Storyline: Dwyane Wade Retirement

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What’s next for Wade? More time with his wife, Gabrielle Union-Wade, more time with his son Zaire during his senior season of high school basketball, more moments with his son Zion and more diaper changes with his months-old daughter Kaavia. And more free time in the city he has become forever linked to. “I think kids that are probably 12 or around that age, they think I’m from Miami,” Wade said with a grin. “When I was young, I thought Michael Jordan was from Chicago. That’s a great thing. I definitely think that when you think about Miami, anyone around the world whether it’s sports or not, I think my name comes up.”

In addition to the change of environment and learning how to make adjustments, Dwyane revealed he’s going to start therapy sessions to help him better adapt to a life without playing basketball all the time. “I’ll be in therapy,” he said. “I already told my wife, we need to do it a little bit. I was always against it, someone who doesn’t know me, telling me how to live my life and giving me instructions. I need somebody to talk to about it because it’s a big change and I have a long life to live and there’s other great things I can accomplish. I have no idea what it is yet that I want to do. But, I want to do a little bit of everything. I want to see what I can be great at. I’m so used to being great at something.”

“We’re moving, well not moving, but we’re going to spend more time in L.A. and there’s a few things that I’ve had to make an adjustment to that she’s not used to,” Dwyane said, referring to Gabrielle, in the interview. “I like new sheets on my bed everyday and fresh towels.” “You don’t need it everyday,” Gabrielle responded. “We’re on the black actress salary in L.A. and now that the athlete salary will be joining me in L.A. in more of a full time basis, some of those things I don’t think are necessary every day.”
2 months ago via ESPN

Dwyane Wade, down to what could be the final four games of his career as the Miami Heat’s playoff status remains in flux, says he will seek professional help to deal with life after basketball. In an interview with ESPN’s Rachel Nichols that aired Friday on The Jump, Wade said he has overcome a skeptical attitude and embraced the idea of talking to a clinician. “I’ll be in therapy. Seriously,” Wade said. “I meant it, it is going to be a big change. I told my wife, I said, ‘I need to do therapy, and we need to do a little bit.’”

“The thing I think I will miss the most is the interaction with my teammates in the locker room, the bus rides, the plane rides, the things outside the court,” Wade said at Target Center on Friday, hours before the Heat played the Minnesota Timberwolves. “[On] the court, 20,000 cheering for you, booing you, is incredible and you’re definitely going to miss that, but it’s the locker-room vibe, the friendships, the brotherhood, the bonds that you build with guys in so many walks of life.”

He turned in a solid performance, scoring 16 points to go along with seven rebounds and three assists while helping to lead the Heat to a 100-92 victory over the Knicks on Saturday. “You love playing here,” Wade said. “You hear about it. When I played here in college, I had the opportunity to play here, the coaches versus cancer classic, it was just immediately that feel. That feel was there. Getting the opportunity to come and play in the NBA has just been special.”

For Wade, this is his final year and farewell tour — his “one last dance” — but even he acknowledges that he has the ability to keep playing. “I know I can play a solid two more years, especially in this role that I’m in now,” Wade told The Athletic. “I can play another two, three years, definitely. “People around me want me to keep playing. But I made the decision to say this was my last season and I wanted to walk away the way I’m walking away now and have no regrets about it.”

“He’s done and experienced so much in the league, and he’s been really good as an older guy with all the younger guys in the league, as well,” Durant said. “I think he’s invested so much into basketball, especially physically, that it’s just time to walk away and pursue what’s next in his life. As a hooper from day one, I can appreciate that about D-Wade, especially battling him in the Finals and throughout my whole career. It’s good to see guys go out the way they want to.”
3 months ago via ESPN

As has been custom during Wade’s farewell tour this season, the Heat guard exchanged jerseys with a player from the opposing team. On Sunday, that player was Curry. “It seems like he’s got a lot more in the tank,” Curry said. “That’s what I told him after the game. ‘Are you sure? I know you got a lot of stuff going on off the court with your family and stuff. Are you sure you don’t have a couple more years left in there?’ Obviously, with him going to every road arena one more time, it’s a different energy for sure.”
3 months ago via ESPN

