NBA Rumor: Stephen Curry Injury

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Steph Curry is wearing a butt pad and playing quite well in it. Is this butt pad a thing that’s happened a lot and I’m just now hearing about it, or is it a pioneering thing that Steph is doing? Jeff Stotts: There have been other examples of tailbone contusions in the NBA. I was a little surprised, those five games lost are a little outside the norm. Usually those injuries don’t require a lot of time. That being said, they can be very painful. I think we probably have guys coming back wearing those little butt pads on their contusions. We just don’t hear about it. But since it’s Steph and he openly talked about it, I think it’s getting some notoriety. That’s all you can really do for a tailbone. It’s all about padding it up so it doesn’t get aggravated.

Derek Bodner: #sixers afternoon injury report has the following players listed as questionable: – Ben Simmons (illness) – Dwight Howard (left knee soreness) – George Hill (right thumb) – Tobias Harris (right knee soreness) – Seth Curry (left hip flexor tightness Also: – Steph Curry (ankle)

Golden State Warriors star guard Stephen Curry practiced fully on Sunday and will be listed as questionable for Monday’s game against the Chicago Bulls after missing the past week and a half because of a tailbone bruise. “We scrimmaged some just now, and he’s getting some extra work in, so we want to see how he responds to that,” coach Steve Kerr said after Sunday’s practice. “And then it’s a discussion with (Warriors director of sports medicine and performance) Rick (Celebrini) and the training staff. We’ll see where it all goes.”

Golden State Warriors star guard Stephen Curry suffered a tailbone contusion at the end of the third quarter of Wednesday night’s 108-94 win against the Rockets in Houston and did not return. The injury occurred on the final play of the third quarter, after Curry missed an off-balance 3-pointer. His momentum took him off the floor and pushed him toward the risers by the Rockets’ bench. He appeared to trip on the first level of risers and was unable to break his fall.

“He says he’s going to be fine long term,” Kerr said. “It’s going to bother him, though, for definitely the next few days. No idea if he’ll play in Memphis [on Friday], but he seems to be feeling like he’ll be OK over the next week or so, but we’ll see … and please don’t take that to mean that I’m saying he’s going to be out for a week. He could be practicing [Thursday] for all I know, but we’ll give you an update as soon as we have one.”

“When Steph was injured last year with his hand, we did something different,” Fraser said of the new approach. “The performance staff came up with a scientific way to get him in really good shape, using interval training. Then we applied the basketball drills.” Based on early returns, it was an experiment gone right. “Steph felt like he was in such good shape and so sharp after that method that we decided to do it this summer,” Fraser said. “And then, Brandon Payne was thrown into the mix to add his touch. So, I would say those three parties constitute the macro scale. We’re all focused on using interval training plus what he’s done in the past.”

It remains to be seen if the second bubble will actually take place, but even if it does, it sure seems like you won’t be seeing Steph Curry play in it. ESPN’s Jackie MacMullan reported he wouldn’t have played in Orlando had the Warriors qualified, and it begs the question as to why Chicago would be any different. “I was told unequivocally by people at Golden State,” MacMullan said Thursday on the “Hoop Collective” podcast, “if Golden State came back (to play in Orlando) they weren’t gonna let Steph Curry step foot on the floor.” “The reason they were worried about Steph Curry,” MacMullan added, “was because they didn’t feel that he had played enough to come back.”

Is there concern it’ll never fully recover? “I’m getting used to what the new normal is,” Curry said. “It definitely feels different than the right (hand). But you try to get to the point when you’re playing basketball, you don’t think about it — whether it feels all the way same or not, it doesn’t really matter, as long as I’m not worried about the things I’m trying to do, the strength part of it and how it bounces back the next day after pushing it in contact stuff. “But to answer your question, it is going to feel different. Anybody who has had surgery knows it takes a long time to get back to true normal. Functionally speaking, where I’m not out there on the court thinking about it, that’s where I’m trying to get it to.”

