Bryan Colangelo Rumors

In the two years since, Colangelo has scarcely spoken publicly about the incident. When he spoke to the Herald from Arizona, he knew it was the elephant in the room. “I haven’t addressed it very much over the course of the last two years. I have stayed very much under the radar on the topic because it’s a sensitive topic, for a lot of reasons,” Colangelo said. “Family, personal, professional, or otherwise. I have to say I was dealt a pretty big blow, personally and professionally. And it’s been a difficult time dealing with the fallout. I was completely blindsided by the accusation and the storyline of the controversy.”
Storyline: Sixers Front Office
“Once that investigation was completed and I was absolved, I felt the appropriate thing to do – in conjunction with ownership there in Philly – was to mutually walk away. “It was a difficult decision and a difficult time for me. But I have to say, it was a very, very difficult time for my family. Because of some of the reasons that came to light, it was something I thought was important not to talk about, quite frankly. And we’re still dealing with that. “But the No.1 thing I thought needed to happen was trying to stay positive; preserve and love my family, protect their interests, emotionally or otherwise. And frankly, two years on, it’s gone. It’s in the past and I’m ready to move on.”
This answer also shows Colangelo doesn’t deserve credibility. He wasn’t absolved. It was untrue when Colangelo said it at the time, and it’s untrue now. The investigators concluded only that they found no forensic evidence that proved Colangelo knew of the Twitter accounts before they became public – and that they had a significant impediment to finding that evidence. Bottini deleted the contents of her phone before surrendering it for review.
I knew little about Johnson when I first saw him in Ottawa. He was sporting a very tame fauxhawk — shaved on the sides and back, a shortish patch of hair running through the middle of his dome. At the time, Raptors president and general manager Bryan Colangelo traditionally held a dinner at training camp for the travelling media. At The Keg in ByWard Market, I told Colangelo that I thought Johnson’s haircut was interesting. Colangelo suggested that it would be a good look for me.
And so it was at the Raven’s Nest Gym at Carleton — capacity, 1,500 people — Johnson came up to me snipping scissors in the air, before giving way to an actual barber. (Johnson donated some money. He was, and remains, a proper mensch.) I was nervous, sure, but my main memory is one of awkwardness. None of the fans who attended the scrimmage seemed to have any idea why this was happening. It was just very quiet. I think they would have preferred seeing The Raptor do some dunks off a trampoline. The haircut took longer than expected, and I could not see most of the second half, as they moved the proceedings from centre court to a corner of the arena once play re-started. Man, if something interesting happened in an intrasquad scrimmage for the first time, I would have been in trouble.
During his time in Philadelphia, Colangelo was caught up in a bizarre Twitter “burner” account scandal. It led to his resignation. Almost simultaneously, he disappeared from the public eye. At the time, an investigation by American sports and pop culture website The Ringer revealed five Twitter accounts that were critical of 76ers players, other NBA executives and released sensitive team information. Colangelo’s wife admitted to running three of the accounts.
“I haven’t addressed it very much over the course of the last two years. I have stayed very much under the radar on the topic because it’s a sensitive topic, for a lot of reasons,” Colangelo said. “Family, personal, professional, or otherwise. I have to say I was dealt a pretty big blow, personally and professionally. And it’s been a difficult time dealing with the fallout. I was completely blindsided by the accusation and the storyline of the controversy.”
Bryan Colangelo: “Once that investigation was completed and I was absolved, I felt the appropriate thing to do – in conjunction with ownership there in Philly – was to mutually walk away. It was a difficult decision and a difficult time for me. But I have to say, it was a very, very difficult time for my family. Because of some of the reasons that came to light, it was something I thought was important not to talk about, quite frankly. And we’re still dealing with that. But the No.1 thing I thought needed to happen was trying to stay positive; preserve and love my family, protect their interests, emotionally or otherwise. And frankly, two years on, it’s gone. It’s in the past and I’m ready to move on.”
LaMelo Ball’s bid to be a club owner in Australia hasn’t worked out. The American is expected to be a top pick in the upcoming NBA draft later this year. The Australian league – called the National Basketball League – has announced that a license for the Wollongong-based Hawks would go to a consortium led by ex-Philadelphia 76ers general manager Bryan Colangelo. Ball’s business manager, Jermaine Jackson, told ESPN in April that the ownership of the financially struggling club, where the 18-year-old American played last season, was a “done deal.”
The Hungry Jack’s NBL is pleased to announce it has awarded the licence for the Illawarra Hawks to a syndicate of local and overseas investors to lead the foundation club into an exciting new era. The syndicate includes Australian entrepreneur and former co-owner of the Sydney Kings, Dorry Kordahi, prominent former NBA executive Bryan Colangelo and US businessman and basketball influencer Michael Proctor.
