NBA Rumor: Real Estate

229 rumors in this storyline

Deron Williams, formerly of the Brooklyn Nets, has finally sold his Tribeca penthouse at 35 North Moore St. for less than half its original asking price. Williams paid $15.8 million for the glam pad in 2013 and then made a splash, listing it for $33.5 million in 2015. But it took a pandemic — and multiple price slashes — before it finally found a buyer, who loved its massive size and COVID-friendly outdoor spaces.

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It’s been a great month for JaVale McGee. Just a few days after winning an NBA championship with the Lakers, the big man has sold his Encino home of five years for $2.49 million. He’ll walk away with a profit of about $70,000 compared with 2015, when he bought the Mediterranean-style retreat from Grammy-winning singer-songwriter Marc Anthony for $2.42 million. Designed for entertaining, the secluded property is tucked behind two sets of gates and centers on a three-story home of nearly 6,300 square feet. Out back, palm trees and string lights top a resort-style space with a swimming pool, spa, gazebo, shower room and cabana with a bar.

Although the deal was extensively reported in July, it’s only today — fittingly, near the end of a fantastic Lakers season — that LeBron James has finally closed on his $36.8 million residential upgrade in the 90210, a multi-structure compound packing fantastic views and a storied, only-in-Hollywood pedigree. Built in the 1930s, the colorful Mediterranean-esque villa was owned for years by Charles Boyer, an Oscar-nominated leading man actor of that era who starred in a number of black-and-white classics, among them “Conquest” and “Algiers.”

Shaquille O’Neal, after opening a chicken sandwich shop near the Strip, has bought a house in Las Vegas, records indicate. The 7-foot-1-inch basketball Hall of Famer, known for his powerful dunks, lousy free throws and even worse movies, purchased a home in the Southern Highlands community, at the southern tip of the valley, early this year before the coronavirus pandemic upended daily life across the U.S., property records indicate. The $765,000 sale closed Feb. 19.

Gordon Hayward has a sprawling $3 million mansion in Indiana that sits on nearly seven acres — with a pool, wine cellar and every fancy bell and whistle a house can boast. A grand 2-story entryway, outdoor kitchen, hearth room, theater and ornate woodwork spread throughout. Hayward bought the home in July 2019 from D10 Investments, LLC, for $3 million, according to public records. The former Butler basketball standout and Celtics star has a home in Boston, too. Earlier this year, he was the owner of a third property, a massive Rancho Santa Fe, California, estate worth $3.9 million, but he sold that in March.

It looks like the luxury real estate market is still hot in the San Francisco Bay Area. NBA forward Andre Iguodala, previously with the Golden State Warriors and now attached to the Miami Heat, has let go of his mansion in Lafayette, CA. Designed by architect Ken Hertel, the Tuscan-style build was sold in just six weeks. For the athlete, selling quickly may have been more important than making a profit. He purchased the home in 2017 for $3.6 million, and just sold it for $3.65 million.

Orlando Magic shooting guard Evan Fournier and his wife, Laura, have picked up a chic estate in Winter Park, FL, for $2.9 million. The NBA player scored a deal. The Winter Park Chain of Lakes property had been listed earlier in the year for $3.25 million, and had then been dropped to $3.15 million in May, before the Frenchman grabbed it. Overlooking the picturesque Lake Maitland, this sweet pad features timeless design in a convenient neighborhood close to downtown, about a 15-minute drive to the Amway Center, where the Magic normally plays home games.

Basketball big man DeMarcus Cousins is looking to cash out in Las Vegas, listing his 20,000-square-foot showplace for $8 million. Records show the four-time All-Star, who sat out this season with a torn ACL, bought the home through a corporate entity three years ago for $6.5 million. A few miles west of the Las Vegas Strip, the amenity-loaded mansion offers a world of entertainment across nearly two acres. A circular driveway is capped by a porte-cochere entry at the front of the estate, which takes in sweeping views of the surrounding mountains.

In Bel-Air, the striking home built for basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain has resurfaced with a reduced price tag of $14.9 million, or about $4 million shy of what it originally sought in 2018. Like the basketball star himself — who holds the record for most points scored in an NBA game at 100 — the house possesses a near-mythical quality. Chamberlain had the home built in the ’70s, and it became known as Ursa Major, the star constellation home to the Big Dipper — one of Chamberlain’s many nicknames.

