Business Rumors

This is the square footage, among the disconnected and the disenfranchised and those being odd for effect mixed with those who are effectually odd, this is where Supreme Bey chooses to meet. “I love it here because everyone is so f—— weird,’’ says the man more commonly known as Chris Douglas-Roberts. “It’s the only place that no one stares at me.’’ As he sits down on a white sectional inside the relatively simplistic Cadillac Hotel, he is 11 years and a lifetime of self-discovery removed from the player who helped Memphis reach the Final Four in 2008. Now 32, he has bobbed-length dreads with gold tips and a full-mouthed diamond grill, and he wears both a black warmup jacket and black loafers with his DCTG (Don’t Cheat The Grind). A pair of bright socks peek out of his pants, Michael Jackson-Billie Jean video style, and black sunglasses shade his eyes, even as nightfall sets in.
Now here are the particulars. DCTG Sportswear is a trademarked brand, and you can buy the clothes online. Supreme says he has factories in Pakistan and China to mass-produce the apparel. He likes to keep supply low in order to ratchet up demand, but he also is the first to say that this is mostly a hobby. Raven, who played at Memphis, sketches her designs but is also just getting her line off the ground. The model, Mason, did sign a deal with APM, a boutique agency in New York, and Supreme did negotiate the contract. But Mason is not, technically, a supermodel. His foundation will focus on families in need in Memphis, but he’s only just returned there to get that started. As for the sports agency, he has eyes on a few players he’d love to represent. They just don’t know it yet.
Dolan and his business partner/friend/muse, Eagles manager Irving Azoff, are building and renovating entertainment venues around the world. That’s Dolan’s true love. Sports are a hobby, one that he’s hasn’t mastered. “I don’t see him selling because it keeps him relevant,” said a person close to Dolan. “It makes him matter. Maybe at some point, but not now.”
Storyline: James Dolan Selling Knicks?
Heritage estimates the shoe will be worth $20,000 at auction. The bidding starts at a quarter of the estimate ($5,000), and Nerat feels the shoe will sell for “multiples of our estimate.” “Larry’s had it in his basement for 17 years and it happens to be what I consider and what Heritage considers the most significant Air Jordan shoe in existence, and I don’t think we’re overexaggerating,” Nerat said.