives, so what is more important than that?’”
Storyline: Coronavirus Vaccine