Storyline: Jeremy Lin Injury

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Lin said he’ll progress to 3-on-3 and 5-on-5, but couldn’t offer dates. His progress, Lin said, is defined by how he feels each step of the way back… literally. Lin has also said he’s not yet satisfied with his level of explosiveness. “A lot of it is really just seeing how it feels week to week,” said Lin. “As long as there’s no issues, then keep going forward. I honestly don’t even know dates. We don’t try to put dates on it because there’s no rush back. “It’s more just stay at a place where you’re really comfortable, knee’s doing well and you can keep adding time, intensity, playing for longer amounts of time, play for longer stretches of time. Maybe I play three stretches today. I might build up and play longer stretches, five stretches. There’s a process that goes into it. As long as I progress and feel good, we’ll keep building up.”

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While Lin is lighter and his knee is healthy, his lengthy rehab at Vancouver’s Fortius Sport & Health included extensive kinesiology work, remaking the way he moves. That’s an ongoing process. “I haven’t played in a long time, so it’s not like you come back and you’re better than you were before. It’s going to take a lot of time. My body’s not used to moving fast or playing against contact so that takes [time],” Lin said. “Having a year where you’re out, you don’t get that in four weeks. It takes a lot of time, which is why we’re going to keep building up and stay with the plan, try to not get too frustrated if I’m not moving the way I want or I’m not as explosive as I want.

In an interview with Taiwanese media on June 2, Lin praised the organization, saying “90 to 95 percent” of the NBA’s other teams wouldn’t have gone the extra mile the Nets did. He detailed just what the Nets had done for him. “I know I am blessed so much,” said Lin talking about the Nets organization. “The Nets have supported me so much. For my rehab in Vancouver, the car, accommodations, air fare, advanced rehab therapeutics were all paid by the Nets. They also had conferencing with Fortius weekly to set the rehab plans together. I will return to Vancouver first when back from Asia. It’s the Nets who asked me to go back there to check my knee.”

After working with Fortius Sport & Health sports physiotherapist Ryan Murray and strength and conditioning coach Daniel Kenzie in Burnaby, British Columbia, Lin is taking a holistic approach to his body and is remaking his entire game. “I’m not just looking at whether my knee will hold up,” Lin says. “I’m looking at whether I have done enough to completely change preexisting movement patterns. Everything down to my shot, the way I run, the way I defend, the way I move, cut, accelerate, decelerate, everything will look – it won’t look to the eye, or on TV any different – but it will be very different in terms of how I do it, and where I move from and what muscles I’m using and what tendons and joints I’m not using. I definitely learned more about science and anatomy than I ever thought I would. But I’m excited, and I feel like I’m moving better and it’s going to help my game.”

Lin had to learn how to walk again, jog, run, cut and jump, essentially reprogramming his muscle memory. Several exercises included movement with a resistance band to help Lin perform basketball techniques on the court better such as a step-back jumper and gaining balance off the dribble quicker. Lin also did water aerobics and received acupuncture treatment as part of his rehab, according to social media postings. Now, Lin is running, jumping, cutting and shooting (with minor shot adjustments after changing the positioning of his feet). The next step in his comeback is absorbing contact. “It’s going to make me better, it’s going to make me faster, make me more efficient,” Lin says. “The only hard part is I have to, effectively, undo 29 years of movement; that’s the hardest part.”

As for his injury, Jeremy Lin disclosed that his surgery to repair his ruptured patella tendon had an additional benefit. “They say I’ll even be better because before, I was dealing with knee pain, but now that they’ve gone in and cleaned everything up, I’ll feel even better than before and there’s no residual anything,” he said in an apparent reference to the Nets medical staff. He also told Lowe that he feels lucky in one regard. “If you’re going to choose one of the big-time injures, this is a great one to have,” he said with a laugh.

In Jeremy Lin’s first interview with local media since suffering a season-ending knee injury in the Nets’ opener, the guard said he will be back for training camp and back playing the same style. And that style will be better, Lin said, after he essentially will have taken a year off to retrain his body how to move. “You talking about training camp? Shoot. If I am not, there’s issues,” said Lin, backing the widely held assumption he will opt in for the final season, worth $12 million, on his three-year contract.

