Buck Williams Rumors

Though Grant’s career statistics are not special, he did average barely below a double/double in a nine-year stretch. When measured against Hall of Fame players who are winners, Grant fares well. In NBA history, 37 players have won four championships or more and 25 of 37 of those players (68 percent) are in the HOF or are soon to be in the HOF. Out of the 12 players who have four championships and are not in the Hall of Fame, Grant is the only one who has been an All-Star. That would be assuming Tony Parker and Manu Ginobli make the Hall of Fame. Grant, according to the advanced statistical research, is 47th all-time in NBA win shares. Only three players ahead of him on that list (Chauncey Billups, Shawn Marion and Buck Williams) are not in the Hall of Fame already or not first ballot type players once they become eligible. It doesn’t suggest Grant should be in the Basketball Hall of Fame, or that he will be. But perhaps the largest gap in acknowledging success.
Sam Smith: Jordan, now heading toward a seventh year without a title, is really pushing his teammates. He actually wanted different teammates; he wanted more veterans. He would have been fine with [Scottie] Pippen and [Horace] Grant getting traded for Buck Williams and Walter Davis – two ACC guys he liked since they were veterans who were more accomplished. That’s who we wanted to play with. He wanted guys to match [James] Worthy and Kareem [Abdul-Jabbar] with the Lakers and [Robert] Parish and [Kevin] McHale with the Celtics. He didn’t want to play with babies and so that was a source of frustration. As we’ve seen witnessed in this documentary and which we knew, he has this incredible manic competitiveness to the level that he wants to embarrass his opponent.
Storyline: Michael Jordan Documentary
He was also traded soon after to the Sacramento Kings, and by 1998, at 29, he was out of the league. He became, in essence, a cautionary tale as Colin Kaepernick pursues a case against the N.F.L. accusing it of colluding to deny him a job over his kneeling for the anthem last season. Abdul-Rauf did not get much support from his peers. “If you ask most players from that era, they’d say they regretted not supporting him more than they did,” Buck Williams, who in 1996 was president of the National Basketball Players Association, said in a recent telephone interview. “He was kind of left out on an island.”