Bryan Colangelo said: “Australian basketball with its great history has been on a significant rise for many years now and the NBL has played a significant role in growing the sport’s awareness and participation levels, while developing some of the best athlete and coaching talent the world has to offer. We are thrilled to be selected as new partners with the league and pledge to outperform the expectations placed on us and deliver for Hawks fans.”

Bryan Colangelo buys ownership stake on Australian team

Former Philadelphia 76ers GM and two-time NBA executive of the year Bryan Colangelo has purchased an ownership stake and will assume an advisory role with the Illawarra Hawks of Australia’s National Basketball League, sources tell ESPN. Colangelo is partnering with Australian (Dorry Kordahi) and American (Michael Proctor) businessmen to purchase a stake in the team, sources said.
If things go sour in the playoffs, executives and agents around the league say that the first big change would be to the coaching staff. Before team president Bryan Colangelo resigned in 2018, there were rumblings across the NBA that he planned to fire Brown and that his preferred replacement was Villanova head coach Jay Wright. Brown stuck around and Brand was hired as general manager, but last year’s locker room didn’t have the best relationship with Brown, multiple league sources said at the time. From the outside, it doesn’t seem like Brown is reaching his team this season, either, considering the inconsistent defensive effort and shaky offensive system. But ownership has supported Brown through the Process and two front-office regime changes.
Storyline: Brett Brown Hot Seat?
Harris, a private equity maven who, along with a group of nearly a dozen partners, purchased the Sixers in 2011 for $280 million, is a regular presence in Philly. But in the wake of Bryan Colangelo’s dismissal, he and the rest of his group have grown even more hands-on. This was made clear during the draft, when, according to league sources, it was minority owner David B. Heller who pulled the trigger on the trade sending No. 10 Mikal Bridges to the Phoenix Suns in exchange for Zhaire Smith and a future first-round pick.
Whenever the Bryan Colangelo/burner-accounts situation was unfolding over the summer, what was it like to be a player in the middle of that and what were your thoughts as things were surfacing? Robert Covington: It was a lot… But, I mean, you never really know the truth behind everything and you never know exactly what happened. I think you have to take everything with a grain of salt. You never know what the truth was behind it. But, as a player, you can’t allow yourself to get caught up in it too much because then it may start to affect your play and all that. We really just had to focus on what we had going on at that time. Then, during the offseason, that’s when everything played out [and Colangelo resigned]. Sometimes, you just have to move on. It’s sad that it happened to us, considering how everything was going [in the right direction]. But things happen.
Storyline: Sixer Burner Accounts
It’s a lot to manage for a perennially under-funded national sports organization. According to multiple sources with direct knowledge of the situation another former NBA executive with deep Canadian ties — former Toronto Raptors president Bryan Colangelo — has significant interest in contributing to the program in some capacity. There have been preliminary talks between Colangelo and those close to the CB board with more to follow. For his part, Colangelo — who was pushed out of his general manager’s role with the Philadelphia 76ers after his wife was determined to have made sensitive team information public via anonymous ‘burner’ accounts on Twitter — could be a good fit in a consulting or advisory type role that would offer him a chance to give back to the sport while also keeping in touch with the game at the highest levels as he works to rebuild his professional reputation.
JJ Redick: “You have a responsibility to cover the story, I get it. What made me angry that day, and it had been festering, was the way in which people were covering [his issues]. Every practice you’d see this mad rush [by the media] to get prime footage location. They’d record him doing mundane things. At that point we’d seen months of him shooting. That day Bryan Colangelo had a press conference and after that they all come in with body language like they were vultures preying over a dying, decaying body. The kid was 19, he’s clearly going through something. I got angry and basically cussed them out. He was my rookie so I guess I was protective but also empathetic. Whatever he was going through, physically or mentally, as an athlete we’ve all been there. There’s varying degrees of extremes to that but we’ve been there.”
2 years ago via ESPN
Officially, Colangelo resigned, though sources told Yahoo Sports that Colangelo, 53, fought to keep his job the last few days as the law firm the Sixers engaged wound down its investigation. Its conclusions: Colangelo’s wife, Barbara Bottini, established and operated the accounts — which Bottini confirmed. And while it couldn’t determine if Colangelo was aware of them, there was “substantial evidence that Mr. Colangelo was the source of sensitive, non-public, club-related information contained in certain posts to the Twitter accounts,” and it believes Colangelo was “careless and in some instances reckless in failing to properly safeguard” the information, the firm said in a statement.
Storyline: Sixer Burner Accounts
But even with the Sixers coming off their best regular season in almost two decades, the views expressed in the Twitter accounts that Colangelo’s wife admitted to being behind would’ve made it tough for the team to maintain its upward trajectory. Colangelo contended in his statement that, “The content she shared was filled with inaccuracies and conjecture which in no way represent my own views or opinions.” An alleged failed physical by Jahlil Okafor is one of the inaccuracies, according to multiple league sources. But whether the tweets were truths, half-truths, or falsehoods, Colangelo’s relationship with the players was irreconcilable as a result, according to multiple league sources.
