NBA Rumor: Spencer Dinwiddie Trade?

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Irving implied as much himself, when he bluntly stated the franchise will have to add more in the summer if it hopes to contend. The Nets have more trade assets than most teams, including Dinwiddie and Jarrett Allen, but LeVert might be the most prized chip of them all. “He’s got three years guaranteed at $17 million; that’s a high-value contract for him, locking into that contract when you’ve had that many injuries at Michigan,” said ESPN cap guru Bobby Marks, who is a former Nets assistant GM. “Yeah, that’s a good number as far as if you’re looking at a team. That’s not a dead-weight contract.” Now Nets GM Sean Marks must decide if it’s too high-value to trade, if the young wing’s torrid form before the season got shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic is sustainable.

If Marks goes the trade route, ESPN NBA analyst Bobby Marks, who once served as assistant GM of the Nets, believes the biggest trade chips are Spencer Dinwiddie and Caris LeVert, who split time with Irving in the backcourt for the few games all were healthy. “I think Dinwiddie provides the ultimate insurance policy for Kyrie,” Bobby Marks said in a recent interview with Newsday. “Do you trust Kyrie to stay healthy? I don’t know the answer to that question. On the other hand, Dinwiddie will be technically on an expiring contract (with a player option at the end of 2020-21). He’ll likely opt out. He can be extended starting in December, and are you comfortable having your two point guards making north of $50 million per year?

If Marks goes the trade route, ESPN NBA analyst Bobby Marks, who once served as assistant GM of the Nets, believes the biggest trade chips are Spencer Dinwiddie and Caris LeVert, who split time with Irving in the backcourt for the few games all were healthy. “I think Dinwiddie provides the ultimate insurance policy for Kyrie,” Bobby Marks said in a recent interview with Newsday. “Do you trust Kyrie to stay healthy? I don’t know the answer to that question. On the other hand, Dinwiddie will be technically on an expiring contract (with a player option at the end of 2020-21). He’ll likely opt out. He can be extended starting in December, and are you comfortable having your two point guards making north of $50 million per year?

“For me, man, the business is the business,” Dinwiddie said. “For all the stuff we talk about player empowerment, we get mad at players for making decision that [they] feel is best for them or best for their families or whatever. That literally is the business. “These teams are going to do what they do. I very well may not be here tomorrow and that’s part of it. And will appreciate every second that I was in Brooklyn and I’ll understand that they’re going to do what they feel is best for the team moving forward trying to win a championship. You can’t take it a certain way, you’ve got to roll with it.”

Interesting conversation I had with a league exec – with Kyrie Irving in Brooklyn, should aspiring teams trade assets for Spencer Dinwiddie to be their lead guard? Is he capable of being one of the two or three best players on a good team? Based on early returns during Irving’s absence, the answer is yes. Pushed to the second round of the 2014 draft after tearing his ACL in his final season at Colorado, Dinwiddie keeps adding to his game every year. Now in his sixth season, he’s run the Nets’ offense so well in Irving’s absence that Brooklyn hasn’t missed a beat — the Nets are 10-5 in his 15 games as a starter.

Dinwiddie, who became a father to his son Elijah shortly after last season, was also the subject of trade rumors with the Phoenix Suns, Cleveland Cavaliers and others while a member of the Nets. “Being in trade rumors all summer, I guess it’s two pieces,” Dinwiddie said. “I want to be here. I love being here, so I’m happy that they didn’t (trade him). On the flip side, the fact that the spectrum of teams that were calling means that, obviously, I played well. Because I’ve been on the other side of that situation, where obviously nobody really cared what I was doing. It’s cool in that respect. I guess mildly stressful, but at the same time I can’t control it, so it doesn’t really matter. If Sean (Marks) tells me that I’ve got to go to Phoenix tomorrow, then I’ve got to pack my bags and go to Phoenix. This is nothing I control.”