The Nets decision to send Jeremy Lin to a British Columbia sports institute for a season-long rehab was “collaborative,” Kenny Atkinson told reporters Friday afternoon. “It’s was a collaborative effort from Sean (Marks) and I, our performance team, and the group in Vancouver – plus Jeremy’s group too,” Atkinson said after practice on Friday afternoon. “It was a collaborative decision. We are monitoring it and we just want everyone to make sure that we are on top of it daily, in contact with the people in Vancouver. The coaches are in contact with Jeremy, I’m in contact with Jeremy all the time. Collaboratively, we felt like it was the best place to get this thing done.”

In an Instagram message posted Thursday afternoon, Jeremy Lin announced that he’ll spend most of the season at a suburban Vancouver sports training institute, hoping to “rebuild my body from the ground up.” Lin’s message to his fans was short and without much detail…”The Nets and IO have decided on a really comprehensive rehab program that will have me out here most of the season. The goal is to rebuild my body from the ground up, each and every muscle and joint, not just the patella tendon. I can’t wait to get healthy. come back even stronger.”


In an thank you note posted to a Chinese website, We Chat, Jeremy Lin admits that he is still physically and mentally hurting … but already preparing to return to the NBA, working with the Nets and his personal trainer. Jeremy Lin: “Now that I’ve come out of [being] wounded, scared, I can honestly say that God has given me great peace and joy. Do not get me wrong, I’m really hurt and broken hearted. Nobody cares more about my career than I do. Although I put so much energy into basketball last year, I could only play 36 games, then played only one game this year. But sometimes life is like that, even if we do a hundred percent of the preparation, we may not always get what we want.”

Lin suffered a right-knee injury late in Wednesday’s 140-131 season-opening loss to the Pacers at Bankers Life Fieldhouse. Despite the defeat, the only image anybody will remember is the sight of Lin clutching his knee in tears. “He’s getting examined. We’ll know more [Thursday],” Nets coach Kenny Atkinson said of Lin, who traveled back to New York with the team. “Definitely tough,” power forward Trevor Booker said. “He battled through injuries last year. To see him go down the first game, it has to be tough for him. So you can only feel for him.”

When Jeremy Lin landed awkwardly on his ankle during Sunday’s game against the Mavericks, he couldn’t help but think the worst. After all, that’s the way his nightmarish, injury-riddled season has gone since it began, with Lin playing in just 25 of the Nets’ 69 games after signing a three-year, $36 million deal in the summer. “It’s the story of my season,” said Lin, who is averaging 13.7 points and 4.9 assists when he does play. “Every time we’re about to hit our stride, get into a rhythm or we start to figure things out, something’s happened.”

“He did pretty much everything, even a little extra afterwards, played a little full-court,’’ Nets coach Kenny Atkinson said. “He’s going to get that 10-day All-Star period to get his rhythm, get in better shape, work on his cardio. So, good news. He looked good, shot the ball well. His conditioning he’s got to work on a little bit. It’s a little different than being on a bike or a treadmill. We’ve got to see the minutes [in Denver], how that looks, the gradual buildup. … I’m not sure exactly what that minutes restriction is going to look like or if there’ll be one.”

Jeremy Lin out at least three more weeks

The following statement has been released by Brooklyn Nets General Manager Sean Marks: “During the course of his rehab, Jeremy re-aggravated his strained left hamstring and will be out approximately three to five weeks as he continues to work towards a full recovery. We understand and appreciate Jeremy’s competitive desire to get back on the court with his teammates, however, we are going to be cautious with his rehab in order to ensure that he is at full strength once he returns.”

Jeremy Lin back soon?

In a Chinese-language interview, Lin said he finally hopes to play again in a week or two, and that if it were up to him, he’d be on the court already “I love Jeremy’s competitiveness. That’s Jeremy being competitive, that’s him wanting to be out there to help his teammates,” coach Kenny Atkinson said before the Nets lost their eighth straight, 104-95, to the Pelicans at Barclays Center on Thursday night. “That’s the way I look at it. We’ll continue to evaluate [him]. He’s progressing nicely.

Nets point guard Jeremy Lin – in a Chinese-language interview – said he finally hopes to be playing again for Brooklyn in a week or two, and that if it were up to him he’d be back out on the court already. Lin has missed 25 of the Nets’ 37 games, and has already been ruled out of Thursday night’s tilt against New Orleans. While Brooklyn has declined to give any sort of tangible update on his progress, he spoke with CCTVNBAPrimeTime in Chinese, and the quotes were taken from closed caption translations. “It’s OK. It’s progressing gradually,” said Lin. “I think the recovery is faster than last time.”