“Everything he has done for that organization, it’s been amazing,” Warriors forward Draymond Green said. “And yet he’s still out there this year playing well. It’s good to see a guy, I think if you looked at D-Wade three years ago, you kind of worried, like, ‘Ahh is it over?’ And he’s battled back from that, and it’s good to see a guy who’s great as D-Wade was close out on a strong note. The way he’s playing this year, it’s great to see him go out like that. You kind of hate to see a guy limp out of the game, and there are some kids that will see some of these older guys and be like, ‘Oh man, he sucked.’ No, if you knew that guy five years ago, like — but that’s just the nature of the business we’re in. However, like I said, I think D-Wade is playing amazing this year. It’s good to see him go out on a high note.”
3 months ago via ESPN

Warriors star Kevin Durant echoed similar sentiments. “I’m not surprised,” he said of Wade’s upcoming retirement. “I wouldn’t be surprised either way if he would have kept playing or if he would have retired. He’s done and experienced so much in this league, and he’s been really good as an older guy with all the younger guys as well. So I think he’s invested so much into basketball spiritually and physically that it’s just time to walk away and pursue what’s next in his life. As a hooper from day one, I can appreciate that about D-Wade, especially battling him in the Finals and throughout my whole career. It’s good to see guys go out the way they want to.”

Right. [Wade had said that he can retire now that Winslow is playing so well.] When you hear that, what did it make you think? Justise Winslow: “I don’t want him to retire, man. To be honest, he’s just a great voice for this team in general. And for me, he sees the drive and the desire to be great for me. I’ve just been everywhere he’s been. Whether it’s a family event he’s having, or a sponsor event. I’m just trying to soak it all in. I’d rather him not retire, but One Last Dance, so… It’s surreal. Even to this day. I think it’s because I’ve played with him but I was telling someone that he’s the second or third best shooting guard of all time. Sometimes I just forget that and think, ‘Oh, he’s just old as ****.’ That sort of thing. But he can still take over games. He can still find his rhythm. He’s so personable and we’re close now, it’s almost just a big brother now. It’s not D-Wade giving back, it’s just my older brother looking out for me.”

“I continue to say, I think I’ve done a pretty good job of trying to adjust my game to my body or my age or the way the game has changed,” Dwyane Wade said. “But also, I tell people, I’m retiring because I want to, not because I physically can’t play the game no more. I think I’ve actually found a pretty good role that if I wanted to stay in it for a while, I think I could do a good job in it in my minutes of coming off the bench and being a spark at different times. But for me, it’s something I want to do. It’s time for me to walk away from the game. It’s not because of a talent standpoint, it’s just that I’ve given it enough. I want to give something else what I’ve given to the game of basketball.”

“I’ve always did things my way,” Wade said in an emotional social-media video that he taped Sunday afternoon and released in the evening. “Whether they’ve good or whether they’ve been bad, I got here because I’ve done things the way I feel is right for me and right for my family. And what I feel is right … I feel it’s right to ask you guys to join me for one last dance, for one last season. “This is it. I’ve given this game everything that I have, and I’m happy about that, and I’m going to give it for one last season.”

It was hardly a guarantee that Wade, a 22.5-point scorer for his career, would return. His decision took months longer than some expected, partly because he was deciding what he wanted to do, partly because he was dealing with some personal business and some family business, and partly because it took him and the Heat some time to figure out what made sense for both sides. A person familiar with Wade’s thinking told The Associated Press that the guard was strongly considering retirement until late last week, when Heat coach Erik Spoelstra and others made a late push to help him decide.

Wade reiterated that the decision has always come down to Heat or retirement. “It’s not a Part B to it,” he said. “I think I’ve been very open and honest to my loved ones and to everybody when I spoke about some of the process. I always said that when I got traded back to Miami, that was it for me. I said it in the first interview and I don’t want to pack my bags to go nowhere. My family’s here, my kid are growing, so definitely if I’m not wearing a Miami Heat jersey next year, I’ll be wearing it under one of my sweaters or jackets.”