Doc Rivers, a former NBA All-Star player and championship coach, who since 2013 has been the head coach of the Los Angeles Clippers, is looking to shake up his real estate portfolio, quietly listing a beachfront home in Malibu for nearly $13 million. The house was once owned by TV exec Don Ohlmeyer and leased by Backstreet Boy Nick Carter. Property records indicate the former point guard, who led the Clippers to the playoffs last year but lost in six games to the Golden State Warriors, purchased the Spanish-style residence in 2017 for a bit more than $9.5 million. A quick comparison with online listings at the time of his purchase show the four-bedroom and 5.5-bathroom home, located in a prestigious guard-gated enclave, was subsequently renovated in a relaxed, contemporary style that offers panoramic coastline and endless ocean and sunset views.

Jordan Farmar, a former NBA player and two-time champion with the Los Angeles Lakers, loves calling Las Vegas his home for the last six years. He now has a hand in building his own. The Los Angeles native, his wife, Jill, a former professional soccer player, and their two daughters will be moving into their new home in Southern Highlands in May. Domanico Custom Homes is constructing the home valued at $3.5 million, and Farmar and his new carpentry skills have helped it along.

The 33-year-old Farmar, who is retired from the NBA, lives in Southern Highlands in a home he has occupied for the last few years. Before that, Farmar bought the 2016 New American Home in MacDonald Highlands in Henderson, which was showcased at the International Builders’ Show in Las Vegas. He lived there for less than a year before moving back to Southern Highlands in a 4,000-square-foot home. “I moved to Vegas (as a tax shelter) while I was still playing,” Farmar said. “The more we stayed out here, the more we fell in love with it and the less I wanted to be in Los Angeles. Now I don’t like to go there at all. I go there and handle my business and come back as soon as possible.”

Meyers Leonard’s Oregon residence listed for $3M. Have you ever wanted to live in a mansion? Have you ever wanted to live in a house a Trail Blazer used to call home? Is your answer yes to both questions? Well, you’re in luck. If you have an extra $3 million laying around, you can take a mansion off of Meyers Leonard’s hands. The house, all 7,934 square feet if it, is nothing short of a dream home.

While the NBA is on hiatus, former Thunder star Russell Westbrook found time to wrap up some business back in Oklahoma. His single-story home, which he bought shortly after joining the team in 2008, just sold for $426,900. The nine-time All-Star, who now plays for the Houston Rockets, has purchased plenty of real estate since then. In 2015, he bought a Beverly Crest abode from Scott Disick for $4.65 million and upgraded again three years later, nabbing a Brentwood mansion near LeBron James for $19.75 million. This one’s a bit more modest at just over 3,000 square feet. It sits on a landscaped lot in Edmond, a suburban city a few miles north of the Thunder stadium.

Briefly with the Cleveland Cavaliers and now balling for the Utah Jazz, former L.A. Laker Jordan Clarkson seeks $3.35 million for a fairly recently purchased home in L.A.’s proto-suburban Woodland Hills community. The 6’4” guard purchased the then brand-spanking new house not even two years ago for a wee bit less than $3.2 million. Described in listings held by Zeev Perez at Keller Williams as a Cape Cod style home, the roughly 5,800-square-foot, family-sized structure is set behind a low fence and electronic driveway gates with five bedrooms and five full and two half bathrooms.

In contrast to a number of teammates who’ve bought properties in the Milwaukee space, Pat Connaughton has gone a step additional: He is tearing down a dilapidated duplex so he can substitute it with a four-story house constructing. “I’ll attempt to personal this endlessly,” Connaughton, 27, stated on a current morning as he stepped inside the husk of the outdated duplex at the nook of North Milwaukee and East Knapp streets, simply a few blocks from Fiserv Discussion board, the place the Bucks play their residence video games.

However Connaughton might see the future: a three-unit constructing full of recent facilities topped by a 3,132-square-foot penthouse, which he plans to make his residence. Need to be his neighbor? Connaughton goes to hire out the different two models. (Bucks workers can count on a low cost.) He hopes to finish the undertaking by midsummer. If the Bucks win a championship, the parade can launch from his new pad. “I’ll have a housewarming occasion to kick it off,” Connaughton stated.

Connaughton has been constructing a second profession in actual property via his improvement firm, Seashore Home LLC, which is a household affair. His father, Len, is the vp, and Joe Stanton, a childhood good friend, is the director of undertaking administration. The corporate owns 4 properties and bought two others in Portland, Ore., the place Connaughton spent three seasons taking part in for the Path Blazers. Seashore Home additionally owns three properties and bought one other in South Bend, Ind., the place Connaughton was a two-sport star at Notre Dame. And in Milwaukee, he has two initiatives in the works, together with the house constructing close to the enviornment. Connaughton bought the property, which had been vacant for months, for $325,000, and he expects the rebuild to price a further $800,000.