Tom Moore: Bryan Colangelo statement vs #Sixers: While I am grateful that the independent investigation conducted by the 76ers has confirmed that I had no knowledge of or involvement in the Twitter activity conducted by my wife, I vigorously dispute the allegation that my conduct was in any way reckless. At no point did I ever purposefully or directly share any sensitive, non-public, club-related information with her. Her actions were a seriously misguided effort to publicly defend and support me, and while I recognize how inappropriate these actions were, she acted independently and witho. my knowledge or consent. Further, the content she shared was filled with inaccuracies and conjecture which in no way represent my own views or opinions. While this was obviously a mistake, we are a family and we will work through this together.
Storyline: Sixer Burner Accounts
Bryan Colangelo: Although I am not directly responsible for the actions, I regret this incident occurred and understand that it has become a distraction for the team. Therefore, the organization and I have mutually agreed to part ways. Over the last two years, I have worked hard to help build a foundation for what I hope will soon be many championship seasons for the 76ers. I am grateful to team owners Josh Harris and David Blitzer for the opportunity they gave me to be part of such a great organization. I am saddened to have to leave under these circumstances. Basketball has been a core part of my life since childhood. I love the game and all those who play and coach it. I want to thank the many colleagues, players and friends from around the League and elsewhere who have expressed their support and encouragement during this difficult and painful time for me and my family.
Philadelphia 76ers: Statement from 76ers Managing Partner Josh Harris: The Philadelphia 76ers organization has accepted the resignation of President of Basketball Operations Bryan Colangelo, effective immediately. We appreciate Bryan’s many contributions during his time leading our basketball operations and thank him for the work he did in positioning the team for long-term success.
Philadelphia 76ers: An independent investigation by New York-based law firm Paul, Weiss, Rifkind, Wharton & Garrison LLP was conducted into certain anonymous social media accounts that posted information concerning the club, personnel, and related topics (a statement of the findings is attached). It has become clear Bryan’s relationship with our team and his ability to lead the 76ers moving forward has been compromised. Recognizing the detrimental impact this matter had on the organization, Colangelo offered his resignation. We find the situation to be disappointing for our entire organization. We are determined to continue the tremendous progress we have made over the last two seasons in our quest to win an NBA Championship. As such, we have appointed head coach Brett Brown to oversee basketball operations on an interim basis to lead our efforts in this important offseason. He will work closely with the rest of our talented basketball operations department in preparing for the upcoming NBA Draft and thereafter until a new General Manager is found. The search for a new General Manager will commence immediately.
Storyline: Sixer Burner Accounts
With one of the stranger sagas in Philadelphia sports history coming to a close, the Sixers are left to prepare for what may be the most important offseason in franchise history with the lead decision-making role wide open. The delay was, in part, due to internal and external politics that ownership had to weigh. More than one person who spoke to PhillyVoice on the condition of anonymity suggested Jerry Colangelo tried to intervene on Bryan’s behalf, threatening to interfere with club relationships around the league.
Storyline: Sixer Burner Accounts
Expect candidates like former Cavs GM David Griffin — with tight connections to upcoming free agent LeBron James — and Celtics assistant GM Mike Zarren to get serious consideration for the position, among other qualified candidates. The Sixers will also look at internal candidates, such as Marc Eversley and Ned Cohen, with the short window between the draft and free agency complicating a potential job search.
One of the five Twitter accounts allegedly linked to Bryan Colangelo “liked” public tweets by other users suggesting certain draft prospects would be good fits for the Philadelphia 76ers, according to multiple sources who independently shared evidence of the Twitter activity with The Athletic. Activity logs show “Still Balling” (@s_bonhams), one of the anonymous Twitter accounts named in the bombshell report from The Ringer last week that triggered an internal investigation of Colangelo by the team, liked multiple tweets and articles suggesting two prospects in the 2018 draft, Mikal Bridges and Miles Bridges, could make sense for the Sixers.
Storyline: Sixer Burner Accounts
The account also liked numerous other tweets praising Mikal and Miles Bridges, although those additional tweets did not specifically relate to how well the prospects would fit with the Sixers. The “Still Balling” account also liked tweets joking about LiAngelo Ball’s status as a draft prospect and how little pressure Trae Young would face if drafted by a Knicks team that isn’t expected to be competitive. Young is expected to be selected before the Sixers pick at 10 and Ball is unlikely to be drafted. The account had no other documented Twitter activity related to prospects likely to be selected by the Sixers with the 10th-overall pick.