Storyline: Jerryd Bayless Injury

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Jerryd Bayless out for the season

The Philadelphia 76ers announced that guard Jerryd Bayless underwent successful surgery this morning to repair a torn ligament in his left wrist, which will be immobilized for the next 12 weeks. The surgery was performed by Dr. Michelle Carlson of the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City. “While it’s unfortunate Jerryd will miss the remainder of the season, we feel confident that today’s procedure will resolve his wrist injury and related discomfort,” said Sixers President of Basketball Operations Bryan Colangelo. “Jerryd is to be credited with his committed and professional approach in making every effort to avoid this outcome.”

“It’s not doom and gloom,” Brett Brown told Keith Pompey of the Philadelphia Inquirer. “Ben (Simmons) is coming back in January. We are still trying to find information on Jerryd [Bayless]. Jahlil [Okafor] is still trying to touch the court in his first preseason game.” Simmons had surgery to repair the fracture on October 4th. January 3rd would be 13 weeks post-surgery, which is close to the 10-12 week timeline orthopedic surgeon Daniel Cuttica explained as a typical recovery timeline for Simmons’ injury.

It appears that Jerryd Bayless’ left wrist is worse that the 76ers had originally expected. The point guard had an MRI on Wednesday, and the test results weren’t favorable. The Sixers have been hush on the details, saying that it will make announcement in the near future. Bayless said Thursday night that he wasn’t sure what was wrong. But … “It’s not the best right now,” Bayless said. Asked if he would miss the games at the start of the season, he responded “Yeah, I might.” Bayless missed his second preseason game Thursday with what the team has labeled as sore wrist.
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February 19, 2019 | 2:25 pm EST Update
Though it’s not unusual for an athlete to have a late-career surge, the reason for McGee’s is: his began when he gave up meat. “I was in Dallas and I had gained weight and knew becoming a vegetarian was the quickest way to lose it,” he said. “I just wasn’t sure if I could do it.” It was 2015, and he was a bench player for the Mavericks struggling to find minutes. A trip to Whole Foods led to his discovery of a plant-based culinary company by the name of Beyond Meat — and with it, renewed energy.
Irving said he mentioned his diet change during an interview at the beginning of last season, and Beyond Meat offered to send him samples. “I was noticing that I wasn’t able to recover as fast after games and workouts,” he said. “I did a lot of research and learned that my diet could be a factor. “It was good timing as I was struggling to find quality plant-based foods that still had a lot of flavor.” But can he and other NBA evangelists really get people to grill tasty sunflower seeds instead of ground beef? “Not only do I think it will be a permanent change among athletes,” Irving said, “but I think we will see people who aren’t professional athletes making the change as well.”
This is the square footage, among the disconnected and the disenfranchised and those being odd for effect mixed with those who are effectually odd, this is where Supreme Bey chooses to meet. “I love it here because everyone is so f—— weird,’’ says the man more commonly known as Chris Douglas-Roberts. “It’s the only place that no one stares at me.’’ As he sits down on a white sectional inside the relatively simplistic Cadillac Hotel, he is 11 years and a lifetime of self-discovery removed from the player who helped Memphis reach the Final Four in 2008. Now 32, he has bobbed-length dreads with gold tips and a full-mouthed diamond grill, and he wears both a black warmup jacket and black loafers with his DCTG (Don’t Cheat The Grind). A pair of bright socks peek out of his pants, Michael Jackson-Billie Jean video style, and black sunglasses shade his eyes, even as nightfall sets in.
Now here are the particulars. DCTG Sportswear is a trademarked brand, and you can buy the clothes online. Supreme says he has factories in Pakistan and China to mass-produce the apparel. He likes to keep supply low in order to ratchet up demand, but he also is the first to say that this is mostly a hobby. Raven, who played at Memphis, sketches her designs but is also just getting her line off the ground. The model, Mason, did sign a deal with APM, a boutique agency in New York, and Supreme did negotiate the contract. But Mason is not, technically, a supermodel. His foundation will focus on families in need in Memphis, but he’s only just returned there to get that started. As for the sports agency, he has eyes on a few players he’d love to represent. They just don’t know it yet.
Perdue: I think one of the reasons why we won the championship that season, if not the main reason, was that we stayed together. We would meet four or five times a week at this health club in San Antonio during the lockout and hold team workouts. We would work out and then go to the gym next door and much like a practice go through drills, work on things in the half court. Then we would play four-on-four or five-on-five, and it wasn’t like we were just running up and down the floor. It was competitive. It would be like, “Hey, it’s getting a little ragged, let’s take a break and come back.”
In 1997-98, Skybox produced a 123-card metal basketball insert issue in addition to its base set. The first ten of each the 100 serially printed cards had an emerald green background. One of them featured Michael Jordan. The Precious Metal Gems Green (PMG) cards came in packs costing a few dollars. For a decade, no one except a few diehards paid much attention. “Initially, the cards were no more popular than other basketball inserts of the era, but that changed about ten years ago when the set became sort of a cult favorite,” notes Rich Mueller in Sports Collectors Daily.