Storyline: G League Signings

291 rumors in this storyline

More Rumors in this Storyline

Scott Roth: “It’s tougher than the NBA, tougher than Europe. There’s just so many things constantly going on down here. You got a bunch of guys with a bunch of different agendas, you’ve got agents telling guys what they want, you got teams telling them what they want. And so you’re going to get a 17, 18-year old kid and throw them in this environment with 26, 27-year old men who have a different agenda and try to manage a kid, and it’s already hard enough to manage young kids with one year of college experience.”

McDonald’s All American and Syracuse commit Darius Bazley — a projected top-10 selection in the 2019 NBA draft — has decided to turn professional and plans to sign in the NBA G League, Bazley told Yahoo Sports. Bazley, 17, told Yahoo Sports he has decommitted from Syracuse and will play in the G League after discussing several options with his mother, Lynnita Bazley, close family members and Princeton (Cincinnati) High School coach Steve Wright. Several players have set a trend of leaving collegiate commitments to play overseas, but Bazley’s decision to bypass the one-and-done format for the G League is unprecedented.

“This is a life-changing decision,” Bazley, one of the top players in the Class of 2018, told Yahoo Sports. “I put a lot of thinking into this with my mom and close circle, especially sitting down with her. It’s just like making the decision to which college you want to go to. Me and her did some talking, and I prayed on it. I talked to my high school coach, Steve, who played overseas, and then I talked to a couple of guys in the G League who have experience. Ultimately, playing professional basketball has always been my dream. It’s always going to be the dream goal, always going to be the goal until I achieve it. This is going to put me one step closer to doing so.

“The G League will have the most to offer, considering that is the development league for the NBA,” he continued. “I will get more out of that than going overseas. The G League is the closest thing to the NBA. I see most guys now are spending time in the G League even after they went to school and the draft, so this gives me the chance to accelerate the process. There have been a lot of successful guys who have been brought up in the G League, and I’m confident that I will be one of them. I’m self-motivated because I know this is what I want to do for the rest of my life. This is how I want to make a living. This is how I want to provide for my family, and provide for my love of basketball. I’m not playing any games with this. I’m attacking this straight forward. I’m not maneuvering around this, take any side steps. I’m taking this head on. This is the decision that I made, and I know it will work. I know what I’m capable of doing, and I’m going to do just that.”

Some NBA players are taking the D-League route, like Ben Gordon. Charlie Villanueva: Which is crazy. Yeah, we’re talking about Ben Gordon. Charlie Villanueva: Ben is a tremendous player, his whole NBA career speaks for itself. We won a college championship together, played together in Detroit with the Pistons for years. But that’s one of the reasons when I look at that situation, I’m like ‘Wow, Ben Gordon went to the D-League!’ That’s amazing, that’s a big deal. If he could do it, how can I not do it? He’s working his way up trying to get an NBA job. So I don’t mind doing the same thing. That kind of inspired me a little bit. The D-League is a possibility. Whatever it takes. I want to play.
More HoopsHype Rumors
February 19, 2019 | 2:40 pm EST Update
Though it’s not unusual for an athlete to have a late-career surge, the reason for McGee’s is: his began when he gave up meat. “I was in Dallas and I had gained weight and knew becoming a vegetarian was the quickest way to lose it,” he said. “I just wasn’t sure if I could do it.” It was 2015, and he was a bench player for the Mavericks struggling to find minutes. A trip to Whole Foods led to his discovery of a plant-based culinary company by the name of Beyond Meat — and with it, renewed energy.
Irving said he mentioned his diet change during an interview at the beginning of last season, and Beyond Meat offered to send him samples. “I was noticing that I wasn’t able to recover as fast after games and workouts,” he said. “I did a lot of research and learned that my diet could be a factor. “It was good timing as I was struggling to find quality plant-based foods that still had a lot of flavor.” But can he and other NBA evangelists really get people to grill tasty sunflower seeds instead of ground beef? “Not only do I think it will be a permanent change among athletes,” Irving said, “but I think we will see people who aren’t professional athletes making the change as well.”
This is the square footage, among the disconnected and the disenfranchised and those being odd for effect mixed with those who are effectually odd, this is where Supreme Bey chooses to meet. “I love it here because everyone is so f—— weird,’’ says the man more commonly known as Chris Douglas-Roberts. “It’s the only place that no one stares at me.’’ As he sits down on a white sectional inside the relatively simplistic Cadillac Hotel, he is 11 years and a lifetime of self-discovery removed from the player who helped Memphis reach the Final Four in 2008. Now 32, he has bobbed-length dreads with gold tips and a full-mouthed diamond grill, and he wears both a black warmup jacket and black loafers with his DCTG (Don’t Cheat The Grind). A pair of bright socks peek out of his pants, Michael Jackson-Billie Jean video style, and black sunglasses shade his eyes, even as nightfall sets in.
Now here are the particulars. DCTG Sportswear is a trademarked brand, and you can buy the clothes online. Supreme says he has factories in Pakistan and China to mass-produce the apparel. He likes to keep supply low in order to ratchet up demand, but he also is the first to say that this is mostly a hobby. Raven, who played at Memphis, sketches her designs but is also just getting her line off the ground. The model, Mason, did sign a deal with APM, a boutique agency in New York, and Supreme did negotiate the contract. But Mason is not, technically, a supermodel. His foundation will focus on families in need in Memphis, but he’s only just returned there to get that started. As for the sports agency, he has eyes on a few players he’d love to represent. They just don’t know it yet.