Years of health issues and bad roster fits behind him, Dinwiddie was a finalist for the N.B.A.’s Most Improved Player Award. He is the kind of young star you would expect to be settling into security, but after a summer as the subject of several trade rumors — only to have the Nets trade Jeremy Lin instead — he is not ready to assume he has found a permanent home. “Is my place on the team secure?” he said, arching his eyebrows and breaking into a large smile. “I don’t know.”

Does it suck a bit that you’re not a free agent this offseason after a 👌 year? You’d probably be looking at long-term security for the first time. Spencer Dinwiddie: Nah, it is what it is. I’m not worried about it. I didn’t get into this for money. I want to win and build a legacy. I have like 8-10 years left to do this at an extremely high level. I want eight championships and eight Finals MVPs. Thanks for that headline. Spencer Dinwiddie: Haha, no problem. Money will come as it’s supposed to. It is nice to know I’ll have a job next year though, LOL.

Zach Lowe: One little wrinkle about who the Cavs chased with their first round pick. The Cavs had talks with the Nets about Spencer Dinwiddie. Like … would the Nets take our pick for Dinwiddie. The Nets wanted a LOT for Dinwiddie. I love the thinking though. A) Dinwiddie has been pretty good, fills a need and B) take him off the Nets and what does that do for the Nets’ pick that we own. Thats a fun one. A fun one. Brian Windhorst: In terms of Nets business, what about Jeremy Lin picking up his contract for next year … yesterday. ZL: Hey, why waste time? BW: We all knew he was picking it up. It’s funny, he’s ‘FYI, I’m picking it up.’

Spencer Dinwiddie knows Brooklyn is where he wants to be now and in the future. But he isn’t a fool. He knows it’s that time of the year for business decisions to be made. “The great part about this organization is that Sean Marks and Kenny [Atkinson] are always going to be diligent in the process, trying to improve the team not only by thinking about now, but thinking long-term,” Dinwiddie told NetsDaily. “And you have to respect that whichever way that happens. Obviously I was a beneficiary of that last year. If I’m moved, I’m moved. That’s just the way it goes.”

One scout suggested now might be the best time for the Nets to deal Spencer Dinwiddie, who has become a fan favorite and an absolute revelation. “I think the Nets will trade Dinwiddie at some point. They’ve got [Jeremy] Lin coming back. They feel D’Angelo Russell is part of their future. Dinwiddie’s value is probably the highest because he’s got another year at a low number ($1.656 million, partially guaranteed). And he’s playing real well,” the scout said. “If those guys come back healthy, he won’t play as much and then he’s an unrestricted free agent the following year and his value will be a lot lower.”

At the end of their podcast on the upcoming trade season, Zach Lowe asked Adrian Wojnarowski about teams he’ll be interested in watching at Thursday’s deadline approaches. Without suggesting any trade machine fodder, Woj reiterated what most pundits have been saying, the Nets could do some profit-taking on their development of “second chance guys.” He identified Joe Harris and Spencer Dinwiddie who have the most value, along with DeMarre Carroll, but he also said he thought the ceiling for Harris was “maybe a second (rounder)” and that the Nets would have to consider moving Dinwiddie if another offers a first rounder.

Adrian Wojnarowski: “Brooklyn will be interesting. They’ve done a great job of developing some of these second chance guys in the league –Spencer Dinwiddie, Joe Harris. (…) DeMarre Carroll has value because there are so few guys at his position available around the league. DeMarre Carroll has value. So, I think Brooklyn wanted to show progress this year, wanted to win more games and they don’t have their pick, so there’s no real motivation for them to tank. They wanted to show progress and they’ve certainly done that but they’ve done a good job. “Maybe Joe Harris gets them a second. Spencer Dinwiddie has just been tremendous. They have him next year on a team option at a really low number. So you’re not giving up Spencer Dinwiddie without getting a LOT back. whoever they would draft –lets say they got a pick — would he be better than Spencer Dinwiddie? Probably not and so I think Brooklyn has put themselves in a position where they can keep gathering up some assets.”
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