Storyline: Evan Fournier Injury

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However, Fournier felt lingering soreness in his foot on Saturday night and Sunday morning, causing him to be scratched from the game against the Raptors. Fournier, who missed five games at the end of December and the beginning of January before returning for five mostly hobbled games, is walking the fine line of wanting to be back as soon as possible and not wanting to return too soon as to re-aggravate the injury. “I definitely don’t want to do the same thing that I did two or three weeks ago and if I’m going to come back, I want to come for good and not just for a week or two,’’ said Fournier, whose foot was wrapped in ice following Saturday’s two-hour practice. “To be honest, it’s not that complicated because I just have to listen to my body. If I’m sore I’ll tell the training staff and we’ll go from there. It’s all about listening to my body.’’

Magic coach Frank Vogel said there is a temptation to get Fournier back on the floor as soon as possible, but the team also wants him to fully recover from his injury this time around. Vogel started veteran C.J. Watson a second consecutive game in place of the injured Fournier on Sunday. “It’s a fine line and (Fournier’s desire to return) probably does work against him,’’ Vogel said. “We want this to be put behind him. We don’t want him to play a couple and then have to sit another two weeks, play a couple and have to sit. Hopefully when we get him back this time it’s behind him.’’

The Orlando Magic will be without their leading scorer, Evan Fournier, for the foreseeable future. Fournier aggravated the same right-heel bruise that forced him to miss five consecutive games from Dec. 23-Jan. 2, and he did not play when the Magic faced the Utah Jazz on Saturday night at Vivint Smart Home Arena. Although there is no timetable for Fournier’s return, it seems highly unlikely that he will play in either of the remaining games on the Magic’s road trip, which ends on Wednesday. “I was compensating a lot, so now it’s more than just the heel,” Fournier said. “It’s just the bottom of the foot, period. It’s frustrating, man. I could probably keep playing like this, but it’s not getting any better and I’m playing [at] like 60 percent [of my ability].”
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July 17, 2018 | 10:32 am EDT Update
According to sources, Okafor, the No. 3 pick in the 2015 NBA Draft, worked out for four teams last Wednesday in Las Vegas, and remains hopeful of signing with a team ahead of training camp next fall. Okafor averaged 17.5 points per game as a rookie in Philadelphia in 2015-16. He has spent the last few months working out in Miami with trainers David Alexander and Idan Ravin, fueling speculation that he could land with the Heat, especially if Miami finds a trading partner for Hassan Whiteside.
Storyline: Jahlil Okafor Free Agency
These are the real boys of summer, the grinders using the 12-day audition in the desert to impress NBA executives enough to earn the honor of an invitation to training camp. Take Cooley, 27, the unofficial dean of NBA Summer League stars. This is Cooley’s sixth stint in Vegas. He’s a member of the Phoenix Suns now, a teammate of Ayton’s. Before that he was a Sacramento King, setting screens for De’Aaron Fox, and before that a Cleveland Cavalier, throwing outlet passes to Andrew Wiggins. For Cooley, this was never a dream. In 2009, he chose Notre Dame, not for a springboard to the NBA, but because it had a top business school. “I used basketball to get the best education,” Cooley said.
Storyline: Jack Cooley Free Agency
There’s Justin Harper, with the New York Knicks. Casper Ware, with the Portland Trail Blazers. Brady Heslip with the Memphis Grizzlies. There are no paychecks for playing in Summer League. There’s per diem, around $100 per day. There’s a hotel room, two-hour practices, daily bus rides and no guarantee of playing time. “It’s a grind, man,” Machado said. “Every time you come out to Summer League, everyone is trying to prove themselves. Me, trying to facilitate, sometimes you overthink it. Every time you come back, you think, ‘Man I did this already.’ It’s a constant grind and constant pressure you put on yourself.”
As Summer League winds down, most of the boys of summer will disperse. Some will sign on with G League teams, to maximize exposure. Others will ink European contracts, where the money is better. They will ride buses to small towns in the U.S. or live in isolation in far-flung cities around the world. They will do it, and they will hope for an invitation back to Las Vegas next summer, for the opportunity to impress once again. “There’s only about 1% of me that thinks about not playing,” Cooley said. “This life is pretty intense. But I love it, I’m glad it’s not easy. Not playing would be a terrible itch that I wouldn’t be able to scratch. I know once the time comes, I will definitely be a part of the game, because I’ll go crazy if I go cold-turkey out of basketball. But right now, I’m a player. The body of work I have put together has caused a pretty good stir here. I believe I’m an NBA player. I believe I can play in the league for a long time.”
Storyline: Jack Cooley Free Agency