Curry, who signed a $201 million, five-year contract in 2017, snapped up a condo in the Four Seasons Private Residences at 706 Mission St., a new tower opening in June across from Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. The price for the 2,800-square-foot condo the Currys bought was just under $8 million, according to real estate sources familiar with the unit and building. The unit is on the 30th floor — coincidentally, Curry wears No. 30 for the Warriors.

NBA fans know two things about Houston Rockets guard James Harden—his beard is legendary and he’s a prolific basketball scorer (he’s averaging 38.3 points per game this season). But that’s a drop in the bucket compared to the $10 million Houston mansion the All-Star scored. Harden’s estate, called Memorial Modern, took three years to build and spans 3.5 acres in Rivercrest, an exclusive enclave in suburban Houston. The 26,000-square-foot ultra-modern manse features a grotto, wine room, casita, prep kitchen, full bar and a fitness room. It’s crafted from commercial-grade steel with minimalist design elements.

NBA star Trae Young is beastin’ for the Atlanta Hawks right now … and he’s rewarding himself by buying a $1.5 million crib in his home state of Oklahoma!! TMZ Sports has learned … Trae bought himself a new 8,100-square-foot pad in Norman Oklahoma where he grew up — his first LEGIT house … and it’s loaded!!! The pad comes with 5 bedrooms, 6 baths, a massive kitchen, a pool with a cool slide, a pool house … and you can put up to 7 cars in his giant garage!

“CSI” creator Anthony Zuiker sold his concrete-clad contemporary in Malibu to Atlanta Hawks forward Chandler Parsons for $9.25 million. The 1.4-acre property includes a saltwater swimming pool and a covered pavilion perched above a tennis court. The 5,555-square-foot floor plan has a two-story entry, a semicircular living room, a dining room with tray ceilings and five bedrooms. Parsons, 31, previously played for the Memphis Grizzlies, the Dallas Mavericks and the Houston Rockets.

Twenty-seven years later, the four-time NBA champion with the Los Angeles Lakers and Miami Heat hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony, alongside Mayor Ras Baraka, at an $80 million, 22-story building at 50 Rector Park in the Newark Downtown District. The development, known around town as “Shaq Tower,” is the first high-rise apartment building to join the city’s skyline in more than 50 years. The project came about as a public-private partnership between Shaq, the city, the state of New Jersey, New Brunswick-based Boraie Development and the Goldman Sachs Urban Investment Group. The new tower was also boosted by a $24 million New Jersey Department of Economic Development Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit. The building’s one million square feet of space includes ground-floor retail space and 169 residential units—with monthly rents ranging from $1,800 to $2,895—as well as a gym, co-working lounge, private dining room, sky deck and Amazon lockers.

Gilbert’s cultivation of the Trump family appears to have paid off: Three swaths of downtown Detroit were selected as opportunity zones under the Trump tax law, extending a valuable tax break to Gilbert’s real estate empire. Gilbert’s relationship with the White House helped him win his desired tax break, an email obtained by ProPublica suggests. In February 2018, as the selection process was underway, a top Michigan economic development official asked her colleague to call Quicken’s executive vice president for government affairs about opportunity zones. “They worked with the White House on it and want to be sure we are coordinated,” wrote the official, Christine Roeder, in an email with the subject line “Quicken.”

Gilbert influenced the local selection process, as well, other emails obtained by ProPublica show: Quicken’s top lobbyist was so enmeshed in the process, his name appears on an opportunity zone map made by the city economic development organization, recommending part of downtown be included in the tax break. No other non-city officials are named on the document. The result has likely already been a boon to Gilbert: Multiple studies have found that property values in opportunity zones increased because of the tax break. Gilbert has put an estimated $3 billion into buying and renovating properties in Detroit, the vast majority now in opportunity zones.

The White House, Treasury Department and Quicken Loans all declined to answer repeated questions about Gilbert’s interactions with the Trump administration regarding opportunity zones. Roeder didn’t respond to requests for comment. A spokesperson for the Michigan Economic Development Corporation declined to elaborate on the email mentioning Quicken’s work with the White House. In a statement, Jared Fleisher, Quicken Loans vice president of government affairs, acknowledged Gilbert’s companies gave input to the state but said they “did not exercise any inappropriate influence.” The companies “joined a wide range of stakeholders in providing feedback into the Opportunity Zone selection process,” he said. “The State of Michigan engaged interested parties, asked for their input, and encouraged participants to share the State of Michigan’s request for input with other potentially interested groups.”