The Heat, because of their salary-cap situation, are limited to an offer of either the $2.4 million veteran-minimum salary for 2018-19 or their $5.3 million taxpayer mid-level exception. The Heat are limited beyond that with Wade lacking Bird Rights, having been reacquired at last season’s trading deadline from the Cleveland Cavaliers, after first leaving the Heat for his hometown Chicago Bulls in 2016 free agency following contentious negotiations with the Heat. “You’ve got to call my agent and ask him,” Wade said, when asked if the Heat had extended the maximum possible offer. “I haven’t dealt with the money part of it.”

I am also told by representatives of the club and of the player that Wade being comfortable with his role is critical. He returned last midseason in a bench role, a reserve in all 21 games. He also came off the bench in all five playoffs games. (It would have been four playoff games, but Wade scored 28 points in 26 minutes to give Miami its only postseason win, reminding us what he still is capable of at least in bursts). I have not been told Wade would demand to start. But does he see himself good for more than 25 minutes a game? He mentioned recently that he embraces a mentor’s role for the club’s many young guys still developing, “but you also want to play,” he added. A significant addendum, I thought.

Dwyane Wade again has declined to offer clarity or finality when it comes to his decision about returning to the NBA or Miami Heat. In an interview with the Associated Press that focused on his Wednesday lifetime deal with China-based sporting-apparel manufacturer Li Ning, the Heat’s all-time leading scorer put aside the matter of his NBA future. “When I get back from China, I’ll focus on that,” Wade told the Associated Press. “Right now, I’m focused on the game after basketball. Whatever happens in basketball, it happens. I’ve done everything that I can to this point to put myself that I’m in this position I am today, where I can do something that hasn’t been done globally yet.

“To be here, to be back, to be a part of that, to be a part of leading not only by voice but leading by example, laying it all out on the line with these guys, I felt good about that. I felt good about the Miami Heat whole organization and its future and the kind of players and the kind of people that are in that locker room and in the organization. I was thankful that I could come back and be a part of that.” Asked about retirement, Wade then said, “I’ve given it thought.”

As for Wade, he’s still unsure if he will play this upcoming season. But he’s sure that if he does decide to continue his career, he wants it to be with the Heat. “If I decide to come back and play the game of basketball, I would love for it, obviously, to be in Miami,” Wade said to Mannix and Butler. “It’s just crazy because in this league you never know what will happen. I never thought I would leave Miami. Caron [Butler] knows that I thought I would be here forever, but things happen.”

Union said she believes her husband can still “play two or three more years” during an appearance on The Ringer’s podcast hosted by Larry Wilmore. Along with answering some basketball questions, she also discussed her new film “Breaking In,” her memoir “We’re Going to Need More Wine” and the #MeToo movement. “If it was from what I can see and the way he’s playing — absolutely,” Union said when asked if she believes Wade can still play. “He can play two or three more years with the way he’s playing because his mid-range jumper is nice and he can still get to the basket. “He can absolutely keep playing, but I don’t know if he’s over it.”

The Heat acquired Wade from the Cavaliers in a Feb. 8 trade. He averaged 12.0 points, 3.4 rebounds and 3.1 assists in a bench role in 21 regular-season games with Miami this past season. If Wade does decide to continue his playing career, he said it will be with the Heat. What can Miami offer Wade as it hovers around the luxury tax? Likely just a minimum contract or the exception it gets — either the $5.4 million taxpayer mid-level exception or the $8.8 million mid-level exception.

Dwyane Wade and Udonis Haslem have an important decision to make this summer. Will they continue their playing careers or retire? That decision won’t be made days after the Heat’s season-ending loss in Philadelphia. With a long offseason ahead, the 36-year-old Wade and 37-year-old Haslem will take their time. “We haven’t really thought about it,” Haslem said Friday on exit interview day. “We’re both in situations where we have a lot of different opportunities ahead of us.
1 year ago via ESPN

Dave McMenamin: LeBron James declined to wax poetic about Dwyane Wade’s career before the three-time champion guard announces whether he indeed is retiring this summer after 15 years in the NBA. James did say, however, that he and his former teammate spoke about the possibility of Wade retiring when the Cavs played against Miami late in the season. “Right after the game it was like, ‘If it’s like our last time going against each other, then it’s been everything and more,’” James shared. “But I’ll give you guys a more in-depth analysis of his career (later on) if he decides to hang ‘em up.”
1 year ago via ESPN

About an hour after the final game of his 15th NBA season, Miami Heat star Dwyane Wade acknowledged that he has thought about retiring but said he won’t make a final decision until later in the offseason. “That’s not my focus,” Wade said after the Heat’s season-ending loss to the 76ers on Tuesday. “Fresh off this NBA season, my 15th year, I sit back and think about that. Then I dive and throw myself into my family. They’re next on my bucket list, making sure I’m there for them. And when it comes to the basketball side of it, which is a long time away from now, then I’ll think about that.”