Lin added that he’s undergoing tests daily on the hamstring. “We have different tests every day. So those include evaluating my muscle strength, getting an X-ray, MRI (exam),’’ said Lin, adding that he carries an instrument that records data on his injury and progress. He said the performance team will base his return more on empirical date than how he his feeling. “Impossible. If it depending on my feeling, now I (would be playing),” Lin said.

Jeremy Lin has taken the next step toward his return. Friday afternoon, for the first time since suffering a strained hamstring Nov. 2, Lin was back at practice. During the 37-day hiatus, the Nets have used a host of different players in the point guard position with limited success, contributing to the team’s struggles. “He’s not going to play [Saturday at San Antonio]. That’s his first practice in a while,” Nets coach Kenny Atkinson said. “He looked good. He was out there making good passes and moving well.”

But Lin got forced out of the game with a hamstring injury with the Nets leading 64-55 and 2:14 left in the opening half. Coach Kenny Atkinson had no update on the injury’s severity, and wasn’t even sure how it happened. And while any lengthy Lin absence would be catastrophic — the Nets are already without Greivis Vasquez, Randy Foye and Caris LeVert — they had enough to hold on against Detroit (3-2). “Obviously it’s tough to be there without J-Lin,” Lopez said. “We’re confident he’ll be all right. “But it was great to see the guys stick together, playing within themselves and just trust each other. That’s where we’re going to find our true strength and that’s what’s going to make us a great team.”
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July 17, 2018 | 10:32 am EDT Update
According to sources, Okafor, the No. 3 pick in the 2015 NBA Draft, worked out for four teams last Wednesday in Las Vegas, and remains hopeful of signing with a team ahead of training camp next fall. Okafor averaged 17.5 points per game as a rookie in Philadelphia in 2015-16. He has spent the last few months working out in Miami with trainers David Alexander and Idan Ravin, fueling speculation that he could land with the Heat, especially if Miami finds a trading partner for Hassan Whiteside.
Storyline: Jahlil Okafor Free Agency
These are the real boys of summer, the grinders using the 12-day audition in the desert to impress NBA executives enough to earn the honor of an invitation to training camp. Take Cooley, 27, the unofficial dean of NBA Summer League stars. This is Cooley’s sixth stint in Vegas. He’s a member of the Phoenix Suns now, a teammate of Ayton’s. Before that he was a Sacramento King, setting screens for De’Aaron Fox, and before that a Cleveland Cavalier, throwing outlet passes to Andrew Wiggins. For Cooley, this was never a dream. In 2009, he chose Notre Dame, not for a springboard to the NBA, but because it had a top business school. “I used basketball to get the best education,” Cooley said.
Storyline: Jack Cooley Free Agency
There’s Justin Harper, with the New York Knicks. Casper Ware, with the Portland Trail Blazers. Brady Heslip with the Memphis Grizzlies. There are no paychecks for playing in Summer League. There’s per diem, around $100 per day. There’s a hotel room, two-hour practices, daily bus rides and no guarantee of playing time. “It’s a grind, man,” Machado said. “Every time you come out to Summer League, everyone is trying to prove themselves. Me, trying to facilitate, sometimes you overthink it. Every time you come back, you think, ‘Man I did this already.’ It’s a constant grind and constant pressure you put on yourself.”
As Summer League winds down, most of the boys of summer will disperse. Some will sign on with G League teams, to maximize exposure. Others will ink European contracts, where the money is better. They will ride buses to small towns in the U.S. or live in isolation in far-flung cities around the world. They will do it, and they will hope for an invitation back to Las Vegas next summer, for the opportunity to impress once again. “There’s only about 1% of me that thinks about not playing,” Cooley said. “This life is pretty intense. But I love it, I’m glad it’s not easy. Not playing would be a terrible itch that I wouldn’t be able to scratch. I know once the time comes, I will definitely be a part of the game, because I’ll go crazy if I go cold-turkey out of basketball. But right now, I’m a player. The body of work I have put together has caused a pretty good stir here. I believe I’m an NBA player. I believe I can play in the league for a long time.”
Storyline: Jack Cooley Free Agency