Cedric Maxwell Rumors

After spending eight years in that role, he recently said he believes the team could benefit from someone with fresh perspectives. “I don’t think anything was missing with Brad,” Maxwell said. “I just think now everybody thinks it’s time for another voice. A voice gets tired after a while, so a new direction, a new following. And I happen to like the fact that Brad is being the head of basketball operations because who would know better about the weaknesses and the strengths of this team than the guy who’s seen this team almost every day. So he knows better than anybody what this team needs.”
Storyline: Celtics Coaching Search
Maxwell believes the most important job for the next coach will be connecting with the Celtics’ younger players. He thinks the team would benefit from hiring a person of color with NBA playing experience to coach. “I think it’s important because if you look at the Celtics front office, if you look at most of those people who are there, who have been in the front office, ownership, everything else, those people aren’t of color,” said Maxwell, now a Celtics radio analyst. “So I think it would help the players if they found somebody who they could relate to maybe a little bit more. So that’s why I think it’s very important.”
As a proud Black and LGBTQ woman, Violet Palmer especially was a barrier-breaker in more ways than one. And not everyone was comfortable. Those whispers Holtkamp-Sterling would hear as she entered the league years later? They were audible conversations for Palmer and Kantner, and sometimes more. Most notably, then-Celtics broadcaster Cedric Maxwell used a stunningly offensive “get back in the kitchen” line for a game Palmer was officiating in 2007 (Maxwell would later apologize). “Did I hear it? Of course,” Palmer, who retired from the NBA in 2016, said. “But did it bother me? No. None of it bothered me. They’re just talking about something they’re uncomfortable with.”

Cedric Maxwell on Luka Doncic: 'This is Larry Bird reincarnated'

Cedric Maxwell played for six seasons and won two championships alongside Larry Bird in Boston. He was named the most valuable player of the N.B.A. finals in 1981. So you listen intently when someone like Maxwell refers to Bird in assessing the Dallas Mavericks’ Luka Doncic. “You can quote me: This is Larry Bird reincarnated,” Maxwell said.
“Luka is better than Larry was at that age,” Maxwell said of Doncic, who turns 22 on Sunday. “The biggest thing is that there’s an arrogance, a cockiness, that Luka has that is directly out of the bloodstream of Larry Bird.” Doncic turned pro at 16 with the Spanish power Real Madrid, where he developed that maturity beyond his years. Bird was 22 when he scored 14 points in his N.B.A. debut. Another key contrast: Doncic didn’t land with a franchise as close to title contention as Bird and, in Year 3, finds himself in his most challenging stretch since he reached the N.B.A.

Cedric Maxwell: Luka Doncic is better than Larry Bird was at that age

Cedric Maxwell played for six seasons and won two N.B.A. championships alongside Larry Bird in Boston. He was named the most valuable player of the finals in 1981. So you listen intently when someone like Maxwell refers to Bird in assessing the Dallas Mavericks’ Luka Doncic. “You can quote me: This is Larry Bird reincarnated,” Maxwell said.