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David Levy Rumors

James Dolan couldn’t take the joke and his anger went all the way to the top. The Knicks owner complained to NBA commissioner Adam Silver about a 2018 episode of “Game of Zones,” an animated web series that poked fun of various NBA teams and characters, according to the show’s co-creator, Adam Malamut. Dolan’s complaints also reached David Levy, the former president of Turner, but were brushed aside, according to Malamut, who implied that Dolan’s hothead reputation made him easy to ignore.
“The league is cool with (Game of Zones). But technically they work for the owners and technically they had to let us know Dolan wasn’t cool with it,” Malamut said on the podcast ‘Rejecting the Screen’ with hosts Adam Stanco and Noah Coslov. “But everyone else was like, ‘That’s just this particular guy (Dolan), he’s a little fussy.’”
Storyline: Game of Zones
David Levy, the longtime television executive, was rolled out by the Nets as an important addition to their revamped organization in September. But by November, the team announced a “mutual parting of ways.” So what happened? According to multiple sources, Levy had written into his contract that he’d have influence over basketball operations. But that didn’t sit well with members of the Nets’ staff, and the pushback meant Levy was essentially bought out.
Storyline: Nets Front Office
Nets owner Joe Tsai spoke with Bloomberg Businessweek, and essentially said that he and Levy, the former president of Turner Broadcasting, had different expectations for the job. Tsai, who closed his record purchase of the Nets in September, also made Levy the president of J Tsai Sports. Through the holding company for his sports portfolio, Tsai owns not only the Nets, but the WNBA’s New York Liberty, a lacrosse team in San Diego, and stakes in MLS side LAFC and in the Premier Lacrosse League. “He was already looking ahead at how to grow the J Tsai sports portfolio, but we also needed someone to do the nuts and bolts,” Tsai told Bloomberg Businessweek. “Maybe he thought that he wanted to do something that’s bigger and he could just bring in other people to do it, and I’m of a view that before you outsource something you should do it yourself.”
Tsai wooed Levy, a 33-year veteran of Turner Sports, with a heavy portfolio. He was named CEO of the Nets, Barclays and J Tsai Sports, Tsai’s holding company that also controls the New York Liberty and his other sports investments in lacrosse, soccer and esports. Levy was also named an “alternate governor” of the Nets and a “venture partner” in Tsai’s family investment vehicle. Still, one team insider told NetsDaily that Levy was surprised to be managing something as small as the Nets after running Turner Media. And in fact, Levy told Bloomberg last month, “It wasn’t the job I signed up for and we agreed to part ways.” Both Tsai and Levy told Boudway they remain friends.