As for Curry? The Warriors plan to reevaluate him in early March after fracturing his left wrist only four games into the season. Since then, Curry has spent the last three months healing. He has spent the past month completing various shooting workouts. “Steph is coming back. That’s not even a discussion internally,” Lacob said. “He’s ready to play so he should play. By the way, we’ll try to win every game. I’m not really about, ‘Let’s lose every game so we can get the best pick.’ You try to do that, you’re messing with the basketball gods. So we don’t believe in that.”

Curry already looks ready to play in his post-practice sessions. Judging by his shooting, his broken left hand looks healed. He is no longer wearing the brace. But he hasn’t played since Oct. 30. Saturday was his 40th game missed since the injury. By the All-Star break, Curry will have missed 51 games — the most he’s missed in a season since he missed 40 games in the lockout-shortened 2011-12 season when he severely sprained his right ankle.
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July 28, 2021 | 7:51 am EDT Update

Devin Booker: 'There's no hate towards Jrue Holiday or Khris Middleton'

And two players from the Bucks are not only also on the American team, but circumstances were such that the three had to share a private plane ride across the Pacific last weekend — a day after the Bucks’ championship parade. “The memories are there, but it’s nothing personal between us,” Booker said. “We lost and that’s it, and I’m man enough to accept that and move on. There’s no hate towards Jrue or K Mid.”
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Months after LeBron James lost a Finals, he’d always say it was something he’d never get over. Good thing he never had to be Devin Booker, who barely had 10 minutes to try and put it behind him. “I’m a forward thinker and able to move onto the next thing, and be able to take my ‘L’ and move on,” Booker said Wednesday, in his first comments since the night his Phoenix Suns lost to the Milwaukee Bucks in Game 6 of the NBA Finals, eight days ago.
Booker’s coach on Team USA, Gregg Popovich, and teammate Draymond Green (not to mention assistant coach Steve Kerr, but we digress) have been in Booker’s shoes, having lost a Finals. He said Popovich and Green discussed it with him “in short conversation.” “Talkin’ about it with Draymond, and him stressing the fact that it’s not gonna be that easy to get back to the Finals,” Booker said. “I remember us as a team saying that in the locker room after we lost — you know we’ve got to understand, it’s going to be even harder to make it to the point we were at. … But I’m excited for the experience. It was great. I am glad I got to do it, obviously ended up on the wrong side of the stick, but that’s life.”
“It’s a HUGE deal,” former NBA player Raja Bell said of the international ball in a text with CBS Sports on Tuesday. “I’ve always said that FIBA balls affected my shot and other NBA players’ shots tremendously. I HATE that ball! “It’s lighter, feels smaller, different texture,” Bell continued. “I mean, when the art of shooting is based on muscle memory, and you change all the factors except the rim size and height, it’s going to be difficult.”
Storyline: Olympic Games
In another exchange with a Western Conference scout, the conclusion was similar. “[The ball is] definitely a factor,” the scout said. “How big a factor I guess depends on the particular player. But it’s an adjustment for everyone. Some guys are going to make [the adjustment] easier than others.” And another text from an Eastern Conference scout with international playing experience: “It’s pretty different, and it takes some getting used to. It’s much softer than NBA or college basketballs.”
It should be comforting for Jalen Johnson to know he’ll be a first-round selection in Thursday night’s NBA draft. What should be more stressful for the former Nicolet High School standout is where he’ll actually be chosen. Johnson, a talented 6-foot-9 forward, has elicited a wide-range of opinions from NBA draft personnel. Said one longtime NBA personnel director of Johnson: “He is, to me, the biggest wild-card in the draft. I wouldn’t be shocked if he went in the lottery, like around 12 or so, and I wouldn’t be shocked if he fell into the 20s.’’
“Part of the evolution of African interest and passion for the game goes back to Hakeem’s entry into the game,” said Victor Williams, chief executive of NBA Africa. “Giannis is doing the same thing for today’s generation of African kids — and they do recognize him as African.” Antetokounmpo is known as “The Greek Freak” because he was born in Athens, but he grew up in a Nigerian home. His mother, Veronica, is Igbo. His late father, Charles, is from the same Yoruba tribe as Olajuwon. His last name — Adetokunbo — was Hellenized when he finally became a citizen of Greece and received his passport, one month before the Bucks drafted him 15th in 2013.