NBA Rumor: Jose Juan Barea Free Agency

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Barea has long been the subject of discussion in regard to joining the Mavs as a staffer or coach, in part because he was valuable in helping Luka Doncic make the off-the-court transition to America and the NBA. But the 36-year-old said on that retirement day, “I want to make sure everybody knows I want to play. Anything could happen this year, with the COVID, injuries. I might be back here in Dallas playing. I’ve seen it all in the NBA. I’ve seen some crazy stuff.”

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I saw you signed with Cangrejeros de Santurce in Puerto Rico earlier this week. How did that come about and why did you feel like that’s a good next opportunity for you? J.J. Barea: “Long story short, that same summer that I signed with the Mavericks, I played on that team. That team left for a while, and now it’s coming back with a new owner. The team is in San Juan, the capital, so it will be really good for Puerto Rican basketball and the pro league down there. It’s really important for the kids and the fans to have a league in Puerto Rico, so this year should be a lot of fun.”

J.J. Barea and Estudiantes have reached an agreement for the two sides to part ways as Encestando reported and the player later confirmed. The former NBA champion had joined the team on January, signing a contract until the end of the season “It becomes official tomorrow [11/5), Barea said to El Vocero. “But yes, I’m going home to see my children. But it’s all good. We came to an agreement. What’s left is one game and you had to wait until May 21. They postponed it then. But I told them that I had to go home and see the childre. Tomorrow I leave for Dallas.”

Santaella believes that Barea will be out on the court for one or two more seasons. His priority will be to return to the NBA. “José is not going to let his NBA chapter close like this. He has basketball left and I understand that he can play 15 to 18 minutes per high-level game. This season, his time on the court was productive. He did not play much because the team wanted to give young people more opportunities. I think some NBA team is going to offer him a one-year deal. In the worst case scenario, he would go to play in the ACB where there are teams that have asked for him. I imagine he is going to rest for a while and in November and December he will decide where he is going to play. I don’t see him retiring right now,” Santaella said.

Meanwhile, the Mavericks remain in a strong position to re-sign guard J.J. Barea, who rejoined the team last season on a veteran’s minimum deal. Barea, like Terry, was a vital cog on the championship team in 2011. Barea has other options, most notably with the Miami Heat. But a source said that the Mavericks believe it is trending in a good direction and that Barea could be set to sign for the cap-room exception of $2.8-million and likely would get at least a two-year deal, with the possibility of a three-year agreement with a player option for that third season.
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July 28, 2021 | 7:51 am EDT Update

Devin Booker: 'There's no hate towards Jrue Holiday or Khris Middleton'

And two players from the Bucks are not only also on the American team, but circumstances were such that the three had to share a private plane ride across the Pacific last weekend — a day after the Bucks’ championship parade. “The memories are there, but it’s nothing personal between us,” Booker said. “We lost and that’s it, and I’m man enough to accept that and move on. There’s no hate towards Jrue or K Mid.”
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Months after LeBron James lost a Finals, he’d always say it was something he’d never get over. Good thing he never had to be Devin Booker, who barely had 10 minutes to try and put it behind him. “I’m a forward thinker and able to move onto the next thing, and be able to take my ‘L’ and move on,” Booker said Wednesday, in his first comments since the night his Phoenix Suns lost to the Milwaukee Bucks in Game 6 of the NBA Finals, eight days ago.
Booker’s coach on Team USA, Gregg Popovich, and teammate Draymond Green (not to mention assistant coach Steve Kerr, but we digress) have been in Booker’s shoes, having lost a Finals. He said Popovich and Green discussed it with him “in short conversation.” “Talkin’ about it with Draymond, and him stressing the fact that it’s not gonna be that easy to get back to the Finals,” Booker said. “I remember us as a team saying that in the locker room after we lost — you know we’ve got to understand, it’s going to be even harder to make it to the point we were at. … But I’m excited for the experience. It was great. I am glad I got to do it, obviously ended up on the wrong side of the stick, but that’s life.”
“It’s a HUGE deal,” former NBA player Raja Bell said of the international ball in a text with CBS Sports on Tuesday. “I’ve always said that FIBA balls affected my shot and other NBA players’ shots tremendously. I HATE that ball! “It’s lighter, feels smaller, different texture,” Bell continued. “I mean, when the art of shooting is based on muscle memory, and you change all the factors except the rim size and height, it’s going to be difficult.”
Storyline: Olympic Games
In another exchange with a Western Conference scout, the conclusion was similar. “[The ball is] definitely a factor,” the scout said. “How big a factor I guess depends on the particular player. But it’s an adjustment for everyone. Some guys are going to make [the adjustment] easier than others.” And another text from an Eastern Conference scout with international playing experience: “It’s pretty different, and it takes some getting used to. It’s much softer than NBA or college basketballs.”
It should be comforting for Jalen Johnson to know he’ll be a first-round selection in Thursday night’s NBA draft. What should be more stressful for the former Nicolet High School standout is where he’ll actually be chosen. Johnson, a talented 6-foot-9 forward, has elicited a wide-range of opinions from NBA draft personnel. Said one longtime NBA personnel director of Johnson: “He is, to me, the biggest wild-card in the draft. I wouldn’t be shocked if he went in the lottery, like around 12 or so, and I wouldn’t be shocked if he fell into the 20s.’’
“Part of the evolution of African interest and passion for the game goes back to Hakeem’s entry into the game,” said Victor Williams, chief executive of NBA Africa. “Giannis is doing the same thing for today’s generation of African kids — and they do recognize him as African.” Antetokounmpo is known as “The Greek Freak” because he was born in Athens, but he grew up in a Nigerian home. His mother, Veronica, is Igbo. His late father, Charles, is from the same Yoruba tribe as Olajuwon. His last name — Adetokunbo — was Hellenized when he finally became a citizen of Greece and received his passport, one month before the Bucks drafted him 15th in 2013.