NBA Rumor: James Ennis Free Agency

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The Orlando Magic have re-signed free agent forward James Ennis III, President of Basketball Operations Jeff Weltman announced today. Per team policy, terms of the deal are not disclosed. Ennis (6’6”, 215, 7/1/90) played in 69 games (18 starts) last season with both Philadelphia and Orlando, averaging 6.6 ppg. and 3.6 rpg. in 18.3 minpg. He was acquired by the Magic on Feb. 6 from Philadelphia in exchange for a 2020 second round draft pick. Ennis appeared in 20 games (18 starts) with Orlando, averaging 8.4 ppg., 4.8 rpg. and 1.1 apg. in 24.5 minpg. He scored in double figures 16 times (eight times with Orlando) and 20+ points once, including a season-high 20 points on Nov. 29 @ New York. Ennis also played and started in five playoff outings, averaging 7.0 ppg., 5.8 rpg., 1.2 apg. and 1.00 stlpg. in 23.8 minpg.

Analysis: As the Magic’s roster stands now, Ennis would enter the 2020-21 season as the team’s starting small forward. That would seem like an enticing opportunity — and perhaps an opportunity to enhance his value for the 2021-22 season. I don’t think he would garner a guaranteed multiyear offer elsewhere or a deal for the upcoming season above the veteran’s minimum. Odds he returns: 60 percent

Stefanski said the team’s own free agents, power forward Anthony Tolliver and small forward James Ennis, are on their list. “We like both players,” Stefanski said. “I was with James in Memphis. Anthony Tolliver — the people in Detroit, teammates and everybody — loves the guy, so they’re still in play. It’s all going to depend what kind of money is out there and the demand for both those players. More I’d say the ball’s in their court than ours.”
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October 20, 2021 | 1:37 pm EDT Update
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