Wade, at 36, hasn’t committed to playing beyond this season, but also hasn’t ruled it out, stressing that such a decision is best left for the offseason. “At the end of the game, we just kind of had that moment like 15 years strong — as brothers, as teammates, as competitors, as teammates again, as competitors again,” James, 33, said, having entered the NBA together as lottery picks in 2003. But our brotherhood is beyond this game of basketball. You just don’t take for granted. You just don’t know. We’ll see what happens in the summer.”

Dwyane Wade retiring at the end of the season?

Wade, 36, told me in recent days that for the first time in his career, he is genuinely undecided whether he wants to play beyond this season. Wade has said that he will only play for the Heat, if he continues his career beyond this season. “I don’t know,” Wade said. “I have told everybody around me that I am taking it after this season and go from there. It’s the first year I’ve ever went into the summer with that mind-set. I always went into it as a free agent or opting out of a deal to get another deal. This is the first summer I can say I’m just going into the summer and see how I feel and see the position this organization is in and go from there. I’m not really concerned with it, honestly. I’m cool with whatever I decide to do. It will be my decision.”

“[Udonis Haslem] always talked about, as you get older, you take it year by year. But this is the first summer that I will go into the summer and say I ain’t got much hair left, but I’m going to let my hair down and look at everything as a whole, my family and basketball. Being back here helps that situation for me, makes the decision even easier since now that I’m back already. And sit down with Pat [Riley] and Micky [Arison] and everybody and see what’s best for me and go from there.” If Wade agrees to play for the minimum $2.4 million season, only $1.5 million would count against the salary cap. It’s possible, though less likely, that Miami would give Wade a chunk of its salary cap exception — either a $5.5 million taxpayer midlevel exception next summer or a full $8.8 million midlevel exception depending on whether Miami is a tax team.
1 year ago via Uproxx

Since Wade is a legend, it’s fair to wonder if the franchise will do anything to celebrate him during his final game. While it may, Wade made it clear in a conversation with ESPN that the one thing he does not want is a massive retirement tour, a la the one Kobe Bryant (who Wade has talked to about such an event) had during his final season with the Lakers. “I talked to Kobe about that,” Wade said. “He was like ‘It was exhausting. As flattering as it was, it was very exhausting as well.’ I’m not a narcissist like that, I don’t think I need … not calling Kobe a narcissist, he earned that and he needed that. I can’t set out and say ‘I want a farewell tour like Kobe Bryant.’ That’s not who I am. When the time come, and I don’t really talk about it because it’s not here yet, but when the time comes, I’ll announce it in my own D-Wade fashion, the way that I do.”

At 35, Wade said it is only logical to take his career at this stage year by year. “That’s the way I approach it, even if I’m on a contract for two years, that’s how I approached it,” he said. “As me and [Heat captain and close friend] Udonis [Haslem] both talked about for many years and I think we got it from Ray Allen, about knowing that time is going to come for you. Don’t have a perceived notion that I’m retiring at this age, ‘I’m retiring at this year.’ Play the game year after year, see how you feel, and see what you want to do the following year.”
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May 26, 2019 | 6:44 pm EDT Update
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Much of the NBA Finals chatter will be about what takes place after the series because the matchup features three of the top pending free agents in Leonard, Kevin Durant and Klay Thompson. “I can’t get into other free agents and other teams, but for Kawhi, he’s going to take it one day and one game at a time,” Robertson told Yahoo Sports. “We have a championship opportunity in front of us. We’re not thinking about free agency; it’s the Warriors [right now]. Once we get through the season, we’ll turn our attention to free agency. But we’re just having fun right now. This has been a great year.”