Storyline: Furkan Korkmaz to Sixers?

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The question is much more financial in nature, though, with a buyout of $2 million that the combination of the Sixers’ max allowed contribution ($675k) + Korkmaz’s rookie scale contract (~$1.2m max) is unlikely to reach. This is part of the reason that Korkmaz fell, because once he fell beyond a certain point in the draft (and, thus, his max earning potential fell thanks to first round picks being under a scale) you had to be willing to commit to stashing him overseas for a couple of years. Perhaps Efes might be willing to renegotiate his buyout, but short of that his presence in Philadelphia for the 2017-18 season is unlikely, in my opinion.

Furkan Korkmaz, similar to Dario Saric’s situation last year, has a buyout in his contract playing professional basketball in his native Turkey that would allow him to join the NBA. But, unlike Saric, who was the No. 12 pick in the 2014 NBA Draft, Korkmaz went No. 26 in 2016. That means a great deal because Korkmaz’s slotted NBA salary in the 2017-18 season would be $1.22 million. Saric’s, meanwhile, was $2.32 million during his recently completed rookie year with the Sixers after spending two seasons with Anadolu Efes in Istanbul. Since the league limits how much every team can contribute toward a buyout, it might not be financially feasible for the 19-year-old Korkmaz to join the Sixers now.

Colangelo attended Tuesday’s EuroLeague playoff game between Baskonia Vitoria Gasteiz and CSKA Moscow in Vitoria, Spain. CSKA’s roster includes Serbian standout Milos Teodosic, a 6-foot-5 point guard whom ESPN analyst Fran Fraschilla calls the best passer in the world. In addition to scouting talent, Colangelo will watch shooting guard Furkan Korkmaz play in the Basketball Champions League semifinals on Friday and Sunday in Tenerife, Spain. The Sixers selected Korkmaz with the 26th overall pick in the 2016 draft. The Turkish player remained in Europe because he could not get out of his contract with Anadolu Efes of the Turkish Super Basketball League.
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May 24, 2018 | 11:39 am EDT Update
North Carolina forward Luke Maye has announced he will withdraw from the NBA draft. In a message posted on his Instagram account Thursday morning, Maye said that he would be returning to UNC next season. “I have had a great experience learning from the NBA process and growing as a basketball player during the past couple weeks,” Maye wrote. “Through this process, I have decided that I am going to comeback (sic) to school to improve as a player and finish my college career.”
Corporate sponsors spent an estimated $1.12 billion on the NBA this season, fueled by the new sponsorship patches on team jerseys. That figure comes from IEG/ESP, a division of ad agency WPP that tracks sponsor spending and ROI on the major US sports leagues. This is the first time NBA sponsor spend has topped $1 billion. For comparison, it puts the NBA between MLB ($892 million) and the NFL ($1.25 billion) in sponsorship spend. The $1.12 billion is 31% higher than the $861 million in NBA sponsor spend last season, a much bigger increase than was projected. Sponsorship spend in the big four pro leagues typically gets bigger every year, but the NBA spend grew by far more than expected.
The jersey patches only account for $137 million of this year’s total, IEG/ESP says. That’s a small chunk of the $1.12 billion, but it’s $137 million that is entirely new this season, since the patches are new. The average patch deal pays a team $6.5 million per year, and most are two-year deals. The lion’s share of the $1.12 billion comes from league-level sponsors: big blue-chip consumer brands like Anheuser-Busch InBev, American Express, Frito-Lay and Gatorade (both part of PepsiCo), Nike, and State Farm, which IEG/ESP says is the No. 1 most active NBA sponsor. “Our partners continue to activate with us at extraordinary levels and integrate into our platforms year-round,” says the NBA’s SVP of global partnerships Kerry Tatlock.
Storyline: Jersey Ads