NBA Rumor: Spencer Dinwiddie Injury

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Spencer Dinwiddie: Let me walk y’all down memory lane for a second. January 12th 2014 against UW I suffered an injury. Massive amounts of pain and shock in A non contact full tear of my ACL. The MRI would later reveal a completely torn lateral meniscus, MCL and partial tearing to the medial meniscus along with bruising in my bones. Surgery took 4hrs, mostly to stitch my lateral meniscus back together. Post op prognosis, “will not play for a full year, may not ever return to the same level. Should definitely go back to school and get his degree”. I had to spend 7 weeks non weight bearing, essentially losing all muscle in my left leg. As many of you know I declared for the draft 3 months later, was fully cleared by the 7 month mark and participated in both training camp (Stan Van Gundy two a days) and pre season that year. I’ve spent the last 6.5 years making sure this would never happen to me again, being meticulous in diet, lifting and recovery from the beginning of my career. Those trials built the focus and fortitude to go from a second round pick to a g league cast off to the 20ppg leader of a playoff team, earning the respect of my peers along the way.

“Filling [Dinwiddie’s] spot in the rotation is … on the one hand it’s difficult because he has such a unique profile: A lot of athleticism and versatility,” Nash said. “On the other hand, we have depth. So we’ll see. I don’t have necessarily a formula for you yet. But we have depth and we have guys that we’re confident in that can fill those minutes.” LeVert had been thriving in a sixth-man role, separated from high-usage rate players like Durant and Irving. But with Dinwiddie gone, he was tasked with running the point. Prince was the power forward last season with Durant out.

Dinwiddie went down awkwardly trying to plant and immediately grabbed at his knee. He did manage to walk off under his own power with 10:12 left in the third, but he was clearly favoring the injured knee and headed back to the locker room. It was a non-contact injury, which is always worrisome. “He means a lot,” Jarrett Allen said. “When Spencer is going, he can’t be stopped. His offensive game, when he’s going downhill creating shots for others. And even off the court everyone loves having Spencer around. His energy, just his personality is great for the locker room.
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January 24, 2021 | 6:17 am EST Update

NBA players want equity in teams

Speaking at a SporticoLive event on Tuesday, Roberts said that while players share in the passion for the game, and in the responsibility of growing the NBA’s multi-billion-dollar enterprise, “what we don’t share is having an equity stake in the teams.” “We’ve got a collective bargaining agreement that says we can’t [own stakes], and hopefully down the road we’ll make some changes,” she said. “The players will be the last to suggest that we want to see the game’s value, or teams’ values, in any way diminish, but it sure would be nice to be able to go to the party.”
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The league is also making changes to make it easier to attract minority investors. Last year it greenlit Dyal Homecourt to raise money for a fund that could invest in multiple teams. Now it’s discussing an expansion of that program, where other institutional investors could gain the same right. “If [private equity investment] happens,” Roberts said, “I will have players complain bitterly that, ‘Wow, we helped create this wealth, we helped create this value, and some private equity guy can come in and I can’t?’”
One suggestion: Instead of giving equity to players themselves, give it to the union. That wouldn’t necessarily result in checks to individual athletes, but it would give the NBPA more resources to support players and their communities. Another suggestion: a structure similar to employee stock options, which are common in other some businesses. “There’s a way, in other words, for players to enjoy equity in these teams that may be non-traditional,” Roberts said. “It may be a little different from the way we do it on the private side, but I still think there’s an opportunity for us to talk about, think about and ultimately resolve what I believe to be an inequity in the system.”