Experts say two of the downtown Detroit tracts are islands of wealth in the city, one of the poorest in the nation. They are significantly wealthier by median income than the surrounding area. They include Gilbert-owned office space with high-end tenants including Microsoft, JP Morgan and Quicken Loans. The boutique Shinola Hotel sits in another Gilbert property that is now in one of the opportunity zones. While the tax break is supposed to generate new development, Gilbert already has several long-planned projects located in the newly designated zones, including the construction of a glass-and-steel skyscraper on the historic Hudson’s department store site.
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November 27, 2020 | 1:58 am EST Update
And as is usually the case when the Celtics don’t turn a highly publicized rumor into a reality, we’re getting a reason why that deal never went through. According to ESPN’s Zach Lowe, the Celtics were never really that high on Turner. Boston apparently didn’t see him as a very big upgrade to their frontcourt, and was even exploring other deals to trade Turner had the deal with Indiana come to fruition. “Talking to people and reading the tea leaves as best I could, it really comes down to the Celtics didn’t want Myles Turner,” Lowe said on The Lowe Post Podcast. “I did hear from some teams around the league that the Celtics have done some preliminary research on what Myles Turner’s trade value would have been to them had they acquired him either in this deal or in a separate deal, and obviously didn’t like what they saw.”
Storyline: Myles Turner Trade?
For quite some time during his 2020 offseason, Marc Gasol was rumored to be considering a return to Europe and his native Spain by joining Barcelona. Now a player of the Los Angeles Lakers, Gasol shut down those rumors as pure speculation, saying that there wasn’t even a talk with Barcelona. “That was not accurate at all,” Gasol said when asked how close he was to going back to Spain during first official presser by the Los Angeles Lakers. “I think someone made that assumption just because I’m not very ‘out there’ and communicate on things. I think people just try to make that decision for me and thought that was a very good time to try it. I never stated that. I was never close to that. I never even spoke to Barcelona about it.” “That came as surprise to me but that’s the world we’re living now. You’re hearing something and everybody runs with it,” Gasol added.
Have you gotten a chance to speak to those guys – Damian Lillard, CJ McCollum? How are they feeling about you returning to the team? Enes Kanter: The day I got traded to Portland, Dame texted me, and he said, ‘Let’s go out there and win a championship.’ I was just super excited. I also saw CJ yesterday, and he was just very happy for me being here. But not only them, all the other guys as well. They were my ex-teammates, and they were so happy to see me come back. It was reported that Boston gave you two choices. Either the Blazers or the Grizzlies. Was this report accurate? Enes Kanter: Most of the time, they were talking to my agent. When my agent called me and said that you’re getting traded to Portland, I was like, ‘I was here two years ago, and I had an amazing time, so let’s do it again.’
Wanamaker racked up titles and All-Star appearances during his overseas career, but he didn’t make his NBA debut until Oct. 16, 2018. He was 28 at the time, just over three months removed from signing a one-year contract with the Boston Celtics and still trying to prove that he belonged. “The NBA was always my dream, and I always wanted to play in the NBA,” Wanamaker told reporters on a video conference call Wednesday. “As I got older, I kind of doubted myself that maybe I wasn’t good enough to play in the NBA. And then when the Boston situation came, it was a thing where I wanted to prove to myself if I was able to play. … I wanted to take the chance and see, ‘Am I really made for the NBA, or am I just a guy that’s going to play high-level basketball overseas?’ “
Who’s to say what Silas knew about the discord inside the organization he was about to join? Mike D’Antoni chose to leave, and Morey was out too — that much was obvious. Rockets owner Tilman Fertitta preferred Jeff Van Gundy for coach, sources say, while Harden and Westbrook wanted Tyronn Lue. Silas was to be the brokered compromise, but both star players chose to try to push their way out after he was hired anyway.
The world has changed drastically in the two years since D1 Capital launched. And Dan Sundheim has made money through it all, thanks to a string of bets that have emerged as winners in the new normal. The Wharton grad now has at least $1 billion in personal wealth between his assets in his firm, stake in the NBA’s Charlotte Hornets, real-estate portfolio, and art collection. The former Viking Global Investors chief investment officer started trading at D1 in July 2018 with more than $5 billion – including more than $500 million of his own money – and hasn